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Western Journal of Applied Forestry Online Quiz
Derived from the October 2013 Western Journal of Applied Forestry
Cost: $25 members      $35 nonmembers
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The Western Journal of Applied Forestry Quiz is approved for 3.0 continuing forestry education (CFE) credit hours in Category 1-CF by the Society of American Foresters. Successful completion of the self-assessment, defined as a cumulative score of at least 70%, is required to earn CFE credit. CFE approval is valid for one year from the issue date of publication, and participants may submit the quiz at any time during that period.

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1. In their study, Wang and Stewart focus on transition analysis for modulus of elasticity (MOE) because:
a) MOE is best described by quadratic function.
b) MOE is related to wood strength and is a key contributor to lumber quality.
c) MOE is best understood by sawyers.
2. In the Wang and Stewart analysis, the transition point between juvenile and mature wood, based on modulus of elasticity, was not significantly related, in any of the models, to:
a) tree diameter.
b) site index.
c) crown length.
3. Prestemon et al. simulated the impact of doubling mill processing capacity in Montana and Colorado by:
a) assuming that profits from timber salvage would stimulate timber demand growth in the private sector.
b) assuming that green energy subsidies would double the timber demand.
c) hypothetically doubling the mill capacity in these states without specifying how such a doubling would occur.
4. The simulations by Prestemon et al. show that salvage would not generate positive net revenues in the interior western states of:
a) Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, Montana, South Dakota, Utah, or Wyoming
b) Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, South Dakota, Utah, or Washington
c) Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, South Dakota, Utah, or Wyoming
5. As discussed in the Ball and Taecker article, felling mountain pine beetle-infested trees and cutting the trunk into short sections is an example of:
a) alternative control.
b) direct control.
c) indirect control.
6. In the Ball and Taecker study, brood survival in logs compared to survival in standing infested trees was:
a) 21 % - 24%
b) 25%
c) 75%
7. Cerise et al. observed an increase in which of the following in all harvested sites regardless of site preparation techniques?
a) Organic matter
b) Soil C
c) Spotted knapweed
8. Cerise et al. conclude that 45 years later, standard and terracing site preparation techniques on the their study area in the BNF:
a) expressed detrimental impacts on water quality.
b) expressed detrimental impacts on timber productivity.
c) did not express detrimental impacts on timber productivity.
9. When Douglas-fir tussock moth consumed foliage from trees treated with bole-injected systemic insecticides, significant mortality was observed by Cook et al. as early as:
a) 1 week following consumption of the foliage.
b) 2 weeks following consumption of the foliage.
c) 4 weeks following consumption of the foliage. .
10. Cook et al. found that fir coneworm damage was:
a) lowest in the trees that had received either a fall or spring bole-injection treatment of emamectin benzoate
b) lowest in the trees that had received either a fall or spring bole-injection treatment of imidacloprid.
c) not significantly different from the control with either treatment.