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ISSN: 0022-1201

Editor:
Don C. Bragg


 

Guide for Authors

EDITORIAL POLICY
OPEN ACCESS
SUBMISSION GUIDELINES
SUPPLEMENTAL GUIDELINES FOR SUBMISSIONS ON INTERNATIONAL FORESTS/FORESTRY
STYLE AND FORM
SUPPLEMENTAL MATERIALS
RIGHTS AND PERMISSIONS


EDITORIAL POLICY

The Journal of Forestry welcomes scientific and editorial manuscripts that advance the profession of forestry by presenting significant developments and ideas of general interest to forest management professionals. Submissions are welcome on any of the many facets of forestry, including economics, education and communication, entomology and pathology, fire, forest ecology, geospatial technologies, history, international forestry, measurements, policy, recreation, silviculture, social sciences, soils and hydrology, urban and community forestry, utilization and engineering, and wildlife management. Articles published in the Journal present, in a readable style, new and state-of-the-art knowledge, research, practices, ideas, and policies. Articles should be written as to be readable to a nonspecialist of the field being discussed, and topics of limited geographic or research scope should include a discussion of its implications beyond the initial area of research. Mini-series on topics of special interest are also published at the discretion of the editorial board. Manuscripts must not have been published previously and must not be under consideration for publication elsewhere.

The Journal of Forestry is unique among forest science journals in that it is a membership benefit for the 14,000+ members of the Society of American Foresters. As a result, authors in the Journal of Forestry have the opportunity to educate and inform practitioners, researchers, policy specialists, and other professionals who benefit from the advancement of scientific knowledge in our profession. Accordingly, contributors are strongly encouraged to include a section addressing the management and/or policy implications of their research.

Acceptance for publication is based on both editorial criteria and peer review. Manuscripts are evaluated for methodology, technical accuracy, breadth of appeal, clarity, contribution, and merit. The Journal reserves the right to publish countering or supplemental articles to promote discussion.

The Society of American Foresters holds copyright to the Journal of Forestry, and authors will be asked to assign their rights before their contributions are published. A form will be provided for this purpose. Authors whose work is not subject to copyright, e.g., federal government employees, should so state when they submit their manuscripts.

Contact Matthew Walls, Managing Editor, if you have any questions or need further guidance. Journal of Forestry, 5400 Grosvenor Lane, Bethesda, MD 20814-2198; (866) 897-8720, ext. 130; fax (301) 897-3690; wallsm@safnet.org.


OPEN ACCESS

The Society of American Foresters (SAF) is committed to advancing the science, education, technology, and practice of forestry. In support of this mission, all journals published by SAF allow authors to post the accepted, pre-print version of their manuscript on the author's personal website or deposit the article into any institutional repository maintained by the author's employer. This is often referred to as "Green Open Access".

The pre-print version of the manuscript is the author-created, peer-reviewed, accepted manuscript. We ask that authors link to the published version via the article DOI wherever possible.

For a complete list of all rights retained by authors published within the Journal of Forestry, see Rights & Permissions.

Gold Open Access
For those authors wishing to make available the published, typeset version of their article, SAF offers a "Gold Open Access" option. Gold Open Access articles can be viewed by anyone with an internet connection anywhere in the world without the need for a current subscription.

Gold Open Access articles undergo the same rigorous peer review as those published under the traditional subscription-access model; however, since the peer review and publishing services costs cannot be recovered from subscription revenue for Open Access content, authors wishing to have their articles published under this option are charged an Article Processing Charge. Article Processing Charges are separate from and additional to any other publication charges, such as color figure charges or reprints. Our Article Processing Charge is $2800 USD.

Unlike articles published under the traditional model, authors choosing the Gold Open Access option are not required to transfer copyright to the Society of American Foresters. Instead, articles are published under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial (CC-BY-NC) license. This license permits users to use, reproduce, adapt, disseminate, or display the article provided that the author is attributed as the original creator and that the reuse is restricted to non-commercial purposes, i.e. research or educational use.

Gold Open Access articles can be shared, copied, adapted, or redistributed in any medium or format, including the final published, typeset version, and may be uploaded to any personal, institutional, or public repository subject to acknowledgement of the author and journal. We ask that authors link to the published version via the article DOI wherever possible. Gold Open Access articles will appear in both the electronic and print editions of the journal; the electronic edition will be tagged with an OA icon to note its availability.

Authors will be offered the choice of Open Access publication after their article is accepted. Payment of the Article Processing Charge will be required before publication of the article.


SUBMISSION GUIDELINES

Each issue of the Journal of Forestry includes editorial features on timely topics in forestry as well as scientific articles offering more in-depth study and analysis. All scientific articles are peer-reviewed.

Editorial Features
Commentaries—These short opinion pieces are not formally reviewed but are evaluated for content and style by the editors and/or editorial board; commentaries may be sent to outside reviewers depending on available expertise. Maximum length is 1,000 words. The contributor of a "Commentary" must be a member of the Society of American Foresters. Submit the manuscript, complete contact information, and a head-and-shoulders photograph online at http://www.rapidreview.com/SAF/author.html.

Letters—Letters should directly address ideas or facts presented in the Journal. Priority is given to letters no longer than 250 words that refer to material published within the past six months. Letters may be e-mailed to journal@safnet.org, faxed to (301) 897-3690, attention Editor, or mailed to Editor, Journal of Forestry, 5400 Grosvenor Lane, Bethesda, MD 20814-2198.

Discussions—Longer opinion pieces will be considered for publication as "Discussion" articles. "Discussions" are evaluated for content and style by the editors and/or editorial board, but may be sent for outside review depending on available expertise. Maximum length is 4,500 words. Upon acceptance of a "Discussion", the evaluating editor will solicit two "Responses" (800-1,000 words each) from appropriate parties to the topic of the "Discussion" to accompany the final printed piece. Submit the manuscript, complete contact information, and a head-and-shoulders photograph online at http://www.rapidreview.com/SAF/author.html.

Exploring the Roots—These short introductions revisit seminal articles previously published by SAF and discuss topics of historical import to the field of forestry, as well as explore the historical basis for issues currently affecting forestry. Maximum length is 1,000 words. Proposals for "Exploring the Roots" columns may be e-mailed to journal@safnet.org, faxed to (301) 897-3690, attention Editor, or mailed to Editor, Journal of Forestry, 5400 Grosvenor Lane, Bethesda, MD 20814-2198.

New Releases—"Forestry Reports" are compiled by Carol Ayer (cayer@fs.fed.us), US Forest Service, National Forest Service Library. Book reviews may be e-mailed to W. Keith Moser, Book Review Editor, at moserk@safnet.org, faxed to (301) 897-3690, attention Book Review Editor, or mailed to Book Review Editor, Journal of Forestry, 5400 Grosvenor Lane, Bethesda, MD 20814-2198.

Picture the Past—"Picture the Past" submissions are intended to help preserve and share the visual legacy related to historic images of forests, forestry, lumbering, or the processing of forest products. Picture the Past contributions can be a single iconic picture, several related images, or even a brief photo essay. Contributors should include as much information on the image(s) as possible-failure to do so will result in the materials being returned without further consideration. At a minimum, image information should include the year (or approximate time period) the photograph was taken, who made the image (artist or photo credits), and where the graphic currently resides (archival source, if relevant). As with any Journal of Forestry graphical submission, the picture must be in the public domain or the contributor must have the right (or be granted permission) to allow the Journal to print the image. Picture the Past contributions should also include an informative narrative of up to 250 words per image to help place the photo in the proper historic context.

Publication of images or essays will depend on available journal space. As an editorial feature, narratives will be evaluated by the editor or an associate editor (or sent for additional expert consultation). English units are preferred. Journal style (including literature citations) is based on The Chicago Manual of Style, 14th or 15th Ed. (University of Chicago Press) and Scientific Style and Formats: The CBE Manual for Authors, Editors, and Publishers (Cambridge University Press). Submit your "Picture the Past" material(s) online at http://www.rapidreview.com/SAF/author.html.

Scientific Articles
All manuscripts submitted as scientific articles to the Journal of Forestry must include a section, approximately 200 words in length, that describes in practical terms what the results of the scientific study portrayed in the article imply for the practice of forest management and policy. This implications section must be clear, concise, and germane to forest management and policy as we face it today. It must not be a restatement of the causes or objectives of the study, although it may be related to them. This section should be presented as a "Management and Policy Implications" box near the beginning of the published manuscript to assist readers in identifying the relevance of the presented research to their professional lives or personal interests.

Research Articles—Maximum length is 4,500 words (excluding tables, figures, and Literature cited), plus a 150-word abstract and 200-word "Management and Policy Implications" sidebar. Literature citations should in most cases number 20 or fewer. Journal style (including literature citations) is based on The Chicago Manual of Style, 14th or 15th Ed. (University of Chicago Press) and Scientific Style and Formats: The CBE Manual for Authors, Editors, and Publishers (Cambridge University Press). English units are preferred. Manuscript guidelines are presented below. Submit your manuscript online at http://www.rapidreview.com/SAF/author.html. Because the review process is double-blind, please ensure that authors are not identified anywhere in the manuscript (including running heads and feet).

Review Articles—Maximum length is 6,000 words (excluding tables, figures, and Literature cited), plus a 150-word abstract and 200-word "Management and Policy Implications" sidebar. There is no limit to the number of literature citations in a review article. Journal style (including literature citations) is based on The Chicago Manual of Style, 14th or 15th Ed. (University of Chicago Press) and Scientific Style and Formats: The CBE Manual for Authors, Editors, and Publishers (Cambridge University Press). English units are preferred. Manuscript guidelines are presented below. Submit your manuscript online at http://www.rapidreview.com/SAF/author.html. Because the review process is double-blind, please ensure that authors are not identified anywhere in the manuscript (including running heads and feet).

Practice of Forestry—Articles submitted as "Practice of Forestry" should bridge the gap between science and decisionmaking in the field of forest management. Articles submitted should address a compelling need of forest and land managers, and should present the latest science in a management context. Presentation may vary from a case study of a particular problem or technique to an interpretation of the latest literature within the context of a specific management problem or question. A short glossary of technical terminology used in the article may be included, as well as a short list of selected readings for further evaluation of the ideas presented in the article. Maximum length is 4,500 words (excluding tables, figures, and Literature cited), plus a 150-word abstract and 200-word "Management and Policy Implications" sidebar. Journal style (including literature citations) is based on The Chicago Manual of Style, 14th or 15th Ed. (University of Chicago Press) and Scientific Style and Formats: The CBE Manual for Authors, Editors, and Publishers (Cambridge University Press). English units are preferred. Manuscript guidelines are presented below. Submit your manuscript online at http://www.rapidreview.com/SAF/author.html. Because the review process is double-blind, please ensure that authors are not identified anywhere in the manuscript (including running heads and feet).

Brief Communications—"Brief Communications" report preliminary or novel results on limited scientific data sets or applications of existing methodologies to new research areas and are subject to the same review policies as full-length research articles. Because the review process is double-blind, please ensure that authors are not identified anywhere in the manuscript (including running heads and feet). Maximum length is 2,500 words (excluding tables, figures, and Literature Cited), plus a 150-word abstract and 200-word "Management and Policy Implications" sidebar. English units are preferred. Footnotes should be incorporated into the text wherever possible or be presented as endnotes. Journal style (including literature citations) is based on The Chicago Manual of Style, 14th or 15th Ed. (University of Chicago Press) and Scientific Style and Formats: The CBE Manual for Authors, Editors, and Publishers (Cambridge University Press). Submit your manuscript online at http://www.rapidreview.com/SAF/author.html.

Field Notes—"Field Notes" are intended to disseminate information useful to practicing foresters that is otherwise inappropriate for scientific articles. Descriptions of new field techniques, novel computer algorithms or software applications, and interesting results from non-replicated administrative studies are some possible examples. The title of this article format must be preceded by "Field Note" (e.g., "Field Note: Oak Regeneration in Katrina Impacted Bottomlands"). These submissions are generally evaluated only by the editor and an associate editor, but may be sent for additional review depending on available expertise. Field Notes are NOT considered peer reviewed when published and are NOT outlets for reporting original research that, through faulty design or implementation, would not pass peer review. Maximum length is 2,500 words (excluding tables, figures, and Literature Cited), plus a 150-word abstract and 200-word "Management and Policy Implications" sidebar. English units are preferred. Footnotes should be incorporated into the text wherever possible or be presented as endnotes. Journal style (including literature citations) is based on The Chicago Manual of Style, 14th or 15th Ed. (University of Chicago Press) and Scientific Style and Formats: The CBE Manual for Authors, Editors, and Publishers (Cambridge University Press). Submit your manuscript online at http://www.rapidreview.com/SAF/author.html.


SUPPLEMENTAL GUIDELINES FOR SUBMISSIONS ON INTERNATIONAL FORESTS/FORESTRY

As a membership benefit of the Society of American Foresters, the Journal of Forestry represents the forestry profession in the United States. Although it is not international in scope, the Journal will consider publishing articles on forests, forest management, and forest policy from other parts of the world under certain circumstances. Contributions on forestry tools, technologies, and applications based on international forests and forestry should express their relevance to forest management in North America. Note that papers on international forests and forestry do NOT have to focus on North American species. However, manuscripts on North American species found elsewhere will be of particular interest to the readership, as will forest threats (e.g., insect pests, invasive plants, new diseases) or management practices relevant to North American forests, or socioeconomic issues and other human dimensions that could influence the practice of forestry in North America.

International forests and forestry submissions to the Journal must be complete and appropriately documented, preferably with readily accessible English language sources (when possible). All information must be presented in an accessible, cohesive fashion that provides a logical and orderly narrative. Authors are also reminded to write for a general audience (non-specialists) and to avoid excessive use of terminology not applied in North America. Contributions that lack North American relevance, are overly technical, narrowly focused, include too much jargon, or have only limited forestry application are probably more appropriate for other journals and will likely be rejected without further review.

Authors are strongly encouraged to help the readership understand international forests and the management and policy issues that affect them through a clear articulation of the concepts, including brief yet detailed descriptions of the trees, forests, geography, and history of the issues, when relevant. For example, international authors should not assume that the readers will be familiar with the geography of the region, and should consider providing a map with key landmarks, especially those referenced in the manuscript. In addition, full-color images showing examples of the trees, forests, forest threats, or other environmental conditions being described in the manuscript would be very beneficial.

International submissions can fall under any of the conventional Journal of Forestry manuscript categories and are expected to follow the same requirements, including content, length, and style. In addition to submissions consistent with the more conventional editorial and scientific features, manuscripts that are largely descriptive of the forests or forest practices of a country or region outside of North America will also be considered. These descriptions should be sufficiently detailed and include visual aids to help the Journal's readership better understand forest and management conditions. These aids may include (but are not restricted to): maps of forest cover; images of characteristic tree species, forest types, management practices, and/or forest threats; tables of forest cover (including current or historic), productivity by forest type, land-use patterns/trends, and/or other demographic trends; and charts explaining attributes of the forests.

Style and Form
Submissions on international forests and forestry must follow Journal style and formatting conventions when submitted-manuscripts that do not will be returned to authors without peer review. Unless English is their first language, international authors are strongly encouraged to get a native English-speaking colleague to review their manuscript PRIOR to submission to ensure terminology, grammar, and technical references are appropriate for the readership. If collegial review is not available, a number of commercial technical writing services can be suggested by the Managing Editor (contact Matthew Walls, wallsm@safnet.org, for further information). The use of a commercial technical writing service does not imply an agreement to accept a submission for publication, nor will it guarantee the manuscript will even be reviewed if deemed ill-suited for the Journal of Forestry.

Nomenclature and Terminology—Taxonomic references should follow accepted conventions stated in the Melbourne Code of 2011 (International Code of Nomenclature; McNeill et al. 2012). Common names are used for most plants, animals, and fungi (when possible). Scientific names must accompany common names, and should be italicized and placed in parentheses following the first use of a common name. Proper usage of singular or plural for genera references is also required-a single species is abbreviated as "sp.", while multiple species are "spp." For example: "Of the various maples (Acer spp.) possible on this urban site, the ability of hedge maple (Acer campestre) to tolerate dry conditions and compacted soils made it preferable to Norway (Acer platanoides) and sugar (Acer saccharum) maples." Species naming authorities are not required, but if used should follow international conventions and be consistently applied for all scientific name references (for example: Acer campestre L.). The Checklist of United States Trees (Native and Naturalized) (Little 1979), The PLANTS Database (USDA NRCS 2013), and the appendixes of Forest Cover Types of the United States and Canada (Eyre 1980) are useful references for plant names and include many species from outside of North America.

The use of forestry terms should be consistent with The Dictionary of Forestry produced by the Society of American Foresters (www.dictionaryofforestry.org; Helms 1998). Country- or region-specific technical terms or jargon not found in The Dictionary of Forestry should be clearly defined in the text, a footnote, or a brief glossary accompanying the article. American versions of English words (including spellings) should be used-for example, use "center" not "centre" or "tons" not "tonnes" or "truck" not "lorry". In addition, English units of measurement are strongly preferred. If metric units are used, they must be included parenthetically after the English units [e.g., "After treatment, the pines averaged 100 ft (30.5 m) tall and 20 in. (50 cm) in dbh."]. Be consistent in unit usage throughout the manuscript.

Literature Cited—Do not abbreviate the names or titles of foreign references, as it can be very difficult to locate these without the full text. When at all possible, references from international sources should parenthetically provide an English translation for the title, especially when the material comes from a hard-to-access source. For example: Asan, √ú. 1995. Orman Kaynaklarinin Rasyonel Kullanimi ve √úlkemizdeki Durum (Status of rational use of forest resources in our country). Istanbul University Journal of the Faculty of Forestry B(3-4):15-27.

Literature Cited
Eyre, F.H. (editor). 1980. Forest cover types of the United States and Canada. Society of American Foresters, Bethesda, MD. 148 p.
Helms, J.A. (editor). 1998. The dictionary of forestry. Society of American Foresters, Bethesda, MD. 210 p. Available online at www.dictionaryofforestry.org.
Little, Jr., E.L. 1979. Checklist of United States trees (native and naturalized). USDA Agriculture Handbook 541. 375 p.
McNeill, J., F.R. Barrie, W.R. Buck, V. Demoulin, W. Greuter, D.L. Hawksworth, P.S. Herendeen, et al. 2012. International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi and plants (Melbourne Code). International Association for Plant Taxonomy, Koeltz Scientific Books, Koenigstein, Germany. 240 p.
USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (USDA NRCS). 2013. The PLANTS Database. Available online at www.plants.usda.gov; last accessed Feb. 15 2013.


STYLE AND FORM

Nomenclature and Terminology
Common names are used for most plants and animals. Scientific names are included in parentheses following the first use of the common name. The Checklist of United States Trees (Native and Naturalized) by E.L. Little Jr. (Agriculture Handbook 541, USDA 1979) and the appendixes of Forest Cover Types of the United States and Canada (SAF 1980) are useful references for plant names. Technical usage in forestry and allied fields follows The Dictionary of Forestry (SAF 1998).

Mathematical Material
Articles submitted to the Journal of Forestry should only include mathematics if they are necessary to support the conclusions of the manuscript. See Scientific Style and Formats: The CBE Manual for Authors, Editors, and Publishers (Cambridge University Press) for methods of presenting mathematical material in the simplest form to ensure accuracy and prompt publication of paper.

Literature Cited
Literature citations are to provide the reader with enough information to find a document from the appropriate source. This information should be stated in a clear and concise manner. Theses and unpublished papers may be included sparingly. Only those appearing in the text should appear in the citation list at the end of the article. Personal communications should be cited in the text and should include the affiliation of the person and the date of the communication: (John Helms, pers. comm., University of California-Berkeley, Aug. 10, 2006).

List all references alphabetically at the end of the paper and cite them parenthetically in the text by the author-date system, e.g. (Smith 2006). Directly quoted material must include the page number, e.g., (Smith 2006, p. 17). If a citation includes three or more authors, use "et al." where cited in the text, e.g., (Smith et al. 2006), but list authors accordingly with the citation: for citations with ten authors or fewer, all should be listed; for citations with eleven or more, only the first seven should be listed, followed by "et al." Where possible, limit the number of citations to three per set of parentheses. Arrange references cited together within parentheses chronologically. Publications by the same author(s) in the same year should be listed as 2006a, 2006b, etc.

Examples of Literature Cited style:
Book
Houghton, J.T., G.J. Jenkins, and J.J. Ephraums. 1990. Climate change: The IPCC scientific assessment. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom. 365 p.

Chapter in Book
Brokaw, N.V.L. 1982. Treefalls: Frequency timing and consequences. P. 101-108 in The ecology of a tropical forest: Seasonal rhythms and long term changes, Leigh, E.G., Jr., A.S. Rand, and D.M. Windsor (eds.). Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, DC.

Article in Journal
Jurgensen, M.F., J. Johnson, M.A. Wise, C.S. Williams, and R. Wilson. 1997. Impacts of timber harvesting on soil organic matter, nitrogen, productivity, and health of Inland Northwest forests. For. Sci. 43(2):234-251.

Proceedings
Blake, J.I., G.L. Somers, and G.A. Ruark. 1990. Perspectives on process modeling of forest growth responses to environmental stress. P. 9-20 in Proc. of conf. on Process modeling of forest growth responses to environmental stress, Dixon, R.K. (ed.). Timber Press, Portland, OR.

Technical Report
Mason, R.R., and H.G. Paul. 1994. Monitoring larval populations of the Douglas-fir tussock moth and western spruce budworm on permanent plots: Sampling methods and statistical properties of data. USDA For. Serv. Gen. Tech. Rep. PNW-GTR-333. 22 p.

Thesis/Dissertation
Korol, R.L. 1985. The soil and water regime of uneven-age interior Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca). M.Sc. thesis, Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C., Canada. 164 p.

Web Publications
USDA Forest Service. 2002. The process predicament: How statutory, regulatory, and administrative factors affect national forest management. Available online at www.fs.fed.us/publications.html; last accessed Apr. 15, 2005.

Tables and Figures
The critical test for a table or figure is that it is the best way to communicate the information that it contains. Captions and titles for tables and figures should have enough detail so the table or figure will stand alone. Tables should not duplicate data presented in figures. Details about preparing tables and figures can be found in Scientific Style and Formats: The CBE Manual for Authors, Editors, and Publishers (Cambridge University Press) and in The Chicago Manual of Style, 14th or 15th Ed. (University of Chicago Press). Suggestions for preparing clear tables and figures are presented in "What I Meant to Say Was..." Tips and Resources for Improving Your Professional Communication Skills (The Irland Group, RFD #2, Box 9200, Winthrop, Maine 04364).

All tables and figures must be cited in numerical order in the text. Place each table and figure on a separate page with its title at top. Place table titles and figure captions together at the end of the manuscript. Figures must be submitted as separate high-resolution EPS, TIFF, or JPG files. Do not embed figures within the manuscript file.

Tables should be double-spaced; however, exceedingly large tables may be single-spaced to reduce the number of pages they cover. Tables should be sized to fit on a single 8.5 by 11 page in portrait orientation NOT landscape. Total table width should be no more than 7 in.; total table height should be no more than 9.66 in. including the table title and table footnote(s). Table titles, column heads, and side heads should be in initial cap and lowercase, not all caps. Single-weight horizontal lines should go across the top of the table body, below the column headings, and below the table. Vertical lines should not be used to separate columns. Units should appear under the column heading, but above the line separating the headings from the body of the table, except when two or more consecutive columns have the same units; then the unit is under the line separating the headings and the body, in parentheses, centered over the applicable column, and preceded and followed by ellipses extending over applicable columns. Table footnotes may be designated with numbers or letters or symbols; choose the one that is least confusing with other entries in the table (e.g., exponents, letters indicating significantly different means, and asterisks indicating significance) and be consistent among the tables. The sequence for symbols in table footnotes is asterisk, dagger, double dagger, section mark, parallel lines, number symbol. Use abbreviations consistent with SAF style. Common abbreviations are yr (year and years), dbh (not DBH), bd ft, mbf, ac, ha, ht, vol, m3, ft2, in. (inch and inches), cm, g, lb.

Figures may be maps, diagrams, photographs, or summaries of results, such as bar charts and line graphs. The line weight for rules should be at least 1 point (no hairline rules). Captions appear at the bottom of the figure in the journal, but are listed on a separate page at the end of the manuscript. Captions should not appear on the figure itself. Use abbreviations consistent with SAF style. Common abbreviations are yr (year and years), dbh (not DBH), bd ft, mbf, ac, ha, ht, vol, m3, ft2, in. (inch and inches), cm, g, lb. Labels for figures should be in initial cap and lowercase, not all caps. Avoid fake 3-D and other effects that add to the complexity of the figure, but not to its ability to communicate. Figures may be presented in color or black and white. There are no fees associated with the publication of color figures. If using black and white, use fill patterns or shadings with sufficient contrast so that they are distinguishable when reproduced in black and white. Avoid the use of gray or colored backgrounds in graphs and charts.


SUPPLEMENTAL MATERIALS

The Journal of Forestry permits authors to upload supplementary data for online storage and distribution with their accepted manuscripts. By definition, supplementary materials are not essential to the manuscript but are specifically relevant to their article and may help readers better understand their work, particularly if available in a format (e.g., data sets, video or audio files, maps, other images, detailed calculations or equation derivations, examples, source code or programs, statistical analysis code) not conducive for a printed outlet.

Supplementary data should be uploaded in Rapid Review at the time of submission, or early in the review process if specifically requested by an associate editor or reviewer and agreed to by the authors. To avoid any possible errors in presentation, supplemental material(s) are not edited or peer-reviewed, and hence should be provided in final form when submitted. It is therefore the authors' sole responsibility to ensure that supplemental materials are accurate. Authors must certify that there are no copyright issues with any supplemental materials, and avoid including any previously published materials without appropriate permissions. Supplemental documents should stand-alone and be fully referenced as appropriate, but avoid using internet links or references. Reference to each piece of supplemental material should be made in proper context in the text of the article, with an "S" placed in front of each reference (e.g., Table S1, Figure S2, Video Clip S3).

A list of supplementary materials should be provided by the authors at the end of their manuscript (following the Literature Cited section) with a descriptive, one-line caption included for each unique supplement. The following example demonstrates this formatting:

SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIALS

Supplement 1. Video clip of modified skyline logging system using new rigging structure in steep terrain.

Supplement 2.bFORTRAN code of program developed to simulate different stress loads of modified skyline logging system under different wind conditions, soil conditions, and types of timber.

Supplement 3. R program written to conduct nonlinear ordinary least squares regression on modified skyline logging productivity function.

Supplement 4. ASCII text file of an example data set required by the R program in Supplement 3.

Supplement 5. PDF of survey mailed to skyline logging operations in the Pacific Northwest used to identify the most popular current systems in use.

All files uploaded as supplements should have their preferred version of the commercial software listed, and if possible be presented in formats that can be read in free, publicly available programs (e.g., PDF or ASCII files for text documents rather than those in a native (proprietary) word processor or spreadsheet format). There is a 10 MB limit to supplemental files that can be uploaded. Supplementary data should not contain certain types of files, such as executable files (e.g., *.exe, *.com) or those script or macro files (e.g., *.vbs) or compressed files (e.g., *.zip) that are vulnerable to malware. Inappropriate materials should not be included.


RIGHTS AND PERMISSIONS

The Society of American Foresters holds copyright to the Journal of Forestry, and authors will be asked to assign their rights before their contributions are published. A form will be provided for this purpose. Authors whose work is not subject to copyright, e.g., federal government employees, should so state when they submit their manuscripts.

Authors of articles published within the Journal of Forestry retain the following rights:

  • the right to use the journal article, in full or in part, for their own personal use, including classroom teaching;
  • the right to use the journal article, in full or in part, in preparation of derivative works, extension of the article into book-length, or other works, provide that it is accompanied by a full acknowledgement of the original publication;
  • the right to include the journal article, in full or in part, in a thesis or dissertation, provided it is not published commercially;
  • the right to post a pre-print version of the journal article, revised if desired to reflect any changes made in the peer review process, on the author's personal web site or within any institutional repository maintained by the authors' employer, provided it include the complete citation and a link to the printed version on the Journal of Forestry web site; the web site or repository must not charge a fee for document delivery or article access;
  • the right to of the author's employer to use the material in any intra-company use; reproduction for commercial redistribution would require permission from SAF;
  • patent, trademark, or other rights related to processes described within the article.

To request permission to make multiple or systematic reproductions or to republish material (including figure and article excerpts) in any manner not outlined above, contact:

    Customer Service Department
    Copyright Clearance Center, Inc. (CCC)
    222 Rosewood Drive
    Danvers, MA 01923
    (978) 750-8400
    Fax: (978) 750-4470
    www.copyright.com

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