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March 20, 2015

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For the latest forestry news, see the "Forestry News" section of the SAF homepage.

In This Issue ...

I. Featured News

1. South Leads US Timber Industry
2. New Jersey: Stockton Aims to Save Its Surrounding Forest
3. Missouri: White Oak Mortality in the Ozarks
4. Oregon: Legislature Begins Negotiating Weed Killer Spray Reforms
5. Iowa: State's Largest Nursery Could Be on the Chopping Block
6. Kentucky: Group Plants Trees as Part of Effort to Reforest Strip-Mined Land

II. Federal Lands Management

1. Oregon Judge Orders Tougher Look at Forestry Project
2. Forester No Stranger to Controversy
3. Forest Service Approves Atlantic Coast Pipeline Survey through George Washington National Forest
4. Prescott Forest Kicks Off Timber Sales under Landscape-Scale Project
5. US Rep. LaMalfa Pushes for Hearings on Forest Service Goals

III. International Forestry News

1. Timber Trouble: Karakoram Forest Cover Vanishing
2. Biodiversity Protected Areas in Indonesia Ineffective in Preventing Deforestation
3. Law Endangering Istanbul's Forests To Be Taken to Constitutional Court

IV. Forest Products Industry

1. Georgia Timber Growers Feel Slighted by Green Building Group
2. The Role of Forestry in Indiana, Louisiana Economies
3. Studies Detail Monetary Value of Montana's Forests and Rivers
4. Montana: Marshall Woods Project Hinges on Rattlesnake Logging
5. Long-Awaited Sealaska Land Transfer Completed

V. Biomass

1. Burning Wood for Electricity: New Demands, New Questions
2. Oregon Biomass Electricity Plant Effort Seeks Energy Buyer
3. Red Rock Biofuels Raises Cash, Gets Ready for First Refinery
4. Europe Carbon Trade Would Gain Extra $1.1 Billion from Biomass
5. Blazing a Trail for Biomass Apprentices

VI. Urban Forestry

1. Ash Borers Take Bite Out of Leafy Canopy
2. Charlotte Officials Say Remove Tree Bands Now
3. Urban Trees Face "Survivor" Style Challenges

VII. Plants and Pests

1. This Cold Winter Is Too "Woolly" for Hemlock Pests
2. The Bug That's Eating the Woods
3. Emerald Ash Borer Now in 19 Iowa Counties

VIII. Science and Research

1. Post-Fire Logging Can Reduce Fuels for Up to 40 Years
2. Cascades Study May Rewrite the Textbook on Forest Growth and Death
3. Science Paper: First Guidebook for Ecosystem Services

IX. Items of Interest

1. Looking for Long-Term Benefits: North Carolina State Announces New Plans for the Hofmann Forest
2. Yale Students Turn to Crowdfunding to Cover the Costs of Forestry Research
3. "Living with Fire" Receives National Award

X. SAF News

1. Gregory Award Scholarship Now Accepting Applications
2. SAF Forest Policy News
3. Coming in the April 2015 Issue of Forest Science
4. SAF State Society Meetings
5. 2015 SAF National Convention News
6. SAF Member "Media Moments"


I. Featured News

1. South Leads US Timber Industry

Oconeeenterprise.com (March 18) - Speaking at a dinner hosted jointly by AgSouth Credit and Southeastern Land Sales, Brooks Mendell, president of Forisk Consulting, said that the South holds all of the cards in comparison with other regions in terms of timber production.

Domestically, the Southeast and the Northwest are the major players in the timber market in the United States. The Northeast and the Great Lakes produce some timber, but they lack the natural resources to compete with the other areas. Mendell said that the South has a decided advantage because the bulk of its timber is privately owned.

Note: Mendell is a member of SAF.

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2. New Jersey: Stockton Aims to Save Its Surrounding Forest

Philly.com (March 16) - Stockton University professor George Zimmerman takes his students into the Pine Barrens that surround the Atlantic County, New Jersey school like a vast emerald ocean. They walk among shortleaf pines, white oaks, red maples, and Atlantic white cedars while taking up tough questions: How can they manage the forest's health? How can they protect it from fires, pathogens, and insects?

For the first time, students will try to answer these questions during regular field visits, as Stockton's 1,500-acre forest becomes a sprawling laboratory.

Within weeks, the university will begin executing the state's first comprehensive stewardship plan on public land in the Pinelands.

Note: Bob Williams, CF, Forestry consultant and SAF member is quoted.

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3. Missouri: White Oak Mortality in the Ozarks

KBIA.org (March 17) - Pioneer Forest is located in the Missouri Ozarks and sustainably harvests timber on its vast holdings-holdings that are in the heart of the area hardest hit by white oak mortality.

The company's foresters believe the hypoxylon canker they feel caused rapid white oak mortality on its land has run its course. Others say white oak mortality is more complex than that.

Note: University of Missouri Forestry Professor and SAF member Rose-Marie Muzika is quoted in the article.

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4. Oregon: Legislature Begins Negotiating Weed Killer Spray Reforms

OregonLive.com (March 16) - Oregon state legislators, industry, and environment representatives are beginning to reconcile reform proposals for state laws governing the spray of herbicides from helicopters.

A 2014 investigation by The Oregonian/OregonLive found that Oregon does less than neighboring states to protect people and the environment from chemicals sprayed to control weeds after clearcuts.

State Sen. Chris Edwards (D), who convened a legislative working group scheduled to start meeting March 17, told The Oregonian/OregonLive he expects the issue to be one of the most contentious facing the 2015 legislature.

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5. Iowa: State's Largest Nursery Could Be on the Chopping Block

KCCI.com (March 16) - A nearly 80-year-old nursery is in jeopardy of closing its doors. Officials with the Iowa Department of Natural Resources (DNR) said a shrinking state budget gives them no choice.

By law, the state forest nursery must be self-supporting, as revenue is supposed to cover all cost of operations. According to reports, the nursery is losing $500,000 a year.

The nursery produces 1 to 1.5 million plants per year. According to DNR officials, the problem is that fewer people are buying. The nursery has been operating at a financial loss over the past four years.

More:

Few Options Remain for DNR's State Nursery
WCFcourier.com (March 16)

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6. Kentucky: Group Plants Trees as Part of Effort to Reforest Strip-Mined Land

Kentucky.com (March 15) - The goal of the nonprofit Green Forests Work is to re-establish healthy forests on surface-mined land in eastern Kentucky and other parts of Appalachia.

Much of that mined land was forested before the companies cleared trees and blasted away the tops and sides of steep slopes to uncover coal. In reclaiming the land, companies often planted grasses and plants not native to eastern Kentucky to control erosion. That converted hundreds of thousands of acres of woodland to open sites, eliminating habitat for some species and altering the natural ecology.

Since then, researchers at the University of Kentucky, Virginia Tech, and other schools figured out how to make reclaimed mine land stable and grow trees native to the region.

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II. Federal Lands Management

1. Oregon Judge Orders Tougher Look at Forestry Project

Columbian.com (March 17) - US District Judge Ann Aiken has ruled that federal forest managers have to take a harder look at the environmental harm that could be caused by a new forestry project planned in northern spotted owl habitat as a way to break a logjam over timber harvests in the Northwest.

The judge ruled that the environmental analysis the US Bureau of Land Management did on the White Castle timber sale outside Roseburg was inadequate and ordered a more stringent environmental impact statement.

She found BLM didn't consider how logging mature forest would harm the spotted owl, a threatened species, and the agency should have considered more than one alternative for analysis. Specifically, BLM should have looked at logging in a younger forest as well as the mature forest where the project was sited.

More:

Long Road Lies Ahead for Northwest Forest Plan Update
KUOW.org (March 16)

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2. Forester No Stranger to Controversy

CapitalPress.com (March 15) - Forester Norm Johnson was enticed by "a career that let me wander around the woods," but his time is often spent in the thicket of controversy.

During his three decades as a forestry professor at Oregon State University, Johnson has shaped key federal forest policies while drawing fire from environmentalists and the timber industry.

Note: Johnson is a member of SAF.

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3. Forest Service Approves Atlantic Coast Pipeline Survey through George Washington National Forest

NewsAdvance.com (March 18) - The US Forest Service will allow Dominion Transmission Inc. to survey a path for the Atlantic Coast Pipeline through the George Washington National Forest in Virginia's Highland and Augusta counties.

The Forest Service announced March 17 that it would issue a temporary special-use permit to allow surveying along 12.6 miles of the forest, but made clear the decision does not represent approval of the $5 billion, 550-mile pipeline proposed from West Virginia to southeastern Virginia and North Carolina.

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4. Prescott Forest Kicks Off Timber Sales under Landscape-Scale Project

DCourier.com (March 15) - The first timber sale under the Prescott National Forest's Bradshaw Vegetation Management Project is reducing the unnatural density of the ponderosa pine forest in a key spot for protecting the Prescott area from wildfires.

The 47,000-acre Bradshaw Vegetation project is the largest restoration effort to date on the forest. The aim is to restore the forest to more natural conditions and help prevent unnatural catastrophic wildfires.

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5. US Rep. LaMalfa Pushes for Hearings on Forest Service Goals

TheUnion.com (California, March 13) - According to US Rep. Doug LaMalfa, the US Forest Service is not meeting its goals on forest management to prevent wildfires, or to quickly salvage burned timber after fires.

LaMalfa (R), vice-chair of the public lands subcommittee of Congress's Natural Resources Committee, said the hearing date has not yet been scheduled but that he is pushing for it to happen sometime this year.

He also is planning to reintroduce a bill that would create a separate emergency fund for fire suppression, apart from the "green" fund budget for forest thinning, permitting, planning, and maintenance.

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III. International Forestry News

1. Timber Trouble: Karakoram Forest Cover Vanishing

Tribune.com.pk (March 13) - Widespread deforestation and felling of trees has denuded large swathes of forest area in Gilgit-Baltistan (G-B), Pakistan.

According to experts, the continuous illegal felling of trees such as pine, kail, and deodar forest cover in G-B has eroded more than 50 percent in the past 20 years-down from 640,000 hectares to just 295,000 hectares.

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2. Biodiversity Protected Areas in Indonesia Ineffective in Preventing Deforestation

US.edu.sg (March 16) - Establishing protected areas in forests is one way to keep deforestation at bay and safeguard biodiversity. However, a study led by researchers from the National University of Singapore has revealed that such a measure is ineffective in the case of biodiversity-focused protected areas in Indonesia.

The research found that the monitoring and prevention of road construction within protected areas and stepping up control measures in illegal logging hotspots would be more effective for conservation than reliance on protected areas alone.

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3. Law Endangering Istanbul's Forests To Be Taken to Constitutional Court

National.bgnnews.com (March 17) - A parliamentary bill that would pave the way for development in vast forested areas surrounding the third airport's construction site in northern Istanbul will be challenged in Constitutional Court.

Critics warn that the 2014 amendment to the forestry law, which allows for building, operating, and transfer rights in forest zones for free to any company who wins the procurement tender for highways and roads, will spell an environmental catastrophe for Istanbul's northern areas.

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IV. Forest Products Industry

1. Georgia Timber Growers Feel Slighted by Green Building Group

Tiftongazette.com (March 15) - The timber industry's long-running "wood wars" are playing out under the Gold Dome, this time pitting the state's forestry industry against green building advocates.

Purveyors of the popular LEED building program are so partial to arbors grown under the standards of the international Forest Stewardship Council that they award credit to projects using that wood.

In Georgia, that class of trees is in the minority. Of the state's 24 million acres of private forestland, only 32,000 acres can claim a Forest Stewardship Council certification.

Advocates for foresters say that puts Georgia's timber at a disadvantage, as about 4.7 million acres of the state's private forests are certified under standards not recognized by LEED.

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2. The Role of Forestry in Indiana, Louisiana Economies

Agriculture Contributes $44.1 Billion to Indiana's Economy

News.Indiana.edu (March 16) - Agricultural industries in Indiana account for more than $31 billion in direct sales and nearly $13 billion more in ripple effects, such as related supply-chain purchases and spending by workers, according to a new report from Indiana University's Kelley School of Business.

The new report, "Beyond the Farm: A State and Regional Report on the Economic Contribution of Farms, Forests and Related Industries," also said that the state's agricultural output supports nearly 190,000 Hoosier jobs. Of those jobs, 107,500 are directly involved in agricultural production and processing.

Using the most recent census data available from the US Department of Agriculture, researchers at the Indiana Business Research Center found that agriculture creates $14.9 billion in value added-an amount equal to nearly 5 percent of Indiana's gross domestic product.

LSU AgCenter: State's Forestry Industry Is Healthy and Growing

Redriverradio.org (March 17) - More than 150 timber landowners participated in Central Louisiana's Forestry Forum. LSU AgCenter forestry extension agent Robbie Hutchins organized the meeting. He says the state's timber industry has fully recovered from the 2008 financial crisis, due in large part to an emerging market for woody biomass.

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3. Studies Detail Monetary Value of Montana's Forests and Rivers

Helenair.com (March 15) - Natural resources managers recently released economic numbers for some of the Helena area's most visible natural resources: the Helena and Lewis and Clark National Forests and the Missouri River. While those amenities contribute beyond the scope of the studies, the reports show the public land and water driving nearly $120 million annually.

In 2014, preliminary numbers showed 11 million tourists visited Montana, spending nearly $4 billion.

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4. Montana: Marshall Woods Project Hinges on Rattlesnake Logging

Missoulian.com (March 15) - A 13,000-acre project to revitalize the forest in Missoula's Rattlesnake and Marshall drainages may hinge on 225 acres of commercial logging.

The project will affect about 4,000 acres with prescribed burning, thinning, replanting, hazardous fuels removal, weed treatment, and logging in a big block north of Mount Jumbo.

Treated areas will have about 50 percent of the understory removed, especially trees infected with root-rot, mountain pine beetle, or overcrowded conditions.

But the part most Missoulians will notice involves cutting about 80 truckloads of sawlogs from the hillsides along the main Rattlesnake Creek corridor trail. That area is in the Rattlesnake National Recreation Area, not the Rattlesnake Wilderness farther north.

Related:

Expert: Timber Industry Needs Forest Service Land to Survive

KULR8.com (March 18) - Senators Steve Daines and Jon Tester urge the US Forest Service to substantially increase Montana's timber harvest.

Some say it's essential for the survival of the timber industry.

Peter Kolb, the Montana State University Extension Forestry Specialist, says Montana's lumber mills are mostly dependent on wood from private land. Simply put, this won't last much longer and without using National Forest Service trees, it could put hundreds of jobs in jeopardy.

Note: Kolb is a member of SAF.

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5. Long-Awaited Sealaska Land Transfer Completed

Alaskajournal.com (March 12) - Sealaska Corporation-the southeast Alaska Native regional corporation-officially took title of 70,075 acres of formerly federal land March 6 during a ceremony at the company's headquarters in Juneau.

The more than 68,400 acres of the land-once Tongass National Forest-will be managed primarily for timber harvest and was selected with that purpose in mind, Sealaska leaders said.

Sealaska President and CEO Anthony Mallott said the land transfer provides a time to reflect on Alaska Native history and will be a major benefit to Sealaska, its shareholders, and the entirety of southeast Alaska for years to come.

More Alaska forestry news:

Draft Southeast State Forest Plan Available for Comment
JuneauEmpire.com (March 13)

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V. Biomass

1. Burning Wood for Electricity: New Demands, New Questions

TheConversation.com (March 18) - Europe has created a market for large-scale pellet production by requiring every member country to increase their use of renewable energy and reduce their greenhouse gas emissions. Wood pellets are being used to replace coal by co-firing with coal in some older plants. In addition, new pellet-only capacity has been added to the European grid. Forests in the southeastern United States supplied nearly four million tons of wood pellets to European power generators in 2014.

But can forests provide a fuel source for power generation, while also supplying existing paper industries? Is burning biomass better than burning coal? Are current US and EU policies adequately addressing forest sustainability? To answer these questions, the authors have been researching how forests work, both ecologically and economically.

Note: SAF members Robert C. Abt and Karen Lee Abt authored this article.

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2. Oregon Biomass Electricity Plant Effort Seeks Energy Buyer

Columbian.com (March 18) - A wood-burning power plant remains a possibility for La Pine, Oregon, with the city now taking the lead on the project from Deschutes County and the company behind it waiting for a change in the energy market.

The $75 million, 25-megawatt biomass plant would produce enough electricity to power about 19,000 homes. The plant would burn wood-limbs and other scrap left over after logging, debris from thinning projects and urban waste-to heat water, create steam, and turn a turbine.

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3. Red Rock Biofuels Raises Cash, Gets Ready for First Refinery

Xconomy.com (March 17) - Red Rock has announced an investment deal with Flagship Ventures of Cambridge, Massachusetts. Although Red Rock is not disclosing the amount of the investment, the deal gives Red Rock a bit more cash to build its first production refinery in Lakeview, Oregon. The facility will convert about 140,000 dry tons of woody biomass into 12 million gallons of diesel, jet fuel, or naptha, a mixture of flammable hydrocarbon liquids usually produced from petroleum distillates or natural gas condensates used to make gasoline.

Red Rock's proposed refinery is expected to cost around $200 million. Construction is expected to begin this summer, with the first fuel being produced by 2016.

More:

Boston Firm Backs Lakeview's $200 Million Biomass Plan
Bizjournals.com (March 17)

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4. Europe Carbon Trade Would Gain Extra $1.1 Billion from Biomass

Bloomberg.com (March 16) - European carbon trading will probably bring in as much as an extra 1 billion euros ($1.1 billion) a year to combat climate change if wood-burning power stations are included in the system for limiting greenhouse-gas emissions.

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5. Blazing a Trail for Biomass Apprentices

Biomass Magazine.com (March 13) - Some of the leading players in the UK's biomass industry have joined forces to develop a skills standard under the British government's Apprenticeship Trailblazers program.

The program sees groups of employers pool their expertise to develop apprenticeship standards in their own sector with the aim of ensuring young people develop world-class skills to take into industry.

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VI. Urban Forestry

1. Ash Borers Take Bite Out of Leafy Canopy

THonline.com (March 16) - Daunted by the cost and difficulty of stopping the emerald ash borer, many cities are choosing to destroy their trees before the borer can. Chain saws are roaring in towns where up to 40 percent of the trees are ashes, and rows of stumps line streets once covered by a canopy of leaves.

About 50 million trees have been removed so far. With roughly 7 billion ash trees on public and private land in the United States, the job has only begun.

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2. Charlotte Officials Say Remove Tree Bands Now

Charlotteobserver.com (North Carolina, March 16) - The city of Charlotte is advising residents to remove the bands on willow oak trees now, rather than waiting until mid-April as had been previously recommended.

The bands are designed to prevent adult female cankerworms from climbing the trees to lay eggs. But last year the city discovered there is a new beetle in the area that feeds on cankerworms.

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3. Urban Trees Face "Survivor" Style Challenges

Journalstar.com (March 14) - Urban trees are taken away from their usual circumstances and placed in an unfamiliar and challenging environment. Recent studies have been undertaken with the hope that understanding that disparity and incorporating as much of their natural habitat as possible in this new environment might help muncipalities more successfully integrate trees into heavily populated areas.

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VII. Plants and Pests

1. This Cold Winter Is Too "Woolly" for Hemlock Pests

VermontPublicRadio.net (March 10) - Vermont is finally coming out of the deep freeze that it was in for pretty much all of February. Forty-three days below freezing in some parts of the state, with 5-degree averages in Montpelier and Rutland. There will be some casualties of the cold weather-but that's not necessarily a bad thing.

In fact, this winter's harsh weather is good news, at least temporarily, for those combating a pest that threatens Vermont's hemlock trees.

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2. The Bug That's Eating the Woods

National Geographic.com (April 2015 Issue) - Across western North America, in millions of acres of pine forest, the story is the same. Drive through parts of Colorado and you'll encounter entire mountainsides painted with rust. From valley bottoms all the way to the tree line, nearly every single pine has been killed by an enemy smaller than a thumbtack: the mountain pine beetle. Tour British Columbia, and the scale of destruction is even more appalling. More than 44 million acres of pine trees there, an area the size of Missouri, have been attacked to varying degrees over the past 15 years.

Nature is always changing. But the mountain pine beetle is a troubling omen. It shows that global warming can push even native species to go rogue. At some point the epidemic will run its course, leaving a wake of ghost forests and altered ecosystems.

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3. Emerald Ash Borer Now in 19 Iowa Counties

Newtondailynews.com (March 10) - For the purposes of some discussions, the emerald ash borer is a "boring" insect.

However, the growing number of Iowa counties affected by the beetle is not a "boring" topic to some people-especially those who realize how many Iowa ash trees could eventually become infested.

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VIII. Science and Research

1. Post-Fire Logging Can Reduce Fuels for Up to 40 Years

US Forest Service (March 11) - Harvesting fire-killed trees is an effective way to reduce woody fuels for up to four decades following wildfire in dry coniferous forests, a US Forest Service study has found.

The retrospective analysis, among the first to measure the long-term effects of post-fire logging on forest fuels, is published in the journal Forest Ecology and Managemen.

The study shows that post-fire logging also provides a tangible long-term fuel reduction benefit, giving forest managers another tool for managing woody fuels in dry forest landscapes.

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2. Cascades Study May Rewrite the Textbook on Forest Growth and Death

Oregon State University (March 17) - A century-long study in the Oregon Cascades may cause scientists to revise the textbook on how forests grow and die, accumulate biomass, and store carbon.

In a new analysis of forest succession in three Douglas-fir stands in the Willamette National Forest, two Oregon State University scientists report that biomass-a measure of tree volume-has been steadily accumulating for 150 years. In the long term, such a trend is not sustainable, they said, and if these stands behave in a manner similar to others in the Cascades, trees will begin to die from causes such as insect outbreaks, windstorms, or fire.

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3. Science Paper: First Guidebook for Ecosystem Services

Wildlife Conservation Society (March 12) - A team of investors, development organizations, conservationists, economists, and ecologists have published in the journal Science six natural science principles to ensure success of Payments for Ecosystem Services (PES), mechanisms that have helped preserve carbon stocks stored in Madagascar's rainforests, maintain wildlife populations important for tourism in Tanzania, and protect watersheds in France by working with local farmers.

This is the first time principles have been agreed upon for applying science to PES projects.

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IX. Items of Interest

1. Looking for Long-Term Benefits: North Carolina State Announces New Plans for the Hofmann Forest

TechnicianOnline.com (March 17) - North Carolina State University has announced a long-term plan that would leave most of the 79,000-acre Hofmann Forest intact, but would generate tens of millions of dollars for the university and the College of Natural Resources by selling deeds to timber companies for sustainable timber farming and selling working easements for use by the Department of Defense.

Note: NCSU Forestry Professor and SAF member Fred Cubbage quoted.

More:

New NCSU Plan Appears to Save Hofmann Forest Carolinacoastonline.com (March 17)

NCSU Reverses Field, Announces New Hofmann Forest Plan
WNCN.com (March 17)

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2. Yale Students Turn to Crowdfunding to Cover the Costs of Forestry Research

Alexandra Todorovic-Jones and Kyra Prats, two graduate students at Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, are planning a study on the susceptibility of oaks to climate change. The two women will focus specifically on two oak species (Quercus suber L. and Quercus leucotrichophora A. Camus). They plan to travel to see these two species in situ, in Spain and India. To do that, they are trying to raise $5,000 through a crowdfunding platform called Experiment, which seeks funds only for scientific research.

To read more, visit the International Oak Society website.

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3. "Living with Fire" Receives National Award

ElkoDaily.com (March 16) - When individuals from across the country who are involved in protecting homes and land from wildfires meet in Reno at the national Wildland Urban Interface Conference next week, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension's Living with Fire Program will be honored with a national Wildfire Mitigation Award for its leadership role in promoting fire adapted communities.

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X. SAF News

1. Gregory Award Scholarship Now Accepting Applications

The Gregory Award is a scholarship which helps bring students and young professionals from outside the US and Canada to the SAF Convention. Please help us get the word out about this great opportunity. See the SAF Convention website for more information. Applications are due May 1, 2015.

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2. SAF Forest Policy News

SAF Issues Press Release on New USFS Forest Inventory and Analysis Strategic Plan

From the release: A broad coalition of conservation, forest products, natural resources groups, and state agencies welcomes the US Department of Agriculture's release of the new strategic plan for the USDA Forest Service's (USFS) Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program. The Agricultural Act of 2014, also known as the Farm Bill, requires the USDA to submit an updated plan report to Congress.

The report provides lawmakers with information on funding needs to achieve the provisions for the FIA program as outlined in the 2014 Farm Bill. Its release is valuable to FIA stakeholders because it serves as a framework for understanding how the Forest Service envisions implementing the program and the funding levels necessary to do so.

To read the release in its entirety, visit the Forest Policy page on the SAF website and see the first item under "Featured Policy Items."

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3. Coming in the April 2015 Issue of Forest Science

Fundamental Research

Biometrics
Subject-Specific Prediction Using a Nonlinear Mixed Model: Consequences of Different Approaches
S. Sirkiä, J. Heinonen, J. Miina, and K. Eerikäinen

Evaluation of Methods for Calibrating a Tree Taper Equation
Q.V. Cao and J. Wang

Economics
Economic Optimization of Forest Biomass Processing and Transport in the Pacific Northwest USA
R. Zamora-Cristales, J. Sessions, K. Boston, and G. Murphy

Entomology & Pathology
A Comparison of Mountain Pine Beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) Productivity and Survival in Lodgepole and Whitebark Pine after a Region-Wide Cold Weather Event
E.M. Dooley, D.L. Six, and J.A. Powell

Forest Ecology
Range-Level Lodgepole Pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia Engelmann ex S. Watson) Understory Types in Western North America
W.L. Strong

Structural Diversity within Mature Forests in Northern Iran: A Case Study from a Relic Population of Persian Ironwood (Parrotia persica C.A. Meyer)
K. Sefidi, C.A. Copenheaver, M. Kakavand, and F.K. Behjou

Operations Research
A Chance-Constrained Programming Model to Allocate Wildfire Initial Attack Resources for a Fire Season
Y. Wei, M. Beavers, E. Belval, and B. Bird

Prediction of Forestry Planned End Products Using Dirichlet Regression and Neural Networks
C. Hickey, S. Kelly, P. Carroll, and J. O'Connor

Social Science
Categorizing the Social Context of the Wildland Urban Interface: Adaptive Capacity for Wildfire and Community "Archetypes"
T.B. Paveglio, C. Moseley, M.S. Carroll, D.R. Williams, E.J. Davis, and A.P. Fischer

Applied Research

Biometrics
Taper Equations for Pinus elliottii Engelm. in Soutehrn Paraná, Brazil
T. Schröder, E.A. Costa, A.F. Valério, and G.d.S. Lisboa

Modeling Tree Diameter Distributions in Natural Forests: An Evaluation of 10 Statistical Models
R.A. Ferreira de Lima, J.L.F. Batista, and P.I. Prado

Economics
Evaluating Timberland Investment Opportunities in the United States: A Real Options Analysis
B. Mei and M.L. Clutter

Timberland Ownerships and Reforestation in the Southern United States
X. Sun, D. Zhang, and B.J. Butler

Fire and Fuels Management
The Discriminatory Ability of Postfire Tree Mortality Logistic Regression Models
L.M. Ganio, T. Woolley, D.C. Shaw, and S.A. Fitzgerald

Forest Ecology
Density of Large Snags and Logs in Northern Arizona Mixed-Conifer and Ponderosa Pine Forests
J.L. Ganey, B.J. Bird, L.S. Baggett, and J.S. Jenness

Forest Management
Influence of Herbicides and Improvement Cutting, Fertilization, and Prescribed Fire on Planted Longleaf Pine Development
J.D. Haywood

Forest Carbon Offsets Revisited: Shedding Light on Darkwoods
G.C. van Kooten, T.N. Bogle, and F.P. de Vries

Harvesting & Utilization
Minnesota's Logging Businesses: An Assessment of the Health and Viability of the Sector
C.R. Blinn, T.J. O'Hara, D.T. Chura, and M.B. Russell

Policy
Implementation of the Forest Service Open Space Conservation Strategy in Washington State: Exploring the Role of the National Forest System
R.J. Pringle, L.K. Cerveny, and G.A. Bradley

Silviculture
Efficacy and Associated Factors of Even- and Uneven-Aged Management to Promote Oak Regeneration in the Missouri Ozarks
Z. Fan, Q. Yao, D. Dey, M. Spetich, A. Ezell, S. Shifley, J. Kabrick, and R. Jensen

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4. SAF State Society Meetings

New England Society of American Foresters 95th Annual Winter Meeting: Changing Silviculture in a Changing World
March 25-27
Lake Morey Resort in Fairlee, VT
For more information, visit the NESAF website.

Alaska SAF Annual Meeting
March 25-27
Pike¹s Waterfront Lodge, Fairbanks, AK
Contact: Jim Schwarber

Michigan State Society - Spring Conference
April 9-10, 2015
Marquette, MI
Click here for printable registration form

Agenda

Washington SAF-Washington Chapter of The Wildlife Society Joint Annual Meeting
April 15-17
Great Wolf Lodge, Grand Mound, WA
Contact: Peter Heide at (360) 791-8299

Oregon SAF-Oregon Chapter of The Wildlife Society Joint Annual Meeting
April 29-May 1
Eugene Hilton, Eugene, OR
Contact: Dale Claassen at (541) 954-6953, or Fran Cafferata Coe at (503) 680-7939

CO/WY SAF Joint Annual Meeting w/CTIA & CTFA
May 7-May 9, 2015 (Workshop and Business meetings only - May 7)
Glenwood Spring, CO

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5. 2015 SAF National Convention News

The 2015 SAF National Convention — Recreating Forestry — "The Confluence of Science, Society, and Technology" — will highlight a variety of contemporary forest resource management issues, including the trends, influences, and technologies that are facilitating the profession's progress toward the future.

The meeting will take place in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, where attendees will enjoy fabulous hospitality, the charm of Louisiana's capital city on the banks of the mighty Mississippi, and world-renowned cuisine alongside a scientific and technical program that provides an intrinsic opportunity for exploring the many links between the social, economic, and ecological considerations that form modern forest stewardship. Visit the SAF Convention website for full event details.

Abstract submission is now open for individual presentations and panels in the scientific and technical concurrent sessions or poster symposium. Submit Your Presentation or Poster.

New for 2015! The "Boots on the Ground" concurrent track is designed to present case studies and research that can help field foresters find solutions to management problems they face on a regular basis. Topics may include (but are not limited to):

  • Managing around oil and gas pipelines
  • The Clean Water Act
  • Tips for working more effectively with contractors and migrant workers
  • Wild pig management
  • How to work with local ordinances
  • Maintaining soil physical and chemical properties and organic matter
  • Procurement tips and tools
  • Logging and timber supply trends
  • New and emerging field technologies

New for 2015! The SAF Matters concurrent track is designed to provide a forum for members to discuss various issues, share best practices for State Society management, or learn about and promote ongoing and upcoming initiatives.

We encourage your submissions on these and other topics: Recreating Forestry through Science, Recreating Forestry through Society, Recreating Forestry through Technology, Recreating Forestry through Education and Outreach, Agroforestry, Consulting Forestry, Entomology & Pathology, Economics, Fire, Forest Ecology, Geospatial Technologies, History, International Forestry, Inventory & Biometrics, Policy, Recreation, Silviculture, Social Sciences, Soils & Hydrology, US Forest Service National Silviculture Workshop (NSW), Urban & Community Forestry, Utilization & Engineering, and Wildlife Management.

For more information on presenting see the SAF convention website. Click here to submit an abstract.

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6. SAF Member "Media Moments"

In addition to the SAF members quoted in some of the articles above, SAF members were also quoted in the following news items:

Quoted

  • Neill Forestry Consultants of Arkansas, owned by Scott Rowland, CF, was recently highlighted as the Magnolia-Columbia County Chamber of Commerce "Business of the Week."
  • Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources Forestry Team Leader and SAF member John Lubbers quoted in article on the dry conditions and risk of wildfire in the state.
  • USFS researcher and SAF member Brian Palik quoted in article on efforts to help northern MN forests ward off emerald ash borer.
  • US Forest Service researcher and SAF member David Nowak quoted in news item about the role trees can play in fighting air pollution.

Op-Eds

Michigan State University Extension Forester and SAF member Bill Cook authored, "Forest Evolution: Climate Change Is Certain to Create New Physical Environments for Forests," which appeared on the website OurMILand.com.

If you've had a media moment, be sure to tell us about it. Contact Joseph Smith with the details and a link to the article.

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About The E-Forester:

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