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October 31, 2014

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In This Issue ...

I. Featured News

1. New Jersey: Environmentalists, Lawmakers Split on Open Space Funding Referendum
2. Consultants: Timberland a Good Investment for Idaho's Endowment, but Not Idaho Commercial Real Estate
3. Alabama: Forestry Commission Unveils Website That Can Determine Wildfire Risk
4. Washington: Mudslide Lawsuit Blames Governments, Timber Company
5. Montana/Washington: TNC to Acquire 165,000 Acres of Plum Creek Forestland
6. California: Wildfire Case Ignites Legal Debate about Federal Misconduct
7. Utah: Under Secretary Bonnie Tells World Congress of Scientists Their Work Will Light the Way to Better Forest Management

II. Federal Lands Management

1. Report: Second-Growth Logging Can Start Now
2. Salvage Logging Begins after Oregon Wildfire
3. Lawmakers Tour Deschutes Forest Health Projects
4. Management, Communication at Heart of Forestry Summit
5. Monitoring and Oversight a Common Theme in FWPP Public Comments

III. International Forestry News

1. Expert: Forestry Still Missing the Picture on Women and Social Sciences
2. Indonesian Forests to Benefit from PEFC Certification
3. Student Joins International Prescribed Burn Training

IV. Forest Products Industry

1. SmartLam Outgrowing Its Columbia Falls Site
2. Commercial Market for Western Juniper Studied
3. US Timberland, Unusually, Outperforms Farmland
4. Tour Highlights the Importance of Timber Industry in Northwest Montana
5. Weyerhaeuser CEO Doyle R. Simons Says Housing Stats on Path Out of the Woods
6. ACLT: Some Loggers, Truckers Halt Delivery to Boise

V. Biomass

1. Herty Announces Consortium for Advanced Wood-to-Energy Solutions
2. Biomass Plant Wins Forestry Sourcing Certification
3. Environmental Group Criticizes Penns Valley Biomass Burner
4. Bioenergy Push Spurs Two New Wood Pellet Plants in Arkansas

VI. Wildfire

1. Wildfire Risk to Stay High into December
2. Fires and Floods: North Cascades Federal Lands Prepare for Climate Change
3. House Democrats Again Seek Vote on Wildfire Bill

VII. Forest Pests

1. Long Island Confronts Destructive Southern Pine Beetles
2. Chicago Tree Trimming Backlog Is Two Years
3. Emerald Ash Borer Detected in Monmouth, Kirkwood

VIII. Water Resources

1. Arizona: Agreement Protects Forests near San Pedro River
2. Legislation in Works for Oregon Herbicide Spraying
3. Mature Forests Store Nitrogen in Soil: May Help Protect Waterways from Excess Nitrogen from Industry

IX. Science and Research

1. Dreaming of Giants: The Future of American Chestnut Restoration
2. Variation in Antibiotic Bacteria in Tropical Forest Soils May Play a Role in Diversity
3. Study: Climate Change Will Make Wildfires Worse for Arizona, Nation

X. Items of Interest

1. Forests a Fascination Since High School for Legislative Affairs Specialist
2. UGA's Warnell School Honors Distinguished Alumni
3. Ohio DNR Recognizes Outstanding Foresters
4. Retiring Ranger Wonders Who Will Keep the "Wild" in Wilderness

XI. SAF News

1. 2014 SAF Elections Ballot
2. Be Sure You Receive Your 2014 Election Ballot
3. SAF Launches New Membership Portal
4. Renew Your SAF Membership for 2015
5. Research You May Be Missing


I. Featured News

1. Environmentalists, New Jersey Lawmakers Split on Open Space Funding Referendum

NJ.com (October 30) - When voters go to the polls in New Jersey next Tuesday, they'll be asked whether they support a constitutional amendment dedicating a portion of the state's corporate business tax to create a steady stream of funding to preserve open space.

Last August, the state's Democratic-controlled state legislature passed a bill proposing the funding stream as a way to avoid the state's traditional way of paying for open space preservation: borrowing money.

A spokesperson for the state Department of Environmental Protection, said the proposed constitutional amendment "would seriously undermine existing DEP programs that protect the environment," such as hazardous site remediation programs, water monitoring, and state parks.

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2. Consultants: Timberland a Good Investment for Idaho's Endowment, but Not Idaho Commercial Real Estate

Spokesman.com (October 28) - Idaho's state Land Board heard an extensive report from a consulting firm on the allocation and governance of the state endowment's assets, whose earnings largely benefit public schools. Among the findings: Timberland is an excellent investment for Idaho's endowment, and balances the volatility of the endowment's financial investments. But Idaho commercial real estate is not.

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3. Alabama Forestry Commission Unveils Website That Can Determine Wildfire Risk

Blog.Al.com (October 29) - Alabama Forestry Commission has unveiled a new website that will help homeowners and communities across the state determine wildfire risk, as well as take measures to minimize or mitigate potential wildfire hazards.

The Southern Wildfire Risk Assessment Portal, nicknamed "SouthWRAP," allows users in Alabama and 12 other southern states to identify wildfire threats based on landscape characteristics, historical fire occurrence, weather conditions, and terrain. It also routes users to resources that can help them implement wildfire prevention practices.

The website is available at www.southernwildfirerisk.com.

Related:

Museum Dedicated to Forestry and Agriculture to Open at the Fairgrounds
AL.com (October 24)

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4. Mudslide Lawsuit Blames Governments, Timber Company

Heraldnet.com (October 27) - A lawsuit filed last week alleges that officials working for Snohomish County, the state of Washington, and a Skagit County-based logging company failed to take steps that would have protected people from harm during the recent mudslides.

The suit contends the state was negligent for ignoring studies that raised questions about how logging may have affected the hill's stability. Timber harvests were approved on the hillside in 2004, 2009, and 2011.

The logging company- Grandy Lake Forest Associates-owned a portion of the land that was logged and built logging roads in the area, and the lawsuit claims the work was done in violation of state forest-practices rules.

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5. TNC to Acquire 165,000 Acres of Plum Creek Forestland in Montana, Washington

Plumcreek.com (October 27) - Plum Creek Timber Company, Inc. announced it has reached an agreement to sell approximately 165,000 acres of Montana and Washington forestland to The Nature Conservancy (TNC) for $134 million.

The agreement includes timberlands located at relatively high elevations with slower growing trees. Although less productive for timber operations, these lands are desired for forest conservation, recreation, public access, and ecological protection. They are among the most ecologically diverse and intact biological systems remaining in the United States, including lands in the lower Blackfoot Valley near Missoula, Montana, located in the Crown of the Continent, and also lands on both sides of Interstate 90 between Snoqualmie Pass and Ellensburg in Kittitas County, Washington, located in the Heart of the Cascades.

More:

The Nature Conservancy Announces Largest WA Land Acquisition in Its History: 48,000 Acres
Seattle Weekly.com (October 28)

Plum Creek to sell 117,000 acres at Placid Lake, Gold Creek to Nature Conservancy
Ravelli Republic.com (October 27)

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6. Wildfire Case Ignites Legal Debate about Federal Misconduct

UTSandiego.com (October 28) - A legal battle-filled with allegations of fraud, corruption, and official misconduct - is unfolding in a Northern California in a case involving state and federal efforts to secure a massive financial settlement from the state's largest land owner, Sierra Pacific Industries.

Authorities say a bulldozer from a subcontractor working for the Shasta County-based lumber company sparked the Moonlight Fire that burned 65,000 acres in northeast California in 2007. Sierra Pacific has long denied responsibility for it, but after a courtroom setback, the company agreed to a $55 million settlement and agreed to give the government 22,500 acres.

But earlier this month, the government's case continued to unravel. Sierra Pacific filed a 100-page motion with the US District Court accusing prosecutors of fraud and a cover-up-and asking it to vacate the massive settlement.

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7. Under Secretary Bonnie Tells World Congress of Scientists Their Work Will Light the Way to Better Forest Management

USDA.gov (October 29) - Confronting climate change will be substantially cheaper and easier if we conserve forests, and the key to that is expert knowledge and science, Under Secretary of Natural Resources and the Environment Robert Bonnie told thousands of attendees at the recent 24th World Congress of the International Union of Forest Research Organizations in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Bonnie served as the keynote speaker of the World Congress, the largest in the United States for foresters and scientists. Among attendees were 700 students and an additional 1,300 professional foresters, who joined them for the annual conventions of the Society of American Foresters and Canadian Institute of Forestry.

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II. Federal Lands Management

1. Report: Second-Growth Logging Can Start Now

KRBD.org (October 28) - Tongass National Forest officials want the timber industry to log and process fewer old trees. They're planning a 10- to-15-year transition to harvesting younger forests.

Two Oregon researchers, one an industry consultant and the other an environmental activist, say it can happen sooner. In this article, they talk about their plan-one of several under discussion.

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2. Salvage Logging Begins after Oregon Wildfire

WRAL.com (October 26) - Last week, a western Oregon field forester for the American Forest Resource Council, and a representative from Boise-Cascade toured a portion of the 17,000 acres blackened in Klamath County; roughly 5,000 of those acres are public land managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Before the Gulch Fire ignited on July 31, the land was covered with grassy flats, shrubs, oak woodland, pine, and other conifer. Now, timber managers are scouring the area to find out what's left and if it has any value.

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3. Lawmakers Tour Deschutes Forest Health Projects

KTVZ.com (October 22) - Wildfire season is officially over, but the focus for lawmakers is already on next season.

The legislators had a field trip October 22 to visit thinning and other projects on the Deschutes National Forest in Bend and Sisters areas.

Last year, the Oregon Legislature invested $2.88 million in measures to improve the health of Oregon's forests, which is an unprecedented move.

The funds are especially important, since much of the prevention funds are exhausted by the costs of firefighting.

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4. Management, Communication at Heart of Forestry Summit

Blue Mountain Eagle.com (October 28) - Approximately 175 people attended a panel discussion on forestry issues October 20, at the Blue Mountain Conference Center in La Grande, Oregon, hosted by new regional forester Jim Peña and Rep. Greg Walden (R-OR).

Residents of rural eastern Oregon want to see more done on federally managed forests to restore timber jobs, maintain public access, and protect communities from potentially destructive wildfires. They also want more direct engagement with the US Forest Service as the agency continues revising its 15-year Blue Mountains National Forests Land Management Plan.

Panelists included representatives from mining, recreation, agricultural and logging industries, as well as county officials. One by one, they expressed their concerns and vented frustrations over a perceived lack of active management on the Umatilla, Wallowa-Whitman, and Malheur National Forests.

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5. Monitoring and Oversight a Common Theme in FWPP Public Comments

KNAU.org (October 23) - The recent public comment period for the Flagstaff Watershed Protection Project yielded more than 500 issues for managers to consider. As Arizona Public Radio's Ryan Heinsius reports, many local residents voiced concerns about how the large-scale forest-thinning project will be monitored.

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III. Internatinal Forestry

1. Expert: Forestry Still Missing the Picture on Women and Social Sciences

CIFOR.org (October 29) - Rural women remain "somewhat invisible" to the forestry world, despite a growing understanding of their roles in forest environments, according to Carol Colfer, a senior associate with the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) who has been studying anthropology and forests for 20 years.

In a keynote speech at the recent IUFRO 2014 World Congress, Colfer laid out the challenges and opportunities for research to inform sustainable forest management by focusing on people, especially women.

Related:

New Guidebook Seeks to Boost Forest Clout for a Massive, Marginalized Group
CIFOR.org (October 28)

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2. Indonesian Forests to Benefit from PEFC Certification

Infolink.com (October 29) - The endorsement of the Indonesian Forest Certification Co-operation (IFCC) by the world's leading forest certification system, the Program for the Endorsement of Forest Certification (PEFC), is expected to benefit Indonesian forests, home to some of the most biologically diverse forests in the world.

PEFC International Secretary General Ben Gunneberg observed that the endorsement signifies a turning point for Indonesia, which has been battling high deforestation rates. He explains that forest certification represents an important mechanism to verify and promote sustainable forest management, thus safeguarding the environmental, social, and economic benefits provided by forests.

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3. Student Joins International Prescribed Burn Training

NMHU.edu (October 27) - Elyssa Durán of Highlands University was the only student and the youngest person to work the fire line when resource managers and firefighters from across the globe came to New Mexico for a prescribed-burn training.

Durán, 24, a natural resources management graduate student, spent two weeks in the Jemez Mountains in September as part of a Spanish language prescribed fire training exchange, or TREX. Trainees came from Mexico, Spain, Argentina, Costa Rica, Guatemala, and other countries.

The TREX international training is by invitation only. The Nature Conservancy, US Forest Service, and The Fire Learning Network sponsor the event.

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IV. Forest Products Industry

1. SmartLam Outgrowing Its Columbia Falls Site

Flathead Newsgroup.com (October 29) - SmartLam, the only manufacturer of cross-laminated timber products in the United States, is quickly outgrowing its current location in Columbia Falls and is looking for a new site for a much larger manufacturing plant.

The SmartLam plant in Columbia Falls, which currently employs about 35 workers, takes lower-grade dimensional lumber, finger-joints them into a better grade two-inch product, and then cross-laminates the two-inch products into large panels.

SmartLam is looking at constructing a new building ranging from 120,000 to 160,000 square feet to house the two manufacturing lines along with an architectural center that will enable the company to start producing custom-cut panels for commercial construction projects.

Related:

New Wood Construction Technology Gets Boost

EarthTechling.com (October 28) - At the Wood Solutions Fair, Oregon BEST announced a new round of commercialization funding that will team southern Oregon-based DR Johnson Lumber Co. with Oregon State University researchers to determine how a new engineered building material made from lumber might catapult Oregon wood products to the forefront of construction innovation and technology.

More:

How a Southern Oregon Lumber Mill Looks to Europe for a Better Way to Build
Bizjournals.com (October 28)

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2. Commercial Market for Western Juniper Studied

Capital Press.com (October 27) - Sustainable Northwest, a Portland nonprofit, will use a USDA Rural Development grant to expand markets for western juniper, which could help keep greater sage grouse off the endangered species list, aid eastern Oregon ranchers, and provide jobs.

The idea is to certify engineering design values for juniper, which is naturally rot-resistant and for now is largely limited to use as landscape timbers, sign posts, garden boxes, and the like.

Oregon State University and the West Coast Lumber Inspection Bureau will assess the design values over the coming year. A bigger market for lumber made from western juniper could have an echo effect in Eastern Oregon, where removing the tree is seen as a key factor in helping sage grouse recover.

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3. US Timberland, Unusually, Outperforms Farmland

Agrimoney.com (October 27) - Timberland has, for the first time in four years, proved a better investment than farmland, as the improved world economy drives demand for wood for both construction and energy.

US timberland returned 1.47 percent in the July-to-September quarter, the best performance for the period in seven years, according to the National Council of Real Estate Investment Fiduciaries.

It also, narrowly, outstripped the 1.45 percent returned by farmland-a rare occurrence.

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4. Tour Highlights the Importance of Timber Industry in Northwest Montana

KPAX.com (October 24) - Some of the leaders in northwest Montana's timber industry explored what the future of lumber production could look like and why it remains an important industry for the region during an annual Timber Tour last week.

Montana's forest product industry makes up nearly $300 million in salaries for 7,000 employees.

Timber Tour attendees visited an active forest management project on the Flathead National Forest, and explored both the challenges and opportunities surrounding a more niche timber market-specifically Wild Montana Logging.

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5. Weyerhaeuser CEO Doyle R. Simons Says Housing Stats on Path Out of the Woods

Arkansas Business.com (October 27) - In this interview with Arkansas Business, Weyerhaeuser president and chief executive officer Doyle R. Simons, says "Key drivers for a continuing housing recovery are employment and consumer confidence, both of which are experiencing steadily positive trajectories."

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6. ACLT: Some Loggers, Truckers Halt Delivery to Boise

IFallsJournal.com (October 29) - In what is being called a "reverse demonstration and silent protest," many loggers and truckers will not deliver wood to the Boise Paper, a Packaging Corporation of America, mill in International Falls Thursday (10/30) and Friday (10/31).

Officials with the Associated Contract Loggers and Truckers (ACLT) of Minnesota said the delivery interruption is in response to Boise's failure to "negotiate an adequate adjustment in the price paid to loggers for delivered wood," at the same time Boise's parent company, Packaging Corporation of America, "announced the eighth consecutive quarter of record earnings."

Although Boise Paper had no comment on the interruptions, the ACLT said the action "is necessary to demonstrate that, through solidarity, the loggers and truckers have the ability to influence the production and flow of timber to the mill."

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V. Biomass

1. Herty Announces Consortium for Advanced Wood-to-Energy Solutions

Georgia Southern.edu (October 29) - The Georgia Southern University Herty Advanced Materials Development Center, the US Endowment for Forestry and Communities, and the US Forest Service Forest Products Laboratory have announced the launch of the Consortium for Advanced Wood-to-Energy Solutions (CAWES).

The consortium's goal is to spearhead development of commercially viable, advanced wood-to-energy products that can be produced from low-value trees and forest residues that can compromise forest health and increase the frequency of wildfires.

The US Endowment and the Forest Service, via its State and Private Forestry division, have "jump started" the consortium with a $4 million investment designed to identify and fill critical research, development, and deployment needs in launching successful commercial biomass to energy products operations.

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2. Biomass Plant Wins Forestry Sourcing Certification

Gainesville.com (October 28) - The Gainesville Renewable Energy Center announced it is the first power plant in the country to receive the Forest Stewardship Council's chain-of-custody certification, affirming that its procedures for buying waste wood fuels conform to the FSC's standard.

The certification confirms the biomass plant uses stringent procedures allowing it to source its wood, which is used to generate power, with certainty as to where it comes from because it's able to trace the path of the materials from the forests through the supply chain.

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3. Environmental Group Criticizes Penns Valley Biomass Burner

CentreDaily.com (October 27) - The Partnership for Policy Integrity (PFPI), an environmental organization centered in Massachusetts and funded by the Pittsburgh-based Heinz Endowments, has released a report and database criticizing the Pennsylvania biomass energy industry.

One of the areas the PFPI is critical of, according to its report, is the types of fuels used in biomass burners. The five categories of fuel used are: mill residues, agricultural residues, energy crops, and "urban wood," such as construction and demolition waste and forest wood.

Urban wood, the report said, sometimes contains caustic chemicals that are released into the air along with the normal pollutants that come with burning wood.

The state Department of Environmental Protection could not be reached for comment by press time. The US Department of Energy strongly backs biomass energy, saying that biomass fuels and a bioeconomy will help the country's farms and woodlots and will be a source of major job growth over the next 15 years.

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4. Bioenergy Push Spurs Two New Wood Pellet Plants in Arkansas

Arkansas Business.com (October 27) - Europe's increasing emphasis on renewable energy lies behind the announcements this summer that two companies plan to build wood pellet plants in Arkansas, one in Pine Bluff and one in Monticello.

Demand for the pellets, which energy-producing companies in Europe use to generate electricity, led to a doubling of US exports of the pellets last year, from 1.6 million tons in 2012 to 3.2 million tons in 2013.

In July, Zilkha Biomass Energy LLC of Houston announced it would build a $90 million facility, creating 52 jobs in Monticello. In August, Highland Pellets LLC announced that it would build a $130 million plant in Pine Bluff, creating 35 jobs. Highland Pellets, incorporated and registered in Arkansas, is a subsidiary of Highland LLC of Boston.

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VI. Wildfire

1. Wildfire Risk to Stay High into December

VCStar.com (October 22) - The air might feel a bit cooler and days are shorter, but authorities say the risk of wildfires remains high. A seasonal outlook shows the potential for fires above normal in October, November, and likely into December throughout Southern California.

From Simi Valley to Ojai, moisture levels are considered critically dry and below average for this time of year. If the area gets some rain, it won't bring back the dead grass, brush, and chaparral.

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2. Fires and Floods: North Cascades Federal Lands Prepare for Climate Change

Washington.edu (October 29) - A new report from the US Forest Service, "Climate Change Vulnerability and Adaptation in the North Cascades Region, Washington," outlines work performed by agency personnel and scientists from the University of Washington to pinpoint natural resources sensitive to a warmer climate in the North Cascades region. It also offers detailed management responses to minimize the adverse impacts on land and in water.

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3. House Democrats Again Seek Vote on Wildfire Bill

Capitalpress.com (October 28) - Two prominent California Democrats are again pressuring the House of Representatives' Republican leadership to bring up a bill that would protect forest management in the federal wildfire disaster budget.

In a letter to House Speaker John Boehner and Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi, Rep. John Garamendi (D-CA) urged that House Resolution 3992 be considered in the lame-duck session.

The bill by Reps. Mike Simpson (R-ID) and Kurt Schrader, (D-OR) would force the US Forest Service and other agencies to use contingency money rather than dipping into the forest management account when firefighting costs balloon beyond appropriated levels.

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VII. Forest Pests

1. Long Island Confronts Destructive Southern Pine Beetles

New York times.com (October 29) - Southern pine beetles made their first appearance in New York in late September, when they were found on Long Island. Their discovery is evidence of their unceasing northward march and a result, scientists say, of increasingly balmy winters.

No one yet knows the extent of the invasion on Long Island, but according to the state Department of Environmental Conservation, the beetles have been found in three spots in Suffolk County: the Wertheim National Wildlife Refuge in Shirley, the Connetquot River State Park in Oakdale, and Henry's Hollow Pine Barrens State Forest in Hampton Bays.

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2. Chicago Tree Trimming Backlog Is Two Years

Chicago Tribune.com (October 28) - There's a tree-trimming backlog of about two years in Chicago, said Charles Williams, a top aide to Mayor Rahm Emanuel.

Williams, commissioner of the Department of Streets and Sanitation, offered the estimate during a break in City Council hearings on the mayor's proposed 2015 budget. Earlier, aldermen had pressed Williams on the issue of the tree-trimming backlog, which results in a lot of complaints from the people they represent.

Williams noted that the city has trimmed and removed more trees to date this year than it did last year, but that it also has faced a heavier burden because of the emerald ash borer and one particularly nasty storm.

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3. Emerald Ash Borer Detected in Monmouth, Kirkwood

ReviewAtlas.com (Illinois, October 25) - The emerald ash borer is an extremely invasive beetle originally native to Asia and Eastern Russia. The first confirmed presence of the pest in Warren County was discovered early this fall in Kirkwood.

At the same time, retired Western Illinois University urban forestry professor Tom Green and University of Illinois Extension horticulture educator Chris Enroth found the insect in a cluster of ash trees on the south side of the railroad tracks in Monmouth.

Based upon the size of the dead ash trees, Green estimated the ash borer has been in Monmouth a minimum of four years, but likely more.

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VIII. Water Resources

1. Arizona: Agreement Protects Forests near San Pedro River

AZ Central.com (October 29) - More than 600 acres of private land in one of the Southwest's most biologically diverse areas will be protected for migratory birds and other wildlife through new agreements with state and federal agencies.

The agencies announced that four properties along the lower San Pedro River in southern Arizona will remain undeveloped after the approval of conservation easements funded by the Forest Legacy Program. The final agreements between landowners and the US Forest Service, the Arizona State Forestry Division, and the Arizona Game and Fish Department were signed at the end of September.

More:

Private Landowners Join Fight to Preserve San Pedro River
SVHerald.com (October 29)

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2. Legislation in Works for Oregon Herbicide Spraying

OPB.org (October 27) - After talking about poor oversight of aerial herbicide spraying on Oregon forests, there's a chance state lawmakers might address it.

Rep. Ann Lininger said she has been working on legislation for the past six months along with Senate Environment and Natural Resources Committee Chairman Michael Dembrow and a team of legislators and community members. They plan to introduce a bill in the 2015 session.

Goals for the legislation include better notifications for community members; creating a publicly accessible database of pesticide application records; and wider buffers between aerial spraying and homes, schools, and drinking water streams.

The Senate committee has held a series of informational hearings since May in response to a case last year near Gold Beach. Dozens of residents in the community of Cedar Valley claimed herbicides sprayed from a helicopter made them and their pets sick. The pilot faces a $10,000 fine and the state is trying to revoke his license.

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3. Mature Forests Store Nitrogen in Soil: May Help Protect Waterways from Excess Nitrogen from Industry

ESA.org (October 22) - Ecologists working in central Pennsylvania forests have found that forest topsoils capture and stabilize the powerful fertilizer nitrogen quickly, within days, but release it slowly, over years to decades. The discrepancy in rates means that nitrogen can build up in soils. Forests may be providing an unappreciated service by storing excess nitrogen emitted by modern agriculture, industry, and transport before it can cause problems for our waterways.

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IX. Science & Research

1. Dreaming of Giants: The Future of American Chestnut Restoration

US Forest Service (October 21) - For almost a hundred years, foresters have dreamed of the American chestnut's return. Now, scientists with the US Forest Service's Southern Research Station (SRS) say the goal of restoration may be closer to reality.

"Chestnut restoration will require an integrated approach that uses traditional breeding, advanced seedling technology, and forest management," says Clark, research forester with the SRS's Upland Hardwood Ecology and Management Unit, and lead author of a new review article recently published in the Journal of Forestry that evaluates restoration efforts thus far and offers recommendations for the future.

More:

Efforts to Develop Blight-Resistant American Chestnut Trees Working
Ellwood City Ledger.com (October 29)

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2. Variation in Antibiotic Bacteria in Tropical Forest Soils May Play a Role in Diversity

Science Daily.com (October 28) - Antibiotic-producing bacteria in soil are the source of many antibiotics used to combat diseases in humans and plants. But, surprisingly little is known about how these microbes impact tropical plant communities and ecosystems, where plant diversity, competition, and pathogen pressures are high.

A study published October 28 in the journal Biotropica represents a step toward a better understanding of the role antibiotic-bacteria play in the ecology of tropical forests. University of Minnesota researchers, led by Kristen Becklund, found that antibiotic production by soil bacteria was widespread, but that the abundance and activity of the microbes varied across the landscape depending, in part, on nutrient availability.

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3. Study: Climate Change Will Make Wildfires Worse for Arizona, Nation

WMICentral.com (October 29) - Although Arizona's most recent fire season was relatively tame, one study-"Flammable Planet: Wildfires and the Social Cost of Carbon"-predicts larger, more frequent, more intense and more costly wildfires around the world by 2050, with the Southwest being affected in particular.

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X. Items of Interest

1. Forests a Fascination Since High School for Legislative Affairs Specialist

USDA.gov (October 28) - US Forest Service Legislative Affairs Specialist and SAF Member Katie Armstrong has been included among the individuals highlighted on the "Faces of the Forest" page on the Forest Service website.

The article discusses Armstrong's career path and the responsibilities associated with her position.

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2. UGA's Warnell School Honors Distinguished Alumni

UGA.edu (October 23) - The University of Georgia Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources recently recognized SAF member Claude Yearwood with its Distinguished Alumnus award.

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3. Ohio DNR Recognizes Outstanding Foresters

Clermontsun.com (October 23) - SAF member Jack Vimmerstedt was one of two outstanding foresters recently honored at a ceremony at Zaleski State Forest near McArthur. The Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) honored Vimmerstedt and his family with a tree planting ceremony at the ODNR Division of Forestry's Forest of Honor.

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4. Retiring Ranger Wonders Who Will Keep the "Wild" in Wilderness

Helenair.com (October 27) - As she prepares to retire after 35 seasons as Mission Mountains Wilderness ranger, Kari Gunderson plans to keep a close eye on the wild qualities that give the Missions "outstanding opportunities for solitude or a primitive and unconfined type of recreation" as written in the Wilderness Act of 1964.

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XII. SAF News

1. 2014 SAF Elections Ballot

As you know, the 2014 SAF national and unit elections and referendum votes will be held in October. All SAF members will receive a ballot and are encouraged to vote. Please be aware, though, that there is an important change to the ballot.

After receiving comments from members about consequences of consolidating SAF's membership categories, the Council decided to withdraw those questions from the ballot. A letter from President Dave Walters explaining this decision can be found on the SAF website.

Council representatives are committed to talking with as many SAF members as possible about the rationale for consolidating the membership categories. If you are already engaged with the Council, thank you. If not, please speak your mind. The Council wants to hear your thoughts on how to increase SAF's relevance to every natural-resources professional who works in or is closely associated with forestry.

Please don't hesitate to contribute your insights, experience, and wisdom on this issue. Here's how you can do so:

  • Share your thoughts with us at membershipdialog@safnet.org
  • Talk to your Council member or your state society, division, or chapter leadership
  • Join SAF discussions on LinkedIn
  • Submit a letter to the editor of The Forestry Source (send letters to editor Steve Wilent at wilents@safnet.org).

If you have any questions on the votes, please feel free to contact SAF chief executive officer Matt Menashes.

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2. Be Sure You Receive Your 2014 Election Ballot

This year SAF is using a new vendor for the national and local unit elections. To ensure your ballot is received and accepted by your e-mail server, be sure to save the following e-mail address to your contacts before October 1: saf@intelliscaninc.net.

Members that do not have an e-mail address listed with SAF will still receive a paper ballot.

If you have any questions, please contact SAF chief executive officer Matt Menashes at (866) 897-8720, ext. 120.

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3. SAF Launches New Membership Portal

In response to members' concerns about the functionality of the SAF website, the Society has launched a beta version of its new Membership Portal. Naturally, we want to know what you think about it, so check it out and send us your comments.

The portal is designed to offer easier access to SAF member services, expedite the renewal process, provide up-to-date information about members' involvement with SAF (e.g., CFE credits, subscriptions, and so on), give the latest forestry news, facilitate giving, and more!

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4. Renew Your SAF Membership for 2015

Be sure to renew your SAF membership for 2015 or risk being cut off from the SAF products and services you enjoy, such as reading the latest forestry-related news with The Forestry Source, learning about the latest in forest research in the Journal of Forestry,* find your competitive edge with the nation's largest listing of continuing forestry education.

But wait, there's more! Your membership in SAF also gives you access to: the SAF Career Center, the SAF Store, discounted rates on Consulting and Prescribed Fire Insurance, discounted rates on automotive insurance, Certified Forester discounts, discounted life and disability insurance, and discounts and rewards with 1,000+ retailers!

Become a platinum member and receive even more benefits, including three free Continuing Education Quizzes from the Journal of Forestry (a $90 value).

Need Help?

  • If you need assistance, call (866) 897-8720 x100 or e-mail membership@safnet.org
  • Monthly Payments: Split your total membership dues into equal monthly payments for the rest of the year. Select "monthly" on your online checkout or call us.

Submit payment by check, just print the e-mail confirmation after joining online and send your payment to SAF at 5400 Grosvenor Lane, Bethesda, MD 20814-2198. Or, fax your payment, print the e-mail confirmation and fax your payment to (301) 897-3690. You can also make your payment over the phone by calling (866) 897-8720 x100.

Note: All memberships are calendar year. *Not eligible with Silver Membership Service Level.

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5. Research You May Be Missing

Interested in what your colleagues have been reading? Below are the top most downloaded articles from each of SAF's scientific journal publications for the month of September.

A Practical Approach for Translating Climate Change Adaptation Principles into Forest Management Actions
(Journal of Forestry Vol. 112, No. 5)

Mountain Pine Beetle, a Major Disturbance Agent in US Western Coniferous Forests: A Synthesis of the State of Knowledge
(Forest Science Vol. 60, No. 3)

To see the complete top 10 most downloaded article lists, visit the Publications page on the SAF website, click on the journal you wish to view, then click "Most Downloaded Articles."

Your GOLD- or PLATINUM-level membership entitles you to free access to all journal content, but you need to register with IngentaConnect to get it.

Questions? Contact Matthew Walls

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About The E-Forester:

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