Home > Publications > Forest Science
Forest Science

Aims and Scope
Editorial Board
Audience
Abstracting/Indexing
Special Issues

Guide for Authors
Online Submission

Subscription Info

Impact Factor
Most Downloaded Articles

Advertising Info
Reprints and Permissions


ISSN 0015-749X

Editor:
W. Keith Moser


 

 

Guide for Authors

EDITORIAL POLICY
OPEN ACCESS
SUBMISSION GUIDELINES
STYLE AND FORM
SUPPLEMENTAL MATERIALS
RIGHTS AND PERMISSIONS


EDITORIAL POLICY

Forest Science seeks manuscripts that either report fundamental and significant research in subjects related to forestry broadly defined, or report investigations into the application of Forest Science in management and practice in any of the forested ecosystems of the world. Manuscripts submitted to Forest Science must not have been previously published and must not be under consideration for publication elsewhere. At the time of submission, authors must provide information describing the extent to which data or text in the manuscript have been used in other papers or books that are published, in press, submitted, or soon to be submitted elsewhere. Authors who wish to use material such as figures or tables from previous publications are responsible for obtaining permission to do so from the previous publisher(s). All manuscripts submitted to Forest Science undergo peer review. Manuscripts revised and returned to Forest Science more than 6 months after review will be treated as new manuscripts. The Society of American Foresters holds copyright to Forest Science, and authors will be asked to assign their rights before their contributions are published. A form will be provided for this purpose. Authors whose work is not subject to copyright, e.g., federal government employees, should so state when they submit their manuscripts.

Editorial correspondence should be addressed to W. Keith Moser, Editor-in-Chief, Forest Science, moserk@safnet.org. Direct all correspondence pertaining to manuscript submission and status to Matthew Walls, Managing Editor, Forest Science, 5400 Grosvenor Lane, Bethesda, MD 20814-2198; (866) 897-8720, ext. 130; fax (301) 897-3690; wallsm@safnet.org.


OPEN ACCESS

The Society of American Foresters (SAF) is committed to advancing the science, education, technology, and practice of forestry. In support of this mission, all journals published by SAF allow authors to post the accepted, pre-print version of their manuscript on the author's personal website or deposit the article into any institutional repository maintained by the author's employer. This is often referred to as "Green Open Access".

The pre-print version of the manuscript is the author-created, peer-reviewed, accepted manuscript. We ask that authors link to the published version via the article DOI wherever possible.

For a complete list of all rights retained by authors published within the Forest Science, see Rights & Permissions.

Gold Open Access
For those authors wishing to make available the published, typeset version of their article, SAF offers a "Gold Open Access" option. Gold Open Access articles can be viewed by anyone with an internet connection anywhere in the world without the need for a current subscription.

Gold Open Access articles undergo the same rigorous peer review as those published under the traditional subscription-access model; however, since the peer review and publishing services costs cannot be recovered from subscription revenue for Open Access content, authors wishing to have their articles published under this option are charged an Article Processing Charge. Article Processing Charges are separate from and additional to any other publication charges, such as color figure charges or reprints. Our Article Processing Charge is $2800 USD.

Unlike articles published under the traditional model, authors choosing the Gold Open Access option are not required to transfer copyright to the Society of American Foresters. Instead, articles are published under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial (CC-BY-NC) license. This license permits users to use, reproduce, adapt, disseminate, or display the article provided that the author is attributed as the original creator and that the reuse is restricted to non-commercial purposes, i.e. research or educational use.

Gold Open Access articles can be shared, copied, adapted, or redistributed in any medium or format, including the final published, typeset version, and may be uploaded to any personal, institutional, or public repository subject to acknowledgement of the author and journal. We ask that authors link to the published version via the article DOI wherever possible. Gold Open Access articles will appear in both the electronic and print editions of the journal; the electronic edition will be tagged with an OA icon to note its availability.

Authors will be offered the choice of Open Access publication after their article is accepted. Payment of the Article Processing Charge will be required before publication of the article.


SUBMISSION GUIDELINES

Manuscripts must be submitted in final form. Inadequately prepared manuscripts may be returned without review. The author is responsible for accuracy of data, names, quotations, citations, and statistical analyses. Strict economy of words, tables, formulas, and figures should be observed, and specialized jargon avoided. Recommended style manuals are: The Chicago Manual of Style, 14th or 15th ed. (University of Chicago Press) and Scientific Style and Formats: The CBE Manual for Authors, Editors, and Publishers (Cambridge University Press). See the latter for abbreviations and symbols. Metric units are required. See "Style and Form" below for more detailed information on manuscript preparation.

Manuscripts submitted to Forest Science are not assessed page charges. There is, however, a publication charge for figures and other illustrative material that authors wish to be produced in color. The charge is based on actual printing costs and will be determined prior to publication.

Fundamental Research
Fundamental Research articles should present novel research and analysis that significantly advances knowledge in the broad field of forestry. Manuscripts about forests or the impacts of activities on forests are welcome. Submissions are judged on their original contributions, the importance of their subject matter, and their clarity, accuracy, and conciseness. Fundamental Research articles may be of any length but are usually less than 17 printed pages (approximately 17,000 words); the length should be in proportion to the importance and consequence of the ideas or concepts contained in the manuscript. Manuscripts must be double-spaced throughout (including tables, illustration captions, and literature citations) with ample margins. Line numbering and page numbering must be employed. Author names, affiliations, and acknowledgements should not appear anywhere in the electronic version of the text; this information must be entered separately into the online submission form where requested to preserve author anonymity during the peer review. The title should be concise, specific, descriptive, and no longer than 15 words. Series titles are acceptable only when all preceding papers have been published in Forest Science; acceptance of a first paper in a series is not a commitment to accept the remainder. The abstract should be concise, 2-3% of the length of the text but not more than 200 words. Up to 5 keywords should be provided; these should be unique from those appearing in the title to allow for more robust indexing of the final published article. Footnotes should be gathered at the end of the article as endnotes; designate endnotes in the text by numbers within brackets (e.g., [1]). Authors should use an American dictionary as the standard for spelling; many word processing programs allow selection of American or US preferences in their spell checkers, which can automate selection of the appropriate spelling. Submit your manuscript online at http://www.rapidreview.com/SAF/author.html. Because the review process is double-blind, please ensure that authors are not identified anywhere in the manuscript (including running heads and feet).

Applied Research
Applied Research articles focus on research, practice, and techniques addressing the goods, services, and problems of forests and forestry. Applied research articles represent the logical next step to the fundamental articles defined above, where the researcher focuses on the process of implementing scientific knowledge on specific situations and with specific goals in mind. The experimentation and implications of such research may be more limited in scope geographically, but that is not a requirement. What is a requirement is that an applied research article be potentially useful to forest managers and other forestry professionals on a practical level. Manuscripts should be limited to eight journal pages, or less than 4,500 words (excluding tables, figures, and Literature Cited). Submissions must be double-spaced throughout (including tables, illustration captions, and literature citations) with ample margins. Line numbering and page numbering must be employed. Author names, affiliations, and acknowledgements should not appear anywhere in the electronic version of the text; this information must be entered separately into the online submission form where requested to preserve author anonymity during the peer review. The title should be concise, specific, descriptive, and no longer than 15 words. Series titles are acceptable only when all preceding papers have been published in Forest Science; acceptance of a first paper in a series is not a commitment to accept the remainder. The abstract should be concise, 2-3% of the length of the text but not more than 200 words. Up to 5 keywords should be provided; these should be unique from those appearing in the title to allow for more robust indexing of the final published article. Footnotes should be gathered at the end of the article as endnotes; designate endnotes in the text by numbers within brackets (e.g., [1]). Authors should use an American dictionary as the standard for spelling; many word processing programs allow selection of American or US preferences in their spell checkers, which can automate selection of the appropriate spelling. Submit your manuscript online at http://www.rapidreview.com/SAF/author.html. Because the review process is double-blind, please ensure that authors are not identified anywhere in the manuscript (including running heads and feet).

Review Articles
Review Articles provide syntheses of the current knowledge in broad topical areas of current importance. They highlight important references that shaped the development of the topic, including relevant literature outside of forestry, and address gaps in the literature, controversial questions, and research priorities. They may advance hypotheses. Review Articles should consider diverging paths of thought within a topic without necessarily pronouncing judgment. Review Articles may be of any length but are usually less than 17 printed pages (approximately 17,000 words). Manuscripts must be double-spaced throughout (including tables, illustration captions, and literature citations) with ample margins. Line numbering and page numbering must be employed. Author names, affiliations, and acknowledgements should not appear anywhere in the electronic version of the text; this information must be entered separately into the online submission form where requested to preserve author anonymity during the peer review. The title should be concise, specific, descriptive, and no longer than 15 words. Series titles are acceptable only when all preceding papers have been published in Forest Science; acceptance of a first paper in a series is not a commitment to accept the remainder. The abstract should be concise, 2-3% of the length of the text but not more than 200 words. Up to 5 keywords should be provided; these should be unique from those appearing in the title to allow for more robust indexing of the final published article. Footnotes should be gathered at the end of the article as endnotes; designate endnotes in the text by numbers within brackets (e.g., [1]). Authors should use an American dictionary as the standard for spelling; many word processing programs allow selection of American or US preferences in their spell checkers, which can automate selection of the appropriate spelling. Submit your manuscript online at http://www.rapidreview.com/SAF/author.html. Because the review process is double-blind, please ensure that authors are not identified anywhere in the manuscript (including running heads and feet).

Brief Communications
Brief Communications are intended to provide rapid dissemination of a timely and significant study. They may report preliminary or novel results on limited data sets or applications of existing methodologies to new areas. Brief Communications can also serve as a forum for comments or replies to articles recently published in Forest Science. Approval by the editor-in-chief should be sought before submitting a manuscript. Should a comment be accepted for consideration, a reply to that comment by the original author may be solicited. Every effort will be made to publish both the comment and the reply in the same issue. By their very nature, Brief Communications should be less than 2,000 words and should contain no more than 3-4 figures or tables. Submit your manuscript online at http://www.rapidreview.com/SAF/author.html. Because the review process is double-blind, please ensure that authors are not identified anywhere in the manuscript (including running heads and feet).

Book Reviews
Book reviews may be solicited or submitted without invitation. Forest Science reviews recently published books and monographs that report results of forestry research or are otherwise of interest to scientists who investigate the biological, physical, or social attributes of the forest. Book reviews may be e-mailed to W. Keith Moser, Book Review Editor, at moserk@safnet.org, or mailed to Book Review Editor, Forest Science, 5400 Grosvenor Lane, Bethesda, MD 20814-2198.


STYLE AND FORM

Nomenclature and Terminology
At first mention of a species in the text, give its common name, if any, immediately followed in parentheses by its italicized scientific name and authority. Some deviation from this rule may be desirable to avoid awkwardness when names are numerous. The authority for nomenclature of North American tree species is The Checklist of United States Trees (Native and Naturalized) by E.L. Little Jr. (Agriculture Handbook 541, USDA 1979). Authorities of nomenclature of other plants and of animals are listed in Scientific Style and Formats: The CBE Manual for Authors, Editors, and Publishers (Cambridge University Press). Where applicable, indicate how or by whom taxa were identified, and location of voucher specimens. Technical usage in forestry and allied fields follows The Dictionary of Forestry (SAF 1998; available online at http://www.dictionaryofforestry.org.

Mathematical Material
See Scientific Style and Formats: The CBE Manual for Authors, Editors, and Publishers (Cambridge University Press) for methods of presenting mathematical material in the simplest form to ensure accuracy and prompt publication of paper.

Literature Cited
Literature citations are to provide the reader with enough information to find a document from the appropriate source. This information should be stated in a clear and concise manner. Theses and unpublished papers may be included sparingly. Only those appearing in the text should appear in the citation list at the end of the article. Personal communications should be cited in the text and should include the affiliation of the person and the date of the communication: (John Helms, pers. comm., University of California-Berkeley, August 10, 2006).

List all references alphabetically at the end of the paper and cite them parenthetically in the text by the author-date system, e.g. (Smith 2006). Directly quoted material must include the page number, e.g., (Smith 2006, p. 17). If a citation includes three or more authors, use "et al." where cited in the text, e.g., (Smith et al. 2006), but list authors accordingly with the citation: for citations with ten authors or fewer, all should be listed; for citations with eleven or more, only the first seven should be listed, followed by "et al." Where possible, limit the number of citations to three per set of parentheses. Arrange references cited together within parentheses chronologically. Publications by the same author(s) in the same year should be listed as 2006a, 2006b, etc.

Examples of Literature Cited style:

Book
Houghton, J.T., G.J. Jenkins, and J.J. Ephraums. 1990. Climate change: The IPCC scientific assessment. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom. 365 p.

Chapter in book
Brokaw, N.V.L. 1982. Treefalls: Frequency timing and consequences. P. 101-108 in The ecology of a tropical forest: Seasonal rhythms and long term changes, Leigh, E.G., Jr., A.S. Rand, and D.M. Windsor (eds.). Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, DC.

Article in journal
Jurgensen, M.F., J. Johnson, M.A. Wise, C.S. Williams, and R. Wilson. 1997. Impacts of timber harvesting on soil organic matter, nitrogen, productivity, and health of Inland Northwest forests. For. Sci. 43(2):234-251.

Proceedings
Blake, J.I., G.L. Somers, and G.A. Ruark. 1990. Perspectives on process modeling of forest growth responses to environmental stress. P. 9-20 in Proc. of conf. on Process modeling of forest growth responses to environmental stress, Dixon, R.K. (ed.). Timber Press, Portland, OR.

Technical report
Mason, R.R., and H.G. Paul. 1994. Monitoring larval populations of the Douglas-fir tussock moth and western spruce budworm on permanent plots: Sampling methods and statistical properties of data. USDA For. Serv. Gen. Tech. Rep. PNW-GTR-333. 22 p.

Thesis/dissertation
Korol, R.L. 1985. The soil and water regime of uneven-age interior Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca). M.Sc. thesis, Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C., Canada. 164 p.

Web publications
USDA Forest Service. 2002. The process predicament: How statutory, regulatory, and administrative factors affect national forest management. Available online at www.fs.fed.us/publications.html; last accessed Apr. 15, 2005.

Tables and Figures
The critical test for a table or figure is that it is the best way to communicate the information that it contains. Captions and titles for tables and figures should have enough detail so the table or figure will stand alone. Tables should not duplicate data presented in figures. Details about preparing tables and figures can be found in Scientific Style and Formats: The CBE Manual for Authors, Editors, and Publishers (Cambridge University Press) and in The Chicago Manual of Style, 14th or 15th ed. (University of Chicago Press). Suggestions for preparing clear tables and figures are presented in "What I Meant to Say Was..." Tips and Resources for Improving Your Professional Communication Skills (The Irland Group, RFD #2, Box 9200, Winthrop, Maine 04364).

All tables and figures must be cited in numerical order in the text. Place each table and figure on a separate page with its title at top. Place table titles and figure captions together at the end of the manuscript. Figures must be submitted as separate high-resolution EPS, TIFF, or JPG files. Do not embed figures within the manuscript file.

Tables should be double-spaced; however, exceedingly large tables may be single-spaced to reduce the number of pages they cover. Tables should be sized to fit on a single 8.5 by 11 page in portrait orientation NOT landscape. Total table width should be no more than 7 in.; total table height should be no more than 9.66 in. including the table title and table footnote(s). Table titles, column heads, and side heads should be in initial cap and lowercase, not all caps. Single-weight horizontal lines should go across the top of the table body, below the column headings, and below the table. Vertical lines should not be used to separate columns. Units should appear under the column heading, but above the line separating the headings from the body of the table, except when two or more consecutive columns have the same units; then the unit is under the line separating the headings and the body, in parentheses, centered over the applicable column, and preceded and followed by ellipses extending over applicable columns. Table footnotes may be designated with numbers or letters or symbols; choose the one that is least confusing with other entries in the table (e.g., exponents, letters indicating significantly different means, and asterisks indicating significance) and be consistent among the tables. The sequence for symbols in table footnotes is asterisk, dagger, double dagger, section mark, parallel lines, number symbol. Use abbreviations consistent with SAF style. Common abbreviations are yr (year and years), dbh (not DBH), ha, ht, vol, m3, cm, g.

Figures may be maps, diagrams, or summaries of results, such as bar charts and line graphs. The line weight for rules should be at least 1 point (no hairline rules). Captions appear at the bottom of the figure in the journal, but are listed on a separate page at the end of the manuscript. Captions should not appear on the figure itself. Use abbreviations consistent with SAF style. Common abbreviations are yr (year and years), dbh (not DBH), ha, ht, vol, m3, cm, g. Labels for figures should be in initial cap and lowercase, not all caps. Avoid fake 3-D and other effects that add to the complexity of the figure, but not to its ability to communicate. Use fill patterns or shadings with sufficient contrast so that they are distinguishable when reproduced in black and white, but avoid the use of gray backgrounds in graphs and charts. Color figures can be printed if absolutely necessary to convey the information. Consult with the journal editor to determine the need for color. There is, however, a publication charge for figures and other illustrative material that authors wish to be produced in color. The charge is based on actual printing costs and will be determined prior to publication. Contact the editor for permission to print in color prior to submitting your manuscript for review.


SUPPLEMENTAL MATERIALS

Forest Science permits authors to upload supplementary data for online storage and distribution with their accepted manuscripts. By definition, supplementary materials are not essential to the manuscript but are specifically relevant to their article and may help readers better understand their work, particularly if available in a format (e.g., data sets, video or audio files, maps, other images, detailed calculations or equation derivations, examples, source code or programs, statistical analysis code) not conducive for a printed outlet.

Supplementary data should be uploaded in Rapid Review at the time of submission, or early in the review process if specifically requested by an associate editor or reviewer and agreed to by the authors. To avoid any possible errors in presentation, supplemental material(s) are not edited or peer-reviewed, and hence should be provided in final form when submitted. It is therefore the authors' sole responsibility to ensure that supplemental materials are accurate. Authors must certify that there are no copyright issues with any supplemental materials, and avoid including any previously published materials without appropriate permissions. Supplemental documents should stand-alone and be fully referenced as appropriate, but avoid using internet links or references. Reference to each piece of supplemental material should be made in proper context in the text of the article, with an "S" placed in front of each reference (e.g., Table S1, Figure S2, Video Clip S3).

A list of supplementary materials should be provided by the authors at the end of their manuscript (following the Literature Cited section) with a descriptive, one-line caption included for each unique supplement. The following example demonstrates this formatting:

SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIALS
Supplement 1. Video clip of modified skyline logging system using new rigging structure in steep terrain.

Supplement 2. FORTRAN code of program developed to simulate different stress loads of modified skyline logging system under different wind conditions, soil conditions, and types of timber.

Supplement 3. R program written to conduct nonlinear ordinary least squares regression on modified skyline logging productivity function.

Supplement 4. ASCII text file of an example data set required by the R program in Supplement 3.

Supplement 5. PDF of survey mailed to skyline logging operations in the Pacific Northwest used to identify the most popular current systems in use.

All files uploaded as supplements should have their preferred version of the commercial software listed, and if possible be presented in formats that can be read in free, publicly available programs (e.g., PDF or ASCII files for text documents rather than those in a native (proprietary) word processor or spreadsheet format). There is a 10 MB limit to supplemental files that can be uploaded. Supplementary data should not contain certain types of files, such as executable files (e.g., *.exe, *.com) or those script or macro files (e.g., *.vbs) or compressed files (e.g., *.zip) that are vulnerable to malware. Inappropriate materials should not be included.


RIGHTS AND PERMISSIONS

The Society of American Foresters holds copyright to Forest Science, and authors will be asked to assign their rights before their contributions are published. A form will be provided for this purpose. Authors whose work is not subject to copyright, e.g., federal government employees, should so state when they submit their manuscripts.

Authors of articles published within Forest Science retain the following rights:

  • the right to use the journal article, in full or in part, for their own personal use, including classroom teaching;
  • the right to use the journal article, in full or in part, in preparation of derivative works, extension of the article into book-length, or other works, provide that it is accompanied by a full acknowledgement of the original publication;
  • the right to include the journal article, in full or in part, in a thesis or dissertation, provided it is not published commercially;
  • the right to post a pre-print version of the journal article, revised if desired to reflect any changes made in the peer review process, on the author's personal web site or within any institutional repository maintained by the authors' employer, provided it include the complete citation and a link to the printed version on the Forest Science web site; the web site or repository must not charge a fee for document delivery or article access;
  • the right to of the author's employer to use the material in any intra-company use; reproduction for commercial redistribution would require permission from SAF;
  • patent, trademark, or other rights related to processes described within the article.

To request permission to make multiple or systematic reproductions or to republish material (including figure and article excerpts) in any manner not outlined above, contact:

    Customer Service Department
    Copyright Clearance Center, Inc.
    222 Rosewood Drive
    Danvers, MA 01923
    (978) 750-8400
    Fax: (978) 750-4470
    www.copyright.com


Online Content
Your online subscription to this journal entitles you access to the current issue and full online archive.

Current Issue and Online Archive

First time users? Sign up here

If you do not have a subscription, you may purchase pay-per-view access with your credit card.

Free Journal Content
Tables of Contents and Abstracts
Sample Issue