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July 31, 2015

2015 SAF National Convention Registration in Now Open!
Join us in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, November 3-7 and be part of the discussion on the trends, influences, and technologies that are shaping the profession in the 21st century!

 


For the latest forestry news, see the "Forestry News" section of the SAF homepage.

In This Issue ...

I. Featured News

1. South Carolina: A New Strategy to Help Heirs Keep Family Lands
2. Colorado: Taking Action to Manage Beetle Kill in Area Forests
3. Montana: International Land Managers Visit Bitterroot Conservancy Site
4. California: Firefighters Declare Dead Trees Public Nuisance
5. Wildfire News

II. Federal Lands Management

1. The Way We Pay for Wildfires Could Be Making Them Worse
2. Forest Service Next Generation Air Tanker Takes to the Air
3. Revisiting Timber Sales in the Shawnee National Forest
4. 20,000 Comments Boil Down to Four Main Issues in Flathead Forest Plan Revision
5. Forest Service's Regional Forester Visits LBL, Talks Pisgah "Pause"

III. International Forestry News

1. A Little-Known Big Producer: Will Forest Policy Reform in Peru Support Farm-Forestry?
2. Japanese Forester Says Greater Use of Wood Needed to Help Protect Nation's Forests
3. Discovering Untapped Value in Europe's Forests

IV. Forest Products Industry

1. Developer Breaks Ground on All-Timber Office Building in Minneapolis
2. Collins Celebrates Milestone as Kane Hardwood Division Completes 20 Years of FSC Forest Management Certification
3. Forestry Developers Voice Displeasure during Offset Workshop
4. Rayonier CEO Says REIT Benefits from Diversification of Timber Markets
5. Canada: Kenora Forest Products Is Restarting This Fall; White River Forest Products Makes Improvements; Report Chides TimberWest

V. Biomass

1. When Is a Tree "Waste" and Why It Matters for the Clean Power Plan
2. Greenleaf Acquires Plainfield Renewable Energy Facility in Connecticut
3. Industry Checkoff Program Development Discussed at PFI Conference
4. Watching Wood Dry
5. New Holland, SUNY Partner on Biomass Research

VI. Urban Forestry

1. What We've Lost: The Community Impact of Invasive Species
2. Utility Says It Cut Hundreds of Trees to Protect Power for Thousands of People
3. The Giving Trees

VII. Plants and Pests

1. Invasive Beetle Costs Pittsburgh-Area Power Companies Plenty
2. Emerald Ash Borer Would Hurt Mississippi Forestry Economy
3. Pennsylvania: Berks County Prepares for Gypsy Moth Invasion

VIII. Science and Research

1. Fire Surprise: Insect-Killed Forests No More Likely to Burn
2. Tree Rings and Plant Surveys: Scientists Map Intensity of Northwest Territory's Forest Fires
3. For Loblolly Pines, A Fertilization and Water Scarcity Paradox

IX. Items of Interest

1. Biologists, Officials Are Rattled over Ohio Snakes
2. Retired Foresters' Book Discusses Role of Ponderosa Pine in the West
3. Dovetail Issues Report on the Role of Cooperatives in Forestry

X. SAF News

1. SAF Media Moments
2. Earn CFEs for Your Reviews
3. Apply Now for 2015 SAF Diversity Scholarships
4. 2015 SAF National Convention News
5. SAF Store Sale Item of the Week: SAF Cap


I. Featured News

1. South Carolina: A New Strategy to Help Heirs Keep Family Lands

PostandCourier.com (July 25) - In Moncks Corner, South Carolina, the Manigault family has a new strategy for keeping its land productive-and in their own hands. They have begun managing it as a forest, with the help of the Center for Heirs Property's sustainable forestry program. The center launched the program after receiving a grant from the US Endowment for Forestry and Communities in 2013.

And in other South Carolina news:

Nature Conservancy Protects More than 12,000 Acres near the Savannah River

TheState.com (July 28) - The Nature Conservancy has purchased a conservation easement on 12,418 acres between the Savannah and Coosawhatchie Rivers.

The easement, on the Westervelt Company's timberlands near the towns of Allendale and Hampton, is the fourth largest in state history and the largest since 2008.

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2. Colorado: Taking Action to Manage Beetle Kill in Area Forests

Crestedbuttenews.com (July 30) - In 2005, Crested Butte resident Jeff Moffett looked up at the Douglas fir trees surrounding his property and noticed a lot of brown needles. Eventually, he determined that bark beetles had infested the Douglas fir.

He started doing research and learned about a state-funded grant program that provided funds for thinning and forest management. After what he calls a crash course in thinning, he set about selectively removing trees from his land, getting rid of infested trees, and helping the healthy trees thrive.

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3. Montana: International Land Managers Visit Bitterroot Conservancy Site

Bitterrootstar.com (July 28) - Land managers from 16 countries recently made a stop in the Bitterroot Valley to learn how voluntary conservation easements are enhancing a community's values.

The visitors were participants in a US Forest Service program, the International Seminar on Protected Area Management, which is designed to stimulate deliberations and interactive problem solving on issues related to protected-area and natural-resources management.

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4. California: Firefighters Declare Dead Trees Public Nuisance

Lakeconews.com (July 29) - Firefighters in Mendocino County filed a citizen initiative that addresses the danger posed by the forest management practice of killing undesirable hardwood trees and leaving them standing dead in the forest.

According to fire officials, the practice "presents an extreme fire hazard, impedes early rapid suppression of fires, and poses a life safety risk to firefighters and endangers the public health and safety of rural residents."

More than 200 residents and firefighters came before the Mendocino County Board of Supervisors on April 21, 2015, to request action on this industrial practice. In spite of overwhelming public support, the resolution failed by one vote.

More:

Hack-and-Squirt Opponents Hoping for 2016 Ballot Measure
Ukiahdailyjournal.com (July 29)

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5. Wildfire News

What It's Like to Plunge into the Heart of a Forest Fire
News.nationalgeographic.com (July 29)

Are Massive Wildfires the New Normal?
CBSNews.com (July 28)

Alaska's Wildfire Season of 2015 May Soon Be the State's Worst
AND.com (July 26)

High-Def Cameras Replacing Rangers in Towers As Eyes to Detect Wildfires
Oregonlive.com (July 26)

Planning Effort Considers Broad Effects of Catastrophic Wildfire
TAOS News.com (July 28)

Georgia: Prescribed Fire Good for All Concerned
Albanyherald.com (July 25)

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II. Federal Lands Management

1. The Way We Pay for Wildfires Could Be Making Them Worse

Washingtonpost.com (July 28) - The American West is burning up, and the sad fact about wildfires is the more the West burns, the less money the federal government has to pay for it.

In fact, the federal government hasn't had enough money to pay for fighting wildfires in at least a decade. And its patchwork method for paying for the fight could actually be causing more fires to happen.

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2. Forest Service Next Generation Air Tanker Takes to the Air

Redbluffdailynews.com (July 25) - The USDA Forest Service and the US Coast Guard are in the final stages of preparing for the Coast Guard to transfer a Next Generation Airtanker to the Forest Service. Tanker 118 was scheduled to begin flying wildfire suppression missions from Sacramento earlier this month.

The Forest Service began to use air tankers to drop fire retardant to reduce the intensity and spread of wildfires in the 1950s. For the past 35 years, the Forest Service has used air tankers contracted from private industry.

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3. Revisiting Timber Sales in the Shawnee National Forest

Thesouthern.com (July 24) - If thousands of trees surround an economically challenged area, wouldn't it make sense to harvest some of them to help local coffers?

It seems posing that question is akin to reopening wounds and debates from 25 years ago, when environmentalists banded together to protest logging in the Shawnee National Forest.

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4. 20,000 Comments Boil Down to Four Main Issues in Flathead Forest Plan Revision

Missoulian.com (July 27) - More than 20,000 public comments have boiled down to four main issues for revising the Flathead National Forest's management plan: vegetation management, fish and wildlife habitat, recreation and access, and recommended wilderness.

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5. Forest Service's Regional Forester Visits LBL, Talks Pisgah "Pause"

WKMS.org (July 28) - Tony Tooke, the United States Forest Service's southern region forester, stopped by Land Between the Lakes National Recreation Area earlier this week, where he said the Forest Service's controversial Pisgah Bay Project has been temporarily shelved-but not fully scrapped.

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III. International Forestry News

1. A Little-Known Big Producer: Will Forest Policy Reform in Peru Support Farm-Forestry?

Blog.cifor.org (July 27) - In Peru, a Center for International Forestry Research team has been wrangling with policymakers on how the new Law no. 29736 takes into account (or doesn't) enduring and sustainable family forestry systems.

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2. Japanese Forester Says Greater Use of Wood Needed to Help Protect Nation's Forests

Japantimes.co (July 28) - Toru Hayami, head of Mie Prefecture-based forest management company Hayami Forest, wants houses and offices in Japan to use more wood in the interest of forest conservation. Poor demand and low timber prices have caused Japan's forest products industry to flounder and allowed the country's forestland to degrade.

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3. Discovering Untapped Value in Europe's Forests

Phys.org (July 28) - Nonwood forest products can help boost the economies of remote mountainous areas of Europe, maintain local traditions, and preserve unique landscapes for generations to come.

Such are the findings from the EU-funded STARTREE project, which was discussed at the recent annual International Association for Landscape Ecology (IALE) World Congress. STARTREE partners from the University of Padova, Italy, told the congress that products such as forest fruits, mushrooms, nuts, and essential oils present an untapped opportunity for many rural communities.

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IV. Forest Products Industry

1. Developer Breaks Ground on All-Timber Office Building in Minneapolis

Startribune.com (July 27) - Developer Hines has broken ground in Minneapolis' North Loop on its all-timber office building-the first commercial property in the United States to use an engineered wood material for its interior and structure.

More:

Can Wooden Skyscrapers Revive the US Timber Industry?

IBTimes.com (July 24) - A turnaround in the forest products industry could be on the horizon. A growing number of architects and designers predict that, very soon, Americans will see a new breed of wooden high-rise buildings take shape that could shore up the struggling forest industry in states such as Washington. Though detractors see tall wooden buildings as idealistic and regressive-dangerous, even-major architectural firms and government agencies are widely touting them for their ability to generate jobs in rural areas and improve the sustainability of cities and towns.

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2. Collins Celebrates Milestone as Kane Hardwood Division Completes 20 Years of FSC Forest Management Certification

Power-eng.com (July 30) - Third-party certifier SCS Global Services has announced that the Collins Pennsylvania Forest managed by Kane Hardwood, a division of Collins, earned Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) Forest Management certification for another 5-year period, building upon 20 consecutive years of certification. The Collins Pennsylvania Forest, comprising 118,000 acres in the Allegheny Mountains of northern Pennsylvania, is one of the longest continuously certified forests under the FSC label.

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3. Forestry Developers Voice Displeasure during Offset Workshop

ICIS.com (July 28) - Forestry developers continued to point out numerous flaws in the recently updated forestry offset protocol, but officials with the cap-and-trade regulator, the California Air Resources Board, noted there is little they can do in the short term to change the regulations.

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4. Rayonier CEO Says REIT Benefits from Diversification of Timber Markets

REIT.com (July 27) - In 2014 Rayonier spun off its Performance Fibers manufacturing business to focus on its forest products and timber operations.

David Nunes, president and CEO of Rayonier Inc. described the split as a "natural progression" for the company. The REIT emerged as a "more pure timber play," Nunes said, owning 2.7 million acres in the United States and New Zealand.

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5. Canada: Kenora Forest Products Is Restarting This Fall; White River Forest Products Makes Improvements; Report Chides TimberWest

Kenora Forest Products Is Restarting This Fall

Northernontariobusiness.com (July 29) - The long-awaited restart of Kenora Forest Products received a cash injection courtesy from Ottawa. The mill had been closed since April 2008 when the crash of the US homebuilding market caused Prendiville to lay off 105 employees.

White River Forest Products Cashes Up to Make High-Tech Improvements

Northernontariobusiness.com (July 28) - White River Forest Products, located halfway between Sault Ste. Marie and Thunder Bay, Ontario, is undergoing a $20-million overhaul over the next two years with a high-efficiency production line arriving this summer.

Report Chides TimberWest over Old Trees in the Great Bear Rainforest

Theglobeandmail.com (July 27) - When the government of British Columbia agreed in 2006 to protect the Great Bear Rainforest, it won widespread praise and the Gift to the Earth Award from the World Wildlife Fund.

It sounded great, but when it hit the ground on Sonora Island, at the south end of the Great Bear Rainforest, residents began to wonder.

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V. Biomass

1. When Is a Tree "Waste" and Why It Matters for the Clean Power Plan

EENews.net (July 24) - When presenting the case for the use of wood energy under the Obama administration's proposed Clean Power Plan, the Biomass Power Association created a simple diagram to answer some complicated questions: When is a tree a tree and when is it "waste biomass"?

The questions pertain to a contentious issue in the debate whether burning wood at power plants is a renewable, carbon-neutral energy source, or harmful to the global climate. The issue may also have a bit to do with combating wildfires in the drought-parched West.

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2. Greenleaf Acquires Plainfield Renewable Energy Facility in Connecticut

Energy-business-review.com (July 28) - Greenleaf Power has acquired the 37.5MW Plainfield Renewable Energy plant in Connecticut from Leidos. Operational since 2013, the Plainfield Renewable Energy uses clean biomass to generate enough electricity to power 280,000 homes.

The acquisition marks Greenleaf's sixth purchase in North America and increases its total renewable biomass capacity to more than 180MW.

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3. Industry Checkoff Program Development Discussed at PFI Conference

Biomass Magazine.com (July 24) - An update of the proposed wood-to-energy (WTE) checkoff program was provided at the 2015 Pellet Fuels Institute conference in Williamsburg, Virginia. The concept is under review by industry, and a draft is expected late this year or early 2016.

The WTE checkoff program is administered through the USDA as a way to raise funds for research and promotion of the industry to grow the markets.

Some of the issues mentioned as potential areas of focus include, greenhouse gas and carbon accounting for wood as a source of energy, forest health and sustainability, value of wood for heat, as well as economic and employment impacts in the industry.

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4. Watching Wood Dry

Biomass Magazine.com (July 26) - Adequately drying wood chip fuel is an important component of maximizing heat and power production, and techniques vary widely.

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5. New Holland, SUNY Partner on Biomass Research

Biomass Magazine.com (July 24) - Following the US Department of Energy's announcement to award the State University of New York up to $3.5 million to fund a research project that seeks to develop ways to reduce the cost of delivering biomass for refinement, New Holland Agriculture announced plans to assist SUNY researchers in the endeavor.

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VI. Urban Forestry

1. What We've Lost: The Community Impact of Invasive Species

Midmichigan.secondwavemedia.com (July 28) - Simmons Street in northeast Grand Rapids was once tree-lined and beautiful. The maturing trees were just reaching the size at which their benefits-shade, character, increased property values, and more-were being realized when they were all cut down, leaving entire blocks naked.

The ash trees, in the prime of their lives, were affected by an invasive species-the emerald ash borer.

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2. Utility Says It Cut Hundreds of Trees to Protect Power for Thousands of People

Washington Post.com (July 27) - A contingent of residents in Potomac, Maryland, plans to appeal to Maryland's Public Service Commission in September, hoping to persuade the regulatory board to force the electric utility Pepco to moderate tree-trimming and -cutting practices that have resulted in the loss of hundreds of trees since last summer.

Pepco says it is simply following mandates from the commission to improve service reliability for its 800,000 Maryland and District of Columbia customers after years of frequent and protracted outages.

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3. The Giving Trees

Bakersfield.com (July 25) - Last year, the Tree Foundation of Kern County, California, in partnership with IKEA, planted 63 drought-tolerant, native trees in Bakersfield's Panorama Park.

These types of projects not only beautify the parks but add future shade, homes for local habitat, erosion control, and air pollution mitigation.

Unfortunately, the ongoing drought is seriously threatening the foundation's efforts.

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VII. Plants and Pests

1. Invasive Beetle Costs Pittsburgh-Area Power Companies Plenty

Triblive.com (July 28) - The emerald ash borer, a pest the size of a grain of rice, is causing big problems for utilities.

Of the $31 million West Penn Power will spend on vegetation management this year along 4,500 miles of lines, about $1.5 million is dedicated to ash tree removal.

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2. Emerald Ash Borer Would Hurt Mississippi Forestry Economy

Vicksburgpost.com (July 26) - The emerald ash borer has been identified in 25 states, devastating production of ash and some related trees. Mississippi is virtually surrounded with infected forest, and it seems less a matter of if than when the most destructive forest pest ever seen on this continent invades the state.

With an all but impending infestation, foresters are facing the dilemma of treating trees with pesticides in advance, harvesting immature ash to sell the timber on a flooded market, or just waiting in hope of a full harvest.

Note: SAF member John Willis quoted.

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3. Pennsylvania: Berks County Prepares for Gypsy Moth Invasion

Berksmontnews.com (July 27) - Like their namesakes, gypsy moths have taken to journeying across the country, starting in Massachusetts and spreading as far west as Wisconsin and as far south as Virginia's border with North Carolina.

As the invasive species spreads, so does concern about defoliation in its wake.

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VIII. Science and Research

1. Fire Surprise: Insect-Killed Forests No More Likely to Burn

KTVZ.com (July 25) - An analysis of wildfire extent in Oregon and Washington over the past 30 years shows very little difference in the likelihood of fires in forests with and without insect damage.

Indeed, other factors-drought, storms, and fuel accumulation from years of fire suppression-may be more important than insects in determining if fire is more or less likely from year to year.

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2. Tree Rings and Plant Surveys: Scientists Map Intensity of Northwest Territory's Forest Fires

CBC.ca (July 26) - Canadian Forest Service employee Dan Thompson has been tramping through burned out forest throughout the Northwest Territories this summer, looking for clues into the ecological impact of the fires that burned nearly 34,000 square kilometers a year ago.

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3. For Loblolly Pines, A Fertilization and Water Scarcity Paradox

US Forest Service (July 28) - As in natural forests, the growth of loblolly pines in plantations is limited by essential resources: sunlight, nutrients, and water. Fertilization-an increasingly common practice for adding nutrients to boost wood production-allows trees to shift their growth away from roots to leaves and stems. Since a tree is dependent on its roots to provide water, how does a fertilized tree respond when water supplies are limited in times of drought? Does increased productivity intensify water stress?

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IX. Items of Interest

1. Biologists, Officials Are Rattled over Ohio Snakes

Dispatch.com (July 26) - Two southern Ohio biologists are trying to help timber rattlesnakes by studying their habitat and behavior, but they say state forestry officials are pushing for changes that could hamper their work and put the reptiles in even more peril.

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2. Retired Foresters' Book Discusses Role of Ponderosa Pine in the West

Ravallirepublic.com (July 25) - Retired forest ecology research scientists Steve Arno and Carl Fiedler have authored the recently released Ponderosa: People, Fire, and the West's Most Iconic Tree, which chronicles the history, ecology, and allure of the original ponderosa pine forest in the western reaches of North America.

The book also profiles the century-long transformation of the modern forest and the missteps humans have made along the way that have placed the beloved species in a space where it is vulnerable to insects and wildfire.

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3. Dovetail Issues Report on the Role of Cooperatives in Forestry

DovetailInc.org (July 13) - Cooperatives as an enterprise structure offer opportunities to the forestry community. As voluntary, democratically run businesses, agricultural Cooperatives alone returned $4 billion to their owner-members in 2012. Across the United States there are 100 million people who belong to 47,000 Cooperatives. The role of US Forestry Cooperatives surged in the 1990s and early 2000s, but waned with the recent recession. Lessons learned from that wave, from the ongoing success of international Forestry Cooperatives, and from other cooperative ventures illustrate the potential role of cooperatives in forestry.

To download the report, visit the Dovetail website.

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X. SAF News

1. SAF Media Moments

Weaver Named Maryland Department of Natural Resources "Forester of the Year"

The Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR) Forest Service has named Jamie Weaver, special rivers watershed forester and SAF member, its Forester of the Year.

Op-Eds by SAF Members

The Unsung Heroes in Our Wildfire Fight
The Hill.com (July 28) By Jay Jensen

"Our battle with wildfire is about people. Our federal land wildfire challenges are mostly distant from population centers, and it is hard to understand what is at risk when a wildfire has not directly affected many urban residents. Success in reducing the amount of catastrophic wildfires will come when people are more directly involved in our fire solution."

Our Forests Are in Crisis
Napavalleyregister.com (July 28) By Dave Bischel

"The drought continues to hold a tight grip on the state [of California], and summer will only bring more heat and dry conditions. Combined with the more than 75 percent increase in annual wildfires and the prospect of yet another potentially severe and lengthy wildfire season, one thing is clear: we must take swift action to save our forests."

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2. Earn CFEs for Your Reviews

Reviewers for the Journal of Forestry and Forest Science may now apply for continuing forestry education (CFE) credit for their completed reviews.* Reviewers may request two (2) Category 3 CFEs for each completed review.

To request your CFE credits, please complete the Continuing Forestry Education Post Approval Form for Category 3 credit using the Publications section on page 2 of the form. Submit your completed form along with the thank you e-mail you receive from the journal acknowledging your review as evidence of completion.

*Effective April 14, 2015.

Questions or comments? Contact cf@safnet.org.

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3. Apply Now for SAF Diversity Scholarships

SAF Diversity Scholarships

Apply now to be part of the SAF Diversity Ambassador Program and participate in the 2015 SAF National Convention in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Ambassadors will receive leadership and networking training, interact with SAF leaders, meet the Chief of the US Forest Service and other professionals, and learn how to participate as a future leader in SAF.

The deadline for applications is Friday, September 4, 2015.

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4. 2015 SAF National Convention News

The 2015 SAF National Convention-Recreating Forestry-"The Confluence of Science, Society, and Technology"-will highlight a variety of contemporary forest resource management issues, including the trends, influences, and technologies that are facilitating the profession's progress toward the future. View the program here.

The meeting will take place in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, where attendees will enjoy fabulous hospitality, the charm of Louisiana's capital city on the banks of the mighty Mississippi, and world-renowned cuisine alongside a scientific and technical program that provides an intrinsic opportunity for exploring the many links between the social, economic, and ecological considerations that form modern forest stewardship. Visit the SAF Convention website for full event details.

Abstract submission is now closed for presentations in the scientific and technical concurrent sessions, but we are still accepting submissions for the poster symposium. Submit your poster here.

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5.SAF Store Sale Item of the Week: SAF Cap

Keep the sun off your head and out of your eyes with this unstructured, two-tone cap. Order yours for just $14.95 from the SAF Store.

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About The E-Forester:

A Benefit of SAF Membership:
The E-Forester is sent to SAF members in good standing each week.

Disclaimer:
The Society of American Foresters does not necessarily endorse the views expressed in the news items and/or links to additional information that appear in The E-Forester.

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