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July 18, 2014


E-Forester Archives? More than a few folks have asked if The E-Forester is archived on the SAF website. It is not, primarily because links to news articles change quickly. However, if you're looking for something from a past issue, contact me and I'll do my best to get you what you need.

I. Featured News

1. Old-Growth Gurus Talk about Growing Forests for the Future
2. Is Cable Logging on the Horizon in Flagstaff?
3. Ash Borer in Kentucky and Ontario, Thousand Cankers in Oregon
4. Are Herbicides to Blame for Region's Hoof Rot Woes?
5. Wildfire News

Forest Products Industry

6. Forest Still Drives Aspen-Area Economy, Oregon Timber Harvest Tops 4 Billion Board Feet
7. Industry News: Climate Hub Tool Could Push Southeast Timber, Loggers Ordered to Report Water Used in Dust Control, and CatchMark to Boost Timber Holdings
8. Biomass News

Federal Lands Management

9. SAF Forest Policy News
10. Wildfire Preparedness and the Forest Service 2015 Fiscal Year Budget
11. House to Vote on Permanent Conservation Incentive
12. Forest in Focus in Montana and Working Forest Projects in Vermont
13. Groups Sue over Logging in Sierra Nevada Fire Areas

II. Publications, Resources, and Items of Interest

1. SAF Members in the News
2. AF&PA: US Paper and Wood Products Manufacturers Show Significant Progress toward Sustainability Goals
3. Purdue Publication Offers Resources for Urban Woodlots Owners, Summer 2014 Forests without Borders Newsletter Now Available

III. Science and Technology

1. Researchers Using Bugs to Fight Invasive Plant in Rhode Island
2. Study Shows Tree Canopy Shrinking in Georgia
3. Research You May Be Missing

IV. SAF News

1. 2014 IUFRO World Congress Seeks Volunteer Manager
2. National Committee Openings Available
3. 2014 SAF Convention News-Info on Everything from Airfare to Presentations
4. SAF Selects Bob Deal as Editor of The Dictionary of Forestry
5. Picture the Past


I. Featured News

All of these items and more appear in the "Featured News" section on the SAF home page

1. Old-Growth Gurus Talk about Growing Forests for the Future

Northcoast Journal.com (July 17) - About 70 people recently gathered at Humboldt State University (HSU) for a discussion with two "gurus" of the old growth forest realm: Stephen Sillett, professor and Kenneth L. Fisher Chair in Redwood Forest Ecology at HSU, and Jerry Franklin, professor of ecosystem analysis at the University of Washington-Seattle.

Led by the Pacific Forest Trust, the discussion focused on how forest stewardship can promote old-growth functions that benefit "climate, wildlife, water, and a sustained resource economy."

But both scientists agreed to the concept of restoring the complexity of forests, especially where long-term fire suppression has upset the forest balance. On the subject of carbon sequestration, Franklin suggested that forest managers adopt longer rotations between selective harvests and that the oldest, biggest trees be left alone.

Sillett suggested rethinking the rotation concept altogether, and looking instead at individual tree selection, while leaving the big trees be. He and his team are studying the effects of thinning the areas around big trees and have found that the big trees' rates of growth skyrocket afterward.

For more on Jerry Franklin and his vision of an "ecological forestry" on federal lands in Oregon, visit the archives of The Forestry Source.

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2. Is Cable Logging on the Horizon in Flagstaff?

AZ Daily Sun.com (July 15) - The hillsides and steep slopes north of Flagstaff could soon be home to cable and helicopter logging, culling techniques alien to the small timber forests of northern Arizona.

Both are included in the draft plan published by the US Forest Service last week to deal with the threat of wildfire in Flagstaff's watersheds.

The agency is now looking to residents for help in drafting the final version of that plan. If residents aren't supportive of the aggressive treatment efforts, the city wouldn't be as protected from wildfire and the flooding that follows. If residents do go for cable and helicopter logging, it could alter the beauty of the area and increase runoff in the short term.

More:

Logging among Alternatives Considered to Protect Flagstaff, Watershed from Fire, Flooding

Greenfield Reporter.com (July 15) - The use of cables and helicopters to drag and lift logs from forested slopes are among the alternatives under consideration by Coconino National Forest officials to protect Flagstaff from wildfire and its watershed from flooding.

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3. Ash Borer in Kentucky and Ontario, Thousand Cankers in Oregon

Ash Borer Blamed for Wiping Out Ash Trees in Kentucky

The Republic.com (July 11) - The emerald ash borer has started taking a toll on ash trees in Kentucky. From Lexington to Louisville and north to Cincinnati, ash trees are being wiped out from rural landscapes, parks, subdivisions, and urban corridors, according to The Courier-Journal.

By 2012, the borer had begun to wreak havoc on Jefferson County's sizable ash population, and local tree advocates were calling on the city to mount a vigorous fight, with mixed results. Estimates are that Jefferson County alone has 2.5 million ash trees, making up 10 to 17 percent of the county's tree canopy.

More:

Ash Borer Extending Range in Ontario
Owen Sound Sun Times.com (July 15)

Twig Beetle Killing Black Walnut Trees in Oregon

KOIN.com (July 14) - There is not a huge commercial market for black walnuts in Oregon, but the trees that are present in the state were planted by Oregon's original settlers. As a result, they are often huge, sprawling shade makers with both historical and sentimental value to the people who own them.

Now, the black walnut trees are quickly dying off by a fungus called Thousand Cankers Disease.

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4. Are Herbicides to Blame for Region's Hoof Rot Woes?

TDN.com (July 16) - For timber companies, herbicides are a crucial tool. Typically, companies spray herbicides on areas that have been clearcut to kill plants that compete with newly planted conifers for water, sun, and nutrients. Spraying typically occurs one or two more times in the first few years after replanting.

Now, a growing number of people asking whether the use of herbicides on private timberlands is related to hoof disease in elk and horses.

Herbicide experts who are advising the state Department of Fish and Wildlife have said there's no evidence that herbicides used on forestland have any direct harmful effects on elk or other animals.

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5. Wildfire News

NIFC.gov (July 16) - As of July 16, the National Interagency Fire Center reported that, "The National Preparedness Level (PL) increased to PL3 yesterday afternoon due to a spike in large fire activity in Oregon, Washington, and Idaho. Nine new large fires were reported today-seven in Oregon and one each in Texas and Washington. Fire managers continue to watch weather forecasts closely and are prepared for predicted hot and windy conditions in the Pacific Northwest.

"Extreme fire behavior was observed on many fires. The Buzzard fire gained 5,000 acres, the Saddle Draw fire increased by 9,000 acres, and the Preacher fire burned more than 27,000 acres yesterday. Several fires are threatening homes and the residents near the Chiwaukum Creek, Waterman Complex, Shaniko Butte, and Whiskey Complex fires have been evacuated."

In other wildfire news:

Hundreds of Homes Threatened by Washington Wildfire
Associated Press (July 17)

Gov. John Kitzhaber Declares State of Emergency to Battle Oregon Wildfires
Oregonlive.com (July17)

McCain Files Bill to Replace Obama's Wildfire Funding Request
Tucson Sentinel.com (July 14)

Campaign Launched to Shift Forest Firefighting Costs
Wyofile.com (July 15)

Firefighters Focus on Four Large Fires in Boise County; One Sparks Voluntary Evacuation
Idaho Statesman.com (July 14)

Northern California Wildfire Races through Bone-Dry Landscape
LA Times.com (July 15)

Evacuations Persist as Bully Fire Grows to 8,100 Acres
Redding.com (July 15)

Lightning Sparks Fast-Growing Wildfires in Washington State
Weather.com (July 16)

Lessons Emerge from Nebraska Wildfire
Norfolk Daily News.com (July 15)

Disneytoon Studios Worked Closely with CalFire to Make "Planes: Fire & Rescue" as Authentic as Possible
Huffington Post.com (July 16)

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Forest Products Industry

6. Forest Still Drives Aspen-Area Economy, Oregon Timber Harvest Tops 4 Billion Board Feet

Report Documents How Forest Still Drives Aspen-Area Economy

Post-Independent.com (July 13) - Timber sales were up, gas production was down, livestock grazing was steady, and tourism continued to be the dominant use on the White River National Forest last year.

The forest supervisor's office recently released its 2013 Annual Report, highlighting how the 2.28 million acres of public land was used. The White River National Forest surrounds Aspen and is intermingled with private lands throughout Pitkin County.

Oregon Timber Harvest Tops 4 Billion Board Feet

Statesman Journal.com (July 16) - Oregon's timber harvest topped 4 billion board feet last year, the first time it has reached that level since 2006, according to a state report released earlier this week.

The 4.2 billion board feet harvested in 2013 represents a 12 percent increase from the year before and marks the fourth consecutive year of increases since the recession low of 2.7 billion board feet in 2009.

The state Department of Forestry said in its annual harvest report that the increase can be chalked up to a strong export market and a domestic housing recovery.

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7. Industry News: Climate Hub Tool Could Push Southeast Timber, Loggers Ordered to Report Water Used in Dust Control, and CatchMark to Boost Timber Holdings

Climate Hub Tool Could Push Southeast's Timber Industry Forward

Bizjournals.com (July 15) - The timber industry is on an upswing and a new tool rolled out by the US Forest Service could give it an extra boost.

Ever since the creation of the USDA Southeast Regional Climate Hub in Raleigh, the region has led the nation in timber production and sales. However, competition with South America and Canada drove production down in the past decade.

Logging Companies Ordered to Report Water Use in Controlling Dust

SacBee.com (July 5) - Logging companies in the Sierra Nevada and elsewhere in California will now be required to report how much water they extract from streams for dust control.

The California Board of Forestry adopted the emergency regulations in response to the drought. The action arose from concerns that very low water flows in many mountain streams could be further depleted by water extractions related to logging.

CatchMark to Boost Timberland Holdings

Bizjournals.com (July 8) - CatchMark Timber Trust Inc. will buy 55,671 acres of timberlands in two transactions for $106 million.

The Atlanta-based real estate investment trust reported that about 95 percent of the acreage is in middle and south Georgia and North Florida. The two transactions, known as Oglethorpe and Satilla River, are expected to close during the third quarter.

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8. Biomass News

Shrub Willow: Woody Biomass Being Turned into a Renewable Energy Source

TWCNews.com (July 16) - A shrub willow is a fast-growing source of woody biomass that's being turned into a renewable energy resource.

According to Timothy Volk of the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry, this past year there were about 2,500 tons of willow that were harvested off fields that are growing in northern New York and delivered to one of the ReEnergy facilities to produce renewable electricity.

New developments in technology have substantially reduced the cost of harvesting the shrub willow by a little more than 30 percent, and improved the quality of the wood chips.

KiOR on the Block?

Jackson Free Press.com (July 16) - Fully cashing in on the green energy revolution continues to elude Mississippi as a company that state officials-including former Gov. Haley Barbour-helped fund with state money is considering putting itself up for sale.

On July 9, in a filing with the Security and Exchange Commission, Pasadena, Texas-based KiOR said it retained Guggenheim Securities, LLC to "assist the company in reviewing and evaluating various financing, transactional, and strategic alternatives, including a possible merger, restructuring, or sale" of the four-year-old company.

Drax Biomass to Move Headquarters to Georgia

Biomass Magazine.com (July 11) - Drax Biomass is moving its headquarters to the Atlanta, Georgia, suburb of Sandy Springs. The Georgia Department of Economic Development made the announcement July 8, adding that Drax Biomass will invest more than $1 million in the state to lease 10,000 square feet in the Concourse building in Sandy Springs for seven years. Drax Biomass, a subsidiary of UK-based Drax Group, PLC is currently based in Burlington, Massachusetts.

DOE Awards $6 Million to Advance Cost-Competitive Biofuels

Biomass Magazine.com (July 15) - The US Department of Energy has announced $6 million for two projects to develop next-generation biofuels that will help drive down the cost of producing gasoline, diesel, and jet fuels from biomass. The research and development projects, located in California and North Carolina, will focus on lowering production costs by maximizing the renewable carbon and hydrogen from biomass that can be converted to fuels, and improving the separation processes in bio-oil production to remove nonfuel components. These projects are a part of the Energy Department's continued effort to develop technologies that will enable the production of clean, renewable, and cost-competitive drop-in biofuels at $3 per gallon by 2017.

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Federal Lands Management

9. SAF Forest Policy News

SAF Praises Governor's Actions to Strengthen Forester Licensing in Michigan

The Society of American Foresters (SAF) is praising Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder's rejection of legislation that would have eliminated Michigan's Registered Forester program.

Initially a proponent of deregulation, Snyder changed his position on the matter after consultations with members of the state's forestry community, including the Michigan SAF.

SAF Releases Position Statements on Wildland Fire Management, Herbicide Use on Forestlands

Wildland Fire Management

Our nation's forests and communities need protection from wildfire that is reliable, consistent, and cost effective while providing for public and firefighter safety. Although fire plays a role in nearly all forest ecosystems, the average size, frequency, and severity of wildfires is increasing and that trend should be reversed. The Society of American Foresters (SAF) recognizes that more than 98 percent of all wildfires are effectively controlled (Tidwell 2012), and believes there are four inextricably related issues that must be addressed to reduce the average size of wildfires and their undesirable effects. First, it is our position that the pace and scale of management activities, especially hazardous fuels treatments, must be accelerated to restore fire-adapted forested landscapes. Second, where appropriate, direct fire suppression resources to control fires quickly and safely to prevent destructive large fire events. Third, develop fire-adapted and resilient communities by cross-boundary coordination between homeowners, communities, and local, state, and federal government efforts. Last, sufficient and stable federal firefighting budgets must be available to avoid disrupting other essential programs, especially increased investment in presuppression activities related to hazardous fuel reduction. Congress continues to explore options to fix this fundamental issue and SAF supports those efforts.

Herbicide Use on Forestlands

The Society of American Foresters supports the availability and judicious use of herbicides as an effective and vital tool for controlling undesired vegetation as a component of an integrated management strategy for forestlands. SAF believes that the use of herbicides, applied in accordance with federal and state regulations to achieve a desired site condition or management objective, is a safe and effective approach for managing undesired vegetation. In addition to helping facilitate reforestation and improve forest productivity, herbicide use is now a particularly important management option for addressing the serious and growing problem of native and nonnative invasive plant species on forestlands.

To read the position statements in full, visit the Forest Policy page on the SAF website.

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10. Wildfire Preparedness and the Forest Service 2015 Fiscal Year Budget

Senate.gov (July 15) - The Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resource held a hearing on July 15 to explore wildland fire preparedness and to consider the President's Proposed Budget for Fiscal Year 2015 for the US Forest Service.

Among the witnesses providing testimony at the hearing were Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA), Sen. John McCain (R-AZ), Sen. Mike Crapo (R-ID), Ken Pimlott, Director, California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, Tom Tidwell, Chief, US Forest Service, and Kim Thorsen, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Public Safety, Resource Protection, and Emergency Services, Department of the Interior

To view an archived webcast of the hearing, or to read witness testimony, visit the committee's website.

To read news coverage of the hearing, see the following:

Administration Asks Congress to Revamp Fire Spending
Bend Bulletin.com (July 16)

US Wildfire Policy Inadequate, Senators Agree
The Californian.com (July 16)

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11. House to Vote on Permanent Conservation Incentive

Capital Press.com (July 15) - The House of Representatives is set to vote July 17 on a bill-the Rural Heritage Conservation Extension Act of 2013-to make permanent the enhanced tax incentive for conservation of farmland, rangeland, woodlands, and open spaces first passed in 2006.

The incentive allows people who derive most of their income from agriculture or forestry to deduct up to 100 percent of their adjusted gross income annually from income taxes for 16 years.

For a summary and the text of the bill, visit the website of the Senate's Committee on Finance.

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12. Forest in Focus in Montana and Working Forest Projects in Vermont

It's "All Hands on Deck" for Governor's Initiative on Restoration of Forests

HelenaIR.com (July 13) - Citing the aftermath of a years-long mountain pine beetle epidemic and stalled forestry projects on federal lands, last week Gov. Steve Bullock announced his "Forests in Focus" initiative aimed at increasing the speed and scale of work on state, private, and federal forests.

With Bullock's interest in expediting forestry work in the state, it has taken Department in Natural Resources Conservation a while to catch up, said department director John Tubbs. The state agency has shifted to policies such as prefunding fighting fires and funding Forest Service personnel to speed up environmental review processes. The initiative puts the governor's vision in practice, he said.

More:

Sawmill Owner, Conservation Writer React to Governor's Forests Initiative
NBC Montana.com (July 17)

Two Vermont Working Forest Projects Funded under Leahy-Authored Program

Leahy.Senate.Gov (July 11) - Senator Patrick Leahy has announced funding for two Vermont Forest Legacy projects that will conserve critical forestlands in the Groton Forest Legacy Initiative and Windham Region Working Forest.

The two projects, when completed, will total more than 11,600 acres of conserved forestland in Vermont that will permanently protect wildlife habitat linkages and wildlife corridors. These projects also preserve public access, including hiking, hunting, fishing, cross-country skiing, and designated trails for snowmobiles.

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13. Groups Sue over Logging in Sierra Nevada Fire Areas

KCET.org (July 11) - Plans to log over 5,000 acres of burned trees in the Tahoe and Sierra National Forests poses a serious threat to wildlife that depends on burned-over forests. That's according to two environmental groups that sued the US Forest Service to stop the cut.

The lawsuit, filed in federal District Court in San Francisco by the Center for Biological Diversity and Earth Island Institute, charges that the Forest Service's plans to allow "salvage" timber cutting on land burned in two fires in summer 2013 will damage some of the Sierra Nevada's rarest habitat.

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II. Publications, Resources, and Items of Interest

1.SAF Members in the News

MSU Student Honored for Forest Fire Research

Clarion Ledger.com (July 12) - The Association of Fire Ecology recently honored Mississippi State University senior forestry major Zach Senneff with the Harold Weaver Undergraduate Student Excellence Award. The award is granted to a single student each year from a global pool of students pursuing research in fire ecology.

Senneff, who is now doing a summer internship at Weyerhaeuser, investigated the flammability of leaf litter from 10 hardwood species common to the eastern United States. In fire-prone ecosystems, flammable leaf litter kills competing trees.

UAM Forestry Dean to Head Southern Region of National Association of University Forest Resources Programs

Saline River Chronicle.blogspot.com (July 11) - Phil Tappe, dean of the School of Forest Resources at the University of Arkansas-Monticello and director of the Arkansas Forest Resources Center of the UA Division of Agriculture, has been elected chair of the southern region of the National Association of University Forest Resources Programs.

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2. AF&PA: US Paper and Wood Products Manufacturers Show Significant Progress toward Sustainability Goals

AFandPA.org (July 15) - The American Forest & Paper Association (AF&PA) has released its 2014 Sustainability Report, which exhibits the US pulp, paper, packaging, and wood products industry's significant contributions to sustainability across the value chain, including measurable progress toward achieving its "Better Practices, Better Planet 2020" sustainability goals.

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3. Purdue Publication Offers Resources for Urban Woodlots Owners, Summer 2014 Forests without Borders Newsletter Now Available

Purdue Publication Offers Resources for Urban Woodlots Owners

Purdue.edu - A new Purdue Extension publication gives owners of Indiana urban woodlots crucial information they need to best manage and care for these environmentally important forest areas.

The free, 24-page booklet Indiana's Urban Woodlots is meant to make owning and managing urban woodlots less intimidating and help owners enhance their experiences with their land while reaping the benefits of the property. The publication covers topics such as the benefits of trees, laws and zoning, stewardship planning, management, and planting and renewal.

Summer 2014 Forests without Borders Newsletter Now Available

The Summer 2014 issue of the Canadian Institute of Forestry's Forests without Borders newsletter is now available. Among the contents of this issue are:

Community Forest in Northern Cameroon Complete
Help Make a Real Difference in the Live of People - Adopt a Village
Cameroon Report
Small Is Beautiful
Engaging Young People to Understand Conservation Challenges
Progress in Nepal's School Tree Nurseries
FwB Summer Interns in Nepal
Planting Underway in Uganda

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III. Science and Technology

1. Researchers Using Bugs to Fight Invasive Plant in Rhode Island

Patch.com (July 15) - The mile-a-minute vine, an invasive from the Far East that has taken root in several Rhode Island communities, has a new enemy thanks to URI researchers: hundreds of tiny weevils.

More:

RI Scientist Leads Fight against Invasive Mile-a-Minute Vine
Providence Journal.com (July 12)

For additional information on the mile-a-minute weevil research, visit the website of the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources at the University of Delaware.

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2. Study Shows Tree Canopy Shrinking in Georgia

Savannah Now.com (July 15) - Three football fields-That's how much tree canopy Chatham County lost every day on average over the last 15 years, a new analysis commissioned by the Savannah Tree Foundation.

Most of that tree cover disappeared from Pooler, Port Wentworth, Bloomingdale, and west Savannah, where developers razed pine plantations as well as natural hardwood forests to make way for houses, parking lots, warehouses, and businesses.

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3. Research You May Be Missing

Interested in what your colleagues have been reading? Below are the top most downloaded articles from each of SAF's scientific journal publications for the month of May.

Twenty Years of Forest Service Land Management Litigation (Journal of Forestry Vol. 112, No. 1)

Sustainability of the Selection System in Northern Hardwood Forests (Forest Science Vol. 60, No. 2)

To see the complete top 10 most downloaded article lists, visit the publications page and click on the journal you wish to view, then click Most Downloaded Articles.

Your GOLD- or PLATINUM-level membership entitles you to free access to all journal content, but you need to register with IngentaConnect to get it.

Questions? Contact Matthew Walls

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IV. SAF News

1. 2014 IUFRO World Congress Seeks Volunteer Manager

The 2014 International Union of Forest Research Organizations (IUFRO) World Congress will take place October 5-11, 2014 in Salt Lake City, Utah. The 2014 SAF National Convention and CIF/IFC AGM & Conference will take place October 8-11, 2014 in the same venue.

The success of these combined events is contingent on the success of securing a large number of volunteers serving in numerous capacities, including some with specific skill sets. To support the success of the volunteer organization for the event, the organizers seek to secure the services of an experienced volunteer management organization or service contractor. The position will require minimal work prior to the actual event, and a significant time commitment from October 4 to 11, 2014 as onsite event volunteer manager.

To apply send a cover letter detailing your management approach (i.e., how would you approach this project organizationally), a summary of relevant experience and three past performance references, and salary and expense requirements to:

Jennifer Hayes, 2014 IUFRO World Congress Project Manager, (970) 498-1365.

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2. National Committee Openings Available

SAF currently has 13 national committees to help it accomplish its ongoing and long-term goals. If you'd like to volunteer your time and talents to help SAF meet its mission, see the list of committee openings in the July issue of The Forestry Source, available on the SAF website.

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3. 2014 SAF Convention News-Info on Everything from Airfare to Presentations

SAF 2014 Advance Convention Brochure Now Available!

The 2014 SAF National Convention advance brochure, which has information on everything you need to know about this year's joint SAF/CIF meeting, is now available on the SAF website. Check it out!

Complete Scientific and Technical Concurrent Program Now Online

The complete scientific and technical concurrent program for this year's convention is available online.

Volunteers Needed

Planning to attend the SAF/CIF convention or the IUFRO World Congress? Consider donating a few hours of your time to help the logistics of the co-located conferences run more smoothly!

SAF and CIF/IFC need volunteers to help with the Forests without Borders / Foresters and Science Fund silent auction and the SAF Store, as well as for these specific jobs, which are being coordinated by IUFRO:

Registration Area (greeters, bag and proceedings distribution, etc.)
Wed 06.30-10.30 - 6 people
Wed 10.30-2.30 - 6 people
Wed 2.30-6.30 - 8 people
Thurs 6.30-10.30 - 3 people
Thurs 10.30-2.30 - 2 people

Exhibit Hall
Wed 6.30-10.30 - 2 people
Wed 10.30-2.30 - 2 people

Hot Shots
Wed 6.00am - 09.00 - 2 people
Thurs, Fri, Sat - 7.00am -noon - 2 people
Thurs, Fri, Sat - noon - 5.00 - 2 people

Sign up to volunteer in any position on the convention website - click Volunteer for SAF/CIF on the right hand side of the page.

Special Discounted Air Travel to Convention!
Salt Lake City has a large international airport and travel to and from this location can be direct through a number of other international airports across the country. SAF/CIF have formed a partnership with Delta and American Airlines to offer discounted airfare for convention attendees.

To Book Your Flight with Delta Airlines:

Visit the Delta website, select "Book A Trip," click on "More Search Options," and enter the meeting event code (NMHSJ) in the box provided on the Search Flight page. Reservations may also be made by calling Delta Meeting reservations at 1-800-328-1111 Monday-Friday 7am-7pm CDT.

To Book Your Flight with American Airlines:

Visit the American Airlines website, select your flight options, use discount code 79H4BR, and select "Book Now" to make your fight reservation.

Note: To avoid a ticketing charge, make your American Airline reservations online.

For comprehensive convention travel information, visit the SAF Convention website.

Book Your Hotel Room Early

Go to the SAF convention website and click on the "Reservations" link.

2014 SAF/CIF Call for Posters

In 2014, SAF will partner with the Canadian Institute of Forestry/l'Institut forestier du Canada (CIF/IFC) for our national convention. In addition, the convention will be co-located with the International Union of Forest Research Organizations (IUFRO) World Congress.

Click here for more information about the 2014 convention. Click here for information on submitting a poster abstract.

Poster submissions deadline: September 1, 2014

And finally …

Complete Scientific and Technical Concurrent Program Now Online

The complete scientific and technical concurrent program for this year's convention is available online.

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4. SAF Selects Bob Deal as Editor of The Dictionary of Forestry

SAF is pleased to announce the selection of Robert L. Deal as the next editor of The Dictionary of Forestry. Deal is a research forester and ecosystem services team leader with the US Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station in Portland, Oregon. Deal also holds a number of leadership positions within SAF, including as decision sciences subject area representative for E-working groups on the Forest Science & Technology Board, associate editor of silviculture for the Journal of Forestry, and past editor-in-chief of the Western Journal of Applied Forestry. Deal was elected SAF Fellow in 2009.

Bob Deal succeeds John A. Helms, who was the original editor of the dictionary from its creation in 1998 through its evolution into the current online edition at www.dictionaryofforestry.org, established in 2008.

In support of this vision, Deal is seeking volunteers to serve as reviewers and subject area representatives on a newly established dictionary editorial board. To volunteer, please contact Deal. Suggestions for new terms or revisions to existing definitions can be submitted through the online dictionary.

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5. Picture the Past

Forestry has an incredible visual legacy, but countless images now reside in archival obscurity or are moldering in closets or storage buildings. The Journal of Forestry has created an opportunity to preserve and share these images in a new feature, "Picture the Past," and invites you to contribute your images and related stories to remind us of our shared heritage and the lessons learned over the last century.

Guidelines for "Picture the Past" contributions can be found here, and examples can be found in the January and March issues. Submit your photo and related story online or by email to Matthew Walls.

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About The E-Forester:

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The E-Forester is sent to SAF members in good standing each week.

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