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March 6, 2015


 


For the latest forestry news, see the "Forestry News" section of the SAF homepage.

In This Issue ...

I. Featured News

1. Michigan: Alternative Energy from Wood Biomass
2. Hawaii: Kokee Logging Underway, Biomass Plant Ready and Waiting
3. Washington: State Not Interested in Letting Navy Use Land for Exercises
4. Idaho: Clearwater Collaborative Says Working Together Works
5. Oregon: Will Low Snowpack Affect the State's Fire Insurance?

II. Federal Lands Management

1. Forest Service Chief Lays Out Strategy, Agency Priorities in Testimony
2. GOP Investigates Possible Federal Protections for Bat Species
3. Rebuilding after Wildland Fire: New Developments Outpace Rebuilding in Burned Areas
4. Appeals Court in Oregon Upholds Protection for Threatened Seabird
5. Tester Lawsuit Gaffe Reveals Real Frustration with Logging Litigation

III. International Forestry News

1. Forest Management Still a Problem for Malaysia
2. Pakistan Plans Special Force to Protect Forests from Timber Mafia
3. Tropical Forests May Be Vanishing Even Faster than Previously Thought

IV. Forest Products Industry

1. Interfor Completes Acquisition of Simpson Sawmills
2. How an Oregon Forest Is Helping Chevy Meet Its Carbon Goals
3. Missouri Logging Company's Philosophy Outside the Norm
4. Manufacturers Make the Most of Veneers
5. How Ikea Is Managing Its Natural Wood Push

V. Biomass

1. Novel Pretreatment Could Cut Biofuel Costs by 30 Percent or More
2. USDA Publishes Final BCAP Rule
3. Getting Woodstoves from Here to There—in Utah and US
4. Procter & Gamble Fires Up Massive Biomass Investment
5. GAIN Report Highlights Status of UK Pellet Demand

VI. Wood Construction and Urban Forestry

1. Wood Construction: Minneapolis Office Building Made of Wood Would Be a US First
2. Urban Forestry: Hundreds of Trees along Ann Arbor Streets To Be Pruned under $91K Contract
3. Urban Forestry: Protection Zones Help Preserve Canopy Road Trees

VII. Plants and Pests

1. Fungus Could Halt Bark Beetle Munching
2. Hemlock Pest Found in Ohio
3. Eagan, Minnesota Joins the Emerald Ash Borer War

VIII. Science and Research

1. Satellites Give Unprecedented Views of Insect Outbreaks in Forests
2. Munching Bugs Thwart Eager Trees, Reducing the Carbon Sink
3. UBC Scientists Uncover Cause of Tree-Killing Fungus

IX. Items of Interest

1. Four Corners Logging, Regrowth Offer "Instant Curriculum"
2. Low-Impact Forestry for Veterans Certificate
3. New State Forest Named after Sen. Jim Jeffords To Be Created

X. SAF News

1. SAF Members in the News
2. Forest Policy News
3. SAF Journals: Research You Might Have Missed
4. Meetings: SAF State Societies and 2015 National Convention
5. Job Opportunities from the SAF Career Center


I. Featured News

1. Michigan: Alternative Energy from Wood Biomass

UpperMichiganSource.com (March 4) - The future of energy in Michigan's Upper Peninsula (UP) seems secure for the moment with a resolution for the Presque Isle Power Plant.

The L'Anse Warden Electric Company Plant went from burning coal to wood biomass in 2008, after the State of Michigan started requiring utilities to take in at least 10 percent of their energy from renewables. The only major biomass burning plant in the UP, it employs a total of 65 people and burns a combination of railroad ties, tire components, and wood chips.

The plant burns 300 to 400 tons of wood chips per day. That's at least 110,000 tons per year. Moreover, plant personnel say the UP has more than enough timber to go around, with acreage in the millions.

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2. Hawaii: Kokee Logging Underway, Biomass Plant Ready and Waiting

TheGardenIsland.com (March 5) - Now well underway, the Kokee Forest Restoration and Replanting Project calls for the removal of an estimated 15,000 tons of eucalyptus and pine trees from about 300 acres of forest reserve land scorched during fires in the summer of 2012, followed by the replanting of native and non-invasive species.

In January 2013, former Gov. Neil Abercrombie green-lighted the project via an emergency proclamation. Its purposes include "mitigating the postfire damage" from the three blazes that burned about 4,000 acres in the Kokee area and eliminating the threat to public health and safety from potentially devastating post-fire effects, including flash flooding and erosion.

The blackened wood from Kokee will soon meet the flame once again—this time as fuel for powering the island.

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3. Washington: State Not Interested in Letting Navy Use Land for Exercises

KitsapSun.com (March 2) - Washington State has told the US Navy that it's not interested in allowing state land on Olympic Peninsula to be used for electronic warfare exercises.

The Navy has proposed using mobile electronic emitters on three sites owned by the Department of Natural Resources so jet pilots could practice detecting the signals. The Navy had not yet applied for a lease or land-use permit.

People say they're worried about noise, public safety, and other potential impacts, and hundreds have opposed the proposal.

More:

Washington State Not Interested in Letting Navy Use Land for Exercises
NavyTimes.com (March 2)

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4. Idaho: Clearwater Collaborative Says Working Together Works

Spokesman.com (February 26) - The Clearwater Basin Collaborative, a working group of various interests, from recreation and conservation to forest products has issued a report listing its accomplishments in working out management issues for the Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forests.

The Clearwater Basin Collaborative, formally convened by Idaho Senator Mike Crapo in 2008, works primarily with the Forest Service to develop solutions to complex natural resource issues in north-central Idaho.

The Nez Perce and Clearwater Forests recognized the opportunity for a new approach to land management. Partnerships were formed to pen a proposal to restore conditions within the 1.4-million-acre Selway-Middle Fork ecosystem.

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5. Oregon: Will Low Snowpack Affect the State's Fire Insurance?

KOIN.com (February 26) - Oregon has faced bad fire seasons for the last two years, and now Oregon's Department of Forestry could lose insurance coverage as the state deals with low snowpack for this time of year.

Due to the catastrophic fire seasons Oregon has faced, Lloyd's of London has lost more money than it has made from its policy with the state. Now, with low snowpack in play, state officials and lawmakers are concerned that Lloyd's may not renew.

Note: SAF member Doug Decker is quoted in the article.

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II. Federal Lands Management

1. Forest Service Chief Lays Out Strategy, Agency Priorities in Testimony

Goldrushcam.com (February 26) - In testimony before the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, US Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell cited five focus areas for the President's proposed $4.9 billion Fiscal Year 2016 budget for the agency: restoring resilient landscapes, building thriving communities, managing wildland fires, promoting safety, and building diversity and inclusiveness.

More:

Administration Officials Support Changing Wildfire Funding

BendBulletin.com (February 27) - Administration officials gave full-throated support for treating the largest wildfires as natural disasters as they defended the White House's budget on Capitol Hill this week.

In separate appearances before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, US Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell and Interior Secretary Sally Jewell said the administration would like to revise the framework the federal government uses to pay for fighting wildfires.

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2. GOP Investigates Possible Federal Protections for Bat Species

The Hill.com (March 5) - The House Natural Resources Committee wants more information from the federal government before it decides whether to designate the northern long-eared bat as an endangered species.

The panel's Republicans, led by Chairman Rob Bishop (R-Utah), wrote in a letter to the US Fish and Wildlife Service that they are worried that an endangered listing or even a lesser "threatened" designation, could "impose unnecessary regulatory burdens on economic development, forestry, wind power generation, energy development, agriculture, and conservation projects."

Note: SAF policy team continues to be engaged in the issues surrounding the potential listing of the bat. To read more about SAF's activities, see the February and March issues of The Forestry Source.

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3. Rebuilding after Wildland Fire: New Developments Outpace Rebuilding in Burned Areas

US Forest Service (March 4) - When wildland fires destroy buildings, do people rebuild? Using aerial and satellite imagery, researchers have been tracking construction in areas burned by wildland fires and the findings reveal that new development outpaces reconstruction of burned buildings.

Related:

Study Reveals 900,000 Homes At Risk from Wildfires

Insurancenewsnet.com (February 26) - According to new data released by CoreLogic, nearly 900,000 single-family homes across 13 states in the western US are currently designated at "High" or "Very High" risk for wildfire damage, representing a combined total reconstruction value estimated at more than $237 billion. Of the total homes identified, more than 192,000 fall into the "Very High Risk" category alone, with total reconstruction cost valued at more than $49.6 billion.

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4. Appeals Court in Oregon Upholds Protection for Threatened Seabird

News-record.com (March 3) - A federal appeals court has rejected a lawsuit by the members of the forest products industry seeking to strip Endangered Species Act protection from a threatened seabird that nests in old-growth forests.

Environmentalists say the ruling by the US Court of Appeals in Washington, DC, should mark the end of a 15-year legal battle over logging trees used by marbled murrelets along the coasts of Oregon, Washington, and northern California.

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5. Tester Lawsuit Gaffe Reveals Real Frustration with Logging Litigation

Ravallirepublic.com (March 2) - Sen. Jon Tester recently got called out by the Washington Post "Fact Checker," Glenn Kessler, for claiming, "every logging sale in Montana is under litigation" and then for revising the statement to "nearly half the awarded timber volume in fiscal 2014 is currently under litigation."

Tester's misstatements about problems with national forest management may reveal a hotter issue: Congress' fixation on changing the way people can challenge the agency in court.

More:

Montana Senator Twice Gets His Facts Wrong on Timber Sales and Litigation
Washington Post.com (February 25)

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III. International Forestry News

1. Forest Management Still a Problem for Malaysia

The Epochtimes.com (March 3) - Two international nongovernmental organizations have called out Malaysia in recent months over the country's widespread illegal logging. Malaysia has been accused of not doing enough to protect its diminishing forests and thwart the illicit timber trade, particularly in Sarawak, the site of the country's worst deforestation. In reports issued recently, the organizations claim lack of governmental oversight, endemic corruption, and limited transparency have allowed Malaysia's forests to be plundered by the private sector.

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2. Pakistan Plans Special Force to Protect Forests from Timber Mafia

Rtcc.org (March 3) - Pakistan's northwest Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province plans to raise a special force to protect forests from a powerful timber mafia, generate jobs for youth, and protect the rights of forest communities.

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3. Tropical Forests May Be Vanishing Even Faster than Previously Thought

Washingtonpost.com (February 26) - According to the United Nations' Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, recent years have seen "decreasing deforestation rates and increased afforestation"—and thus, less carbon dioxide pouring into to the atmosphere from this source.

But according to a new study in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, the United Nations has it wrong. The study, by the University of Maryland, College Park, geographer Do-Hyung Kim and two colleagues, uses satellite imagery to examine how tropical forests in particular are faring-and their answer is far from heartening.

More:

Deforestation in Brazil Is Rising Again—after Years of Decline
Vox.com (March 2)

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IV. Forest Products Industry

1. Interfor Completes Acquisition of Simpson Sawmills

Marketwatch.com (March 2) - Interfor announced it has completed the acquisition of four sawmills from Simpson Lumber Company, LLC, increasing its annual lumber production capacity by 30 percent to 3.1 billion board feet and reinforcing its position as the fastest growing lumber company in the world.

The purchase of the sawmills in Tacoma, Washington; Longview, Washington; Meldrim, Georgia; and Georgetown, South Carolina, are key to Interfor's growth strategy and firmly establishes its presence in the United States. Two-thirds of Interfor's total annual capacity is now in the US: 900 million board feet in the Northwest and 1.2 billion board feet in the Southeast.

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2. How an Oregon Forest Is Helping Chevy Meet Its Carbon Goals

Bizjournals.com (March 2) - Ecotrust Forest Management Inc. has closed on an agreement to sell the carbon credits for a 980-acre forest it manages on the Oregon Coast to General Motors' Chevrolet brand.

The project will generate 150,000 tons of carbon credits over its lifetime. General Motors purchased the output for the first five years.

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3. Missouri Logging Company's Philosophy Outside the Norm

KBIA.org (March 3) - Pioneer Forest, located deep in the heart of the Missouri Ozarks, is the largest private landowner in the state with 143,000 acres spread out over six counties. For about 60 years Pioneer has cut down trees on its land and sold them. But its founder, Leo Drey, had something else in mind for the land management company besides making money. And his philosophy is still in place at Pioneer all these years later.

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4. Manufacturers Make the Most of Veneers

Furnituretoday.com (March 3) - In furniture, veneer-very thinly sliced wood-ranges from 1/42-inch to 1/28-inch thick. This material is typically glued onto medium-density fiberboard or particleboard on tabletops, headboards and footboards, drawer fronts, and side panels.

Much of this material was once processed in the United States and some still is. However, as the case goods industry migrated to Asia so did the veneer industry.

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5. How Ikea Is Managing Its Natural Wood Push

Core77.com (March 4) - Ikea recently launched their NORNÄS line, "a modern collection in raw, untreated, high-quality pine from slow-growing forests in Northern Sweden." When they announced it earlier this year it was a bit of a surprise for two reasons: One, the company is known for using particle board more than natural wood and, two, wouldn't a company doing Ikea levels of volume—the kickoff shipment alone was 200,000 pieces—quickly deforest all of Scandinavia?

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V. Biomass

1. Novel Pretreatment Could Cut Biofuel Costs by 30 Percent or More

Ethanolproducer.com (February 26) - Researchers at the University of California-Riverside have invented a novel pretreatment technology that could cut the cost of biofuels production by about 30 percent or more by dramatically reducing the amount of enzymes needed to breakdown the raw materials that form biofuels.

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2. USDA Publishes Final BCAP Rule

Ethanolproducer.com (March 2) - The USDA has released the final rule for the Biomass Crop Assistance Program, and though the general scope of BCAP is not changing with its recently published final rule, there are some key changes being made to the program, including matching payment and funding amounts, material eligibility, and project areas.

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3. Getting Woodstoves from Here to There—in Utah and US

Biomass Magazine.com (March 3) - This February, the wood heating community experienced two major upheavals, one in a state where the governor proposed banning wintertime stove use and the other being the release of new national stove regulations for the first time since 1988. In both cases, industry agreed with the goals, but opposed the way government is getting there.

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4. Procter & Gamble Fires Up Massive Biomass Investment

Forbes.com (March 3) - For consumer products giant Procter & Gamble biomass continues to be highly strategic. Indeed, it's working on one of the biggest corporate biomass plants in the United States, a 50-megawatt installation at its Bounty and Charmin manufacturing plant in Albany, Georgia.

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5. GAIN Report Highlights Status of UK Pellet Demand

Biomass Magazine.com (March 3) - A report recently filed with the USDA Foreign Agricultural Service Global Agricultural Information Network focuses on the UK wood pellet market.

The report estimates the United Kingdom imported 4.6 million metric oven dried tons of wood pellets last year, making the country the largest importer of wood pellets in the world. The United States was the largest exporter of pellets last year, with an estimated 3.6 million metric tons sold overseas, 75 percent of which was destined for the United Kingdom.

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VI. Wood Construction and Urban Forestry

1. Wood Construction: Minneapolis Office Building Made of Wood Would Be a US First

Next City.org (February 27) - Last November, the Hines development company unveiled plans for a new office building in the North Loop section of Minneapolis. Although this may seem like ordinary news, the building would be the first of its kind in the United States to be made primarily of wood. The builders refer to the project as "T3" for "Timber, Technology, and Transit."

More:

World's Tallest Wooden Skyscraper Planned for Vienna
City Metric.com (March 2)

Why Doesn't the World Have More Wooden Skyscrapers?
Curbed.com (March 3)

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2. Urban Forestry: Hundreds of Trees along Ann Arbor Streets To Be Pruned under $91K Contract

Mlive.com (March 5) - The Ann Arbor City Council has voted unanimously to approve a $91,210 contract with PROCARE Tree Service LLC, doing business as CHOP.

The work to be completed through the contract continues a multi-phased approach to address a backlog of tree maintenance in Ann Arbor, said Kerry Gray, the city's urban forest and natural resource planner.

CHOP will be tasked with removing large limbs that are dead, broken, hanging, or diseased on trees listed as "Priority 1" for pruning in the city's tree inventory.

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3. Urban Forestry: Protection Zones Help Preserve Canopy Road Trees

Tallahassee.com (February 27) - Within the City of Tallahassee and Leon County, nine roadways, totaling 78 miles, have been officially designated as Canopy Roads. Trees within 100 feet from the centerline of these roads are afforded special protection by city and county ordinances and regulations.

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VII. Plants and Pests

1. Fungus Could Halt Bark Beetle Munching

AZ Daily Sun.com (March 1) - Bark beetles were flitting around Rich Hofstetter's lab at Northern Arizona University earlier this week—escapees from one of several ponderosa pine logs sitting in plastic tubs stacked in the corner.

Though harmless inside the lab's walls, the species, Ips lecontei, has a deadly history—it was the biggest killer of ponderosa pine trees during the state's 2002 drought.

The tiny bugs are test subjects in Hofstetter's most recent project: a quest to find a fungus strain that will kill the beetles that have wreaked havoc on trees throughout the West.

Note: Hofstetter is a member of SAF.

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2. Hemlock Pest Found in Ohio

Sent-trib.com (February 24) - The Ohio Department of Agriculture and the Ohio Department of Natural Resources have announced the discovery of a hemlock-killing pest in Jackson County in southern Ohio. The hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA) is a small, aphid-like insect native to Asia that threatens the health and sustainability of eastern hemlock and Carolina hemlock in the eastern United States.

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3. Eagan, Minnesota Joins the Emerald Ash Borer War

Twincities.com (February 27) - That the emerald ash borer has made its way to Eagan, Minnesota, is no surprise to a state official tasked with controlling the insect's devastating reach.

More:

Insecticide Can't Save Park Trees from Deadly Beetle

Hamilton Spectator.com (March 3) - Century-old ash trees are falling in Victoria Park despite being inoculated against the emerald ash borer-an ominous sign for a city effort to salvage a remnant of the threatened tree species.

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VIII. Science and Research

1. Satellites Give Unprecedented Views of Insect Outbreaks in Forests

OregonState.edu (March 1) - Scientists for the first time have simultaneously compared widespread impacts from two of the most common forest insects in the West—the mountain pine beetle and the western spruce budworm—an advance that could lead to more effective management policies.

By combining data from satellites, airplanes, and ground-based crews, the researchers have shown in unprecedented detail how insects affect Western forests over decades.

More:

This Data Project Could Help Save Forests Being Destroyed by Insects
Gigaom.com (March 2)

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2. Munching Bugs Thwart Eager Trees, Reducing the Carbon Sink

ESciencenews.com (March 2) - In a high carbon dioxide world, the trees would come out ahead. Except for the munching bugs. A new study published in Nature Plants shows that hungry, plant-eating insects may limit the ability of forests to take up elevated levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, reducing their capacity to slow human-driven climate change.

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3. UBC Scientists Uncover Cause of Tree-Killing Fungus

News.ubc.ca (March 4) - Forest scientists at the University of British Columbia believe they've discovered the root cause of a deadly tree fungus: extra genes.

The fungus, Mycosphaerella populorum, uses extra genes to produce a toxin that can cause fatal lesions on the leaves, stems, and branches of poplar trees. The extra genes were found through genome sequencing, the mapping of an organism's DNA.

The discovery of their existence, outlined this week in a study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, brings researchers one-step closer to fully understanding how the fungus attacks and kills trees.

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IX. Items of Interest

1. Four Corners Logging, Regrowth Offer "Instant Curriculum"

Superior Telegram.com (February 27) - Wrapped in layers of warm clothing, Four Corners Elementary School students recently made the trek along the school's Burstrom Trail to see a changed landscape. About 19 acres of forestland around the school is being logged for aspen.

Active forest management on school land is not uncommon in the badger state. Similar logging operations have taken place in the Maple School District and in the Superior school forest.

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2. Low-Impact Forestry for Veterans Certificate

Sterling College.edu (undated) - Although unemployment numbers for veterans have been declining nationwide, they still face many challenges in returning to the civilian workforce, especially in natural resource based businesses. To help mitigate these challenges, Sterling College is now offering a low-impact forestry for veterans certificate.

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3. New State Forest Named after Sen. Jim Jeffords To Be Created

VTdigger.org (February 26) - The Trust for Public Land and the State of Vermont recently announced that a new 1,346-acre state forest will be created in former Sen. Jim Jeffords' hometown of Shrewsbury and will be named after the late senator.

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X. SAF News

1. SAF Members in the News

Remosoft founders Andrea Feunekes and Ugo Feunekes received an award and were inducted into the Forestry Hall of Fame for their "Contribution to the Global Forestry Sector." The Award given out by the Association of Registered Professional Foresters of New Brunswick (ARPFNB) and recognizes their contribution to the forest industry, government departments, and university forestry and environmental programs.

The Forest Products Society recognized SAF Member Dalia Abbas for her outstanding leadership as Regional Board Member during its recent international convention in Quebec, Canada. (Source: Tennessee State Univ. CAHNS Newsletter (Spring 2015)

The NYSAF has recognized state Department of Environmental Conservation employees and SAF members Tom Martin, CF; Sloane Crawford; and Fred Munk for their service to the profession.

SAF members David Dickens and Michael Kane recently received awards from the Southeastern SAF for their service to forestry education and research.

SAF member Dallin Brooks, administrative vice president of the council and executive director of the Western Wood Preservers Institute, was quoted in an article that appeared in US News.com about the use of wooden utility poles.

If you've had a media moment, or you know of another SAF member who's been in the news lately, please let us know.

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2. Forest Policy News

  • SAF Forest Policy Director John Barnwell and Chief Executive Officer Matt Menashes met with US Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell and Associate Chief Mary Wagner at the agency's headquarters to talk about the future of forestry and the forestry profession. The conversation touched on how SAF can work with the agency to meet the needs of agency staff.

  • SAF Assistant Director of Forest Policy Danielle Watson, Director of Member Services Corey Ruple, and Henry Clepper Forest Policy Intern Bridget Bodick recently attended the Sustainable Urban Forestry Coalition (SUFC) reception at the US Botanic Garden in Washington, DC. There they connected with a number of current and former SAF members who work in urban forestry and strategized with partners such as the Arbor Day Foundation about how to leverage resources and work together more often. The event also featured presentations by Representative David Joyce from Ohio and Steve Koehn the Director of Cooperative Forestry at the US Forest Service.

  • Danielle also participated in SUFC's annual meeting in Silver Spring, Maryland. The meeting hosted a record number of participants across a broad diversity of organizations, in addition to strong representation from various federal agencies. Danielle is exploring ways for SAF to get more involved in other SUFC activities such as research and youth engagement.

  • John Barnwell also had a meeting with Port of Port Angeles Director of Engineering, Chris Hartman. Hartman discussed the involvement of the Port in advocating for forest management, the far reach of forestry, and the many valuable partnerships that can be built when starting conversations about trees.

  • Finally, the SAF Policy Team is hosting the Forest Policy Committee at SAF's headquarters in Bethesda, Maryland, on March 5 and 6, in advance of the SAF Board of Directors meeting on March 7 and 8.

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3. SAF Journals: Research You Might Have Missed

Interested in what your colleagues have been reading? Below are the top most downloaded articles from each of SAF's scientific journal publications for the month of January.

Forest Site Classification for Cultural Plant Harvest by Tribal Weavers Can Inform Management (Journal of Forestry Vol. 113, No. 1)

Calculation of a Growth Dominance Statistic for Forest Stands (Forest Science Vol. 60, No. 6)

To see the complete top 10 most downloaded article lists, visit the publications page on the SAF website, click on the journal you wish to view, then click Most Downloaded Articles.

Your GOLD- or PLATINUM-level membership entitles you to free access to all journal content, but you need to register with IngentaConnect to get it. Questions? Contact Matthew Walls.

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4. Meetings: SAF and Otherwise

New England Society of American Foresters 95th Annual Winter Meeting: Changing Silviculture in a Changing World
March 25-27
Lake Morey Resort in Fairlee, VT
For more information, visit the NESAF website.

Alaska SAF Annual Meeting
March 25-27
PikeĀ¹s Waterfront Lodge, Fairbanks, AK
Contact: Jim Schwarber

Washington SAF — Washington Chapter of The Wildlife Society Joint Annual Meeting
April 15-17
Great Wolf Lodge, Grand Mound, WA
Contact: Peter Heide at (360) 791-8299

Oregon SAF — Oregon Chapter of The Wildlife Society Joint Annual Meeting
April 29-May 1
Eugene Hilton, Eugene, OR
Contact: Dale Claassen at (541) 954-6953, or Fran Cafferata Coe at (503) 680-7939

2015 SAF National Convention News

The 2015 SAF National Convention — Recreating Forestry — "The Confluence of Science, Society, and Technology" — will highlight a variety of contemporary forest resource management issues, including the trends, influences, and technologies that are facilitating the profession's progress toward the future.

The meeting will take place in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, where attendees will enjoy fabulous hospitality, the charm of Louisiana's capital city on the banks of the mighty Mississippi, and world-renowned cuisine alongside a scientific and technical program that provides an intrinsic opportunity for exploring the many links between the social, economic, and ecological considerations that form modern forest stewardship. Visit the SAF Convention website for full event details.

Abstract submission is now open for individual presentations and panels in the scientific and technical concurrent sessions or poster symposium. Submit Your Presentation or Poster.

New for 2015! The "Boots on the Ground" concurrent track is designed to present case studies and research that can help field foresters find solutions to management problems they face on a regular basis. Topics may include (but are not limited to):

  • Managing around oil and gas pipelines
  • The Clean Water Act
  • Tips for working more effectively with contractors and migrant workers
  • Wild pig management
  • How to work with local ordinances
  • Maintaining soil physical and chemical properties and organic matter
  • Procurement tips and tools
  • Logging and timber supply trends
  • New and emerging field technologies

New for 2015! The SAF Matters concurrent track is designed to provide a forum for members to discuss various issues, share best practices for State Society management, or learn about and promote ongoing and upcoming initiatives.

We encourage your submissions on these and other topics: Recreating Forestry through Science, Recreating Forestry through Society, Recreating Forestry through Technology, Recreating Forestry through Education and Outreach, Agroforestry, Consulting Forestry, Entomology & Pathology, Economics, Fire, Forest Ecology, Geospatial Technologies, History, International Forestry, Inventory & Biometrics, Policy, Recreation, Silviculture, Social Sciences, Soils & Hydrology, US Forest Service National Silviculture Workshop (NSW), Urban & Community Forestry, Utilization & Engineering, and Wildlife Management.

For more information on presenting see the SAF convention website. Click here to submit an abstract.

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5. Job Opportunities from the SAF Career Center

Below are some of the hundreds of exciting professional opportunities available on SAF Career Center.

Timberland Acquisition Forester
Forest Grove, OR
Stimson Lumber

Assistant Professor of Biometry and Quantitative Ecology
Raleigh, NC
North Carolina State University

Forest Watershed Management
Corvallis, OR
Oregon State University

Forest Engineer
Coos Bay, OR
Plum Creek

Assistant Professor in Forest Operations
Orono, ME
University of Maine

Timber Sales Forester
Tacoma, WA
Interfor Corporation

Forestry Field Programs Supervisor Outreach and Communications and Forestry Field Programs Supervisor Forest Products
Jefferson City, MO
Missouri Department of Conservation

Silviculture Manager
Charlotte, NC
Hancock Forest Management

Research Associate
Columbia, MO
University of Missouri

Forestry Properties Manager
Lincoln, NE
Nebraska Forest Service

To view all jobs, visit the Career Center on the SAF website.

Job seekers: Be sure to update your resume on SAF Career Center, so employers can contact you privately about job opportunities.

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