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Western Journal of Applied Forestry Online Quiz
Derived from the July 2013 Western Journal of Applied Forestry
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The Western Journal of Applied Forestry Quiz is approved for 2.5 continuing forestry education (CFE) credit hours in Category 1-CF by the Society of American Foresters. Successful completion of the self-assessment, defined as a cumulative score of at least 70%, is required to earn CFE credit. CFE approval is valid for one year from the issue date of publication, and participants may submit the quiz at any time during that period.

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1. In the study by Puhlick et al., the high variation in height growth of ponderosa pine seedlings within the same stand may be due to:
a) site index.
b) average stand basal area.
c) localized competition for soil moisture and nutrients among seedlings and herbaceous grasses, and/or damage to individual seedlings.
2. Puhlick et al. caution that the recruitment trends presented in this study reflect conditions:
a) on only sedimentary and basalt parent materials.
b) across a broad geographic region encompassing Arizona and New Mexico.
c) following shelterwood establishment cuts that occurred in the early 1990s.
3. According to the study by Sheridan et al., the main difference between factors important in Douglas-fir bark furrows in trees in young stands and trees in old stands was:
a) surrounding tree densities (RD) were important in trees in old stands.
b) there were no differences in important factors for trees in in young stands and trees in old stands.
c) growth (PAI) was not an important factor related to furrow response in trees in old stands.
4. What reasons seems most likely for the lack of bark-foraging bird response to Douglas-fir bark furrow characteristics in the study by Sheridan et al.?
a) Low sample size
b) Lack of a range in bark furrow conditions with biological importance
c) Tree age
5. Which of the following factors were found to be highly correlated in the study by Newton and Cole?
a) cover and radiation
b) radiation and change in maximum stream temperature
c) cover and change in maximum stream temperature
6. In the study by Newton and Cole, the ability to estimate any gains or reductions in stream temperature over time was complicated by:
a) beaver activity
b) year-to-year variation in stream temperature
c) benthic insect productivity
7. Regarding wood density, which of three statements was found to be true in the study by Lutes and Hardy?
a) Assessing the external characteristics of down woody material can be used to estimate wood density with the same precision as pieces that are destructively sampled.
b) There was no evidence that logs segmented with a chainsaw decay faster than pieces that were not segmented.
c) There was no evidence that logs in contact with the ground decay faster than logs suspended above the ground.
8. In the Lute and Hardy study, decay rate was compared to decay rates published in five other studies in the same general region of North America. Which answer most accurately reflects decay rates in general and the decay rate calculated for this study?
a) The decomposition process is dependent on numerous factors so decay rate is quite variable. The decay rate in central Montana was slower than published in most of the other studies.
b) From the study by Lutes and Hardy, the decomposition process is basically the same for all study sites because they are all in the same general region of North America. The decay rate in central Montana was similar to the rates published in most of the other studies..
c) The decomposition process is dependent on numerous factors that were all controlled in this study so the decay rate in central Montana was similar to the rates published in most of the other studies.
9. Which of the following statements about logging damage from the study by Brodie and DeBell is true?
a) Logging damage was severe in the lightest retention level due to the large number of stems removed and it is predicted to have a significant effect on the wood quality of the overstory trees.
b) Logging damage was widespread in all treatments, but was rarely severe enough to affect growth or wood quality of the tree.
c) Logging damage was most severe in the heaviest retention level because the large number of stems remaining restricted felling and placement of skid trails.
10. Is Thuja plicata a viable species to consider planting in the understory of two-aged stands of the densities shown in the study by Brodie and DeBell?
a) More research is needed on the interaction between overstory density and the amount of browse from deer and elk.
b) No, damage from deer and elk browsing was too severe for this species to be considered in these systems.
c) Yes, as a shade-tolerant species, Thuja plicata is ideal for planting in the understory of two-aged systems.