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April 17, 2015

 


For the latest forestry news, see the "Forestry News" section of the SAF homepage.

In This Issue ...

I. Featured News

1. Minnesota: Dayton, DNR Want More Money for State ForestsMinnesota: Dayton, DNR Want More Money for State Forests
2. Illinois: Tree-Clearing Turns Chicago Area's Forest Preserves into Prairie Preserves
3. Water News Roundup
4. Maine: Into the Woods: Brunswick-Topsham Land Trust Trains Citizen Foresters
5. Fire News Roundup

II. Federal Lands Management

1. Forestry Association OK with 'Threatened' Bat Status
2. Federal Review of Canada Lynx to Take Longer than Expected
3. Alaska's Yellow Cedar Considered for Endangered Species Protection
4. Land between the Lakes to Halt Timber Sales
5. Senate OKs County Timber Payments Extension

III. International Forestry News

1. Norway Funds Project to Monitor Forests
2. Australia: Eucalyptus Trees the Future for Forestry on the Tiwi Islands of the Northern Territory
3. Italy: Cull of Bacteria-Infected Olive Trees Begins in the South after EU Alarm, French Boycott

IV. Forest Products Industry

1. Boise Cascade Upgrades-Increases Capacity at Louisiana Plywood Mill
2. Oregon: Aerial Spraying Rules Stall in Salem
3. Tester Helps Secure $250,000 for SmartLam
4. Montana DNRC Working to Increase Wood Products Sales
5. Why Austria Has a Head Start in the Sustainable Timber Revolution

V. Biomass

1. Northeast Wood Products Begins Retrofit of Third Pellet Plant
2. USDA Awards Funds to Expand, Accelerate Wood Energy Markets
3. Cascades Unveils $26 Million Cellulosic Project in Quebec
4. Deal Forged on Minnesota Bioeconomy Legislation
5. Corn-Residue Removal vs. Erosion and Greenhouse Gases

VI. Urban Forestry

1. Nicole Cavender Talks Trees, in Time for Arbor Day
2. The Troublesome Connection between City Trees and Income Inequality
3. City Focuses on Planting as More Trees Lost to Emerald Ash Borer

VII. Plants and Pests

1. Push On to Fund Ash Treatment
2. New Mesoamerican Pine Beetle Described by Forest Service Scientist and Collaborators
3. Arizona Researchers: Fungus Could Be Key to Slowing Destructive Bark Beetles

VIII. Science and Research

1. FuturaGene's Eucalyptus Is Approved for Commercial Use in Brazil
2. NYC Startup Literally Helps You See the Forest through the Trees
3. Studies Question Wisdom of Thinning Forests to Stop Fires

IX. Items of Interest

1. At the OKC Bombing Memorial, the Survivor Tree Endures, Inspires
2. A Gorgeous Atlas of New York Tree Species
3. Honing of History: Rare and Sought-After Forestry Saws are Randle Man's Passion

X. SAF News

1. Op-Eds by SAF Members
2. SAF Forest Policy Activities
3. Opening for Vice-President and Board of Directors
4. SAF State Society Meetings
5. 2015 SAF National Convention News
6. SAF Welcomes New and Returning Members


I. Featured News

1. Minnesota: Dayton, DNR Want More Money for State Forests

Duluthnewstribune.com (April 15) - Minnesota Gov. Mark Dayton wants to spend more money on the state's forests to help bolster the struggling forest products industry and boost forest health in the face of invasive species and climate change.

This morning, Dayton's administration unveiled a proposal to add $2 million annually to the nearly $24 million annual budget of the Department of Natural Resources Forestry Division.

The DNR is characterizing the proposal as an effort to both improve forest health, increase species diversity, and make sure the state has enough trees to supply the beleaguered wood products industry that has shrunk dramatically over the past decade but which is still a major player in the Northland economy.

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2. Illinois: Tree-Clearing Turns Chicago Area's Forest Preserves into Prairie Preserves

Chicagotribune.com (April 14) - The buzz of chain saws filled Potawatomi Woods this winter as century-old trees cracked and fell to the ground. Contractors cleared 259 acres of mature ash, maples, and sycamores.

The project is part of a growing effort by conservationists in the Chicago area to cut down overcrowded woods into more open woodlands, savannas, and meadows. In some cases, forest preserves are being transformed into prairie preserves. It's also an indication that, despite their names, forest preserve districts in the Chicago area are spending a good deal of their resources felling trees.

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3. Water News Roundup

The following items appear in recognition of Water Week 2015. SAF is among the event's many partner organizations.

Oregon: Deschutes Land Trust Buys More Property on Whychus Creek

Bend Bulletin.com (April 15) - Deschutes Land Trust took another step forward in its goal to protect wildlife habitat along Whychus Creek northeast of Sisters.

The trust recently bought 58 acres of land, creating the new Aspen Hollow Preserve. It's on a half-mile stretch of Whychus Creek, between the Whychus Canyon Preserve and the Camp Polk Meadow Preserve.

In the fall, the trust plans to begin planting native seeds and opening the property for guided tours. Forestry work to relieve pressure on aspen groves from encroaching juniper and ponderosa pine probably will wait until next year.

McCollum Seeks Ban on New Mines in Much of Northeastern Minnesota

Minnpost.com (April 14) - A group of Minnesotans is taking on the mining of precious metals, and they have found an ally in the state's congressional delegation.

A group called the Campaign to Save the Boundary Waters is working to convince the Obama administration, and eventually Congress, to take steps to block the proposed Twin Metals project, and indeed any precious metal mining in a vast swatch around the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness.

Arkansas: How Might Forestry Be Impacted by Waterways of the US Rule?

DeltaFarmPress.com (April 13) - It isn't just row-crop agriculture that is fearful of the EPA's Waterways of the US (WOTUS) proposed rule. If implemented, the rule would also have a tremendous impact on forestry.

Joe Fox, director of the Arkansas Forestry Commission, recently spoke with Delta Farm Press.com about the state of the industry and his recent testimony on WOTUS before the House Agriculture Subcommittee on Conservation and Forestry.

Note: Note: Arkansas State Forester and SAF member Joe Fox, CF, is quoted in the article.

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4. Maine: Into the Woods: Brunswick-Topsham Land Trust Trains Citizen Foresters

Theforecaster.net (April 15) - Teachers, lawyers, a camp director, and a state forester braved the melting snow and thick mud last Saturday to set up an environmental science plot at Crystal Spring Farm.

The science workshop, hosted by the Brunswick-Topsham Land Trust, was held to teach educators and land trust volunteers how to set up a Forest Inventory Growth plot-a standardized forestry method for tracking things like the growth, biodiversity, and health of the woods.

The land trust hopes to use the plot to engage Brunswick high school students and residents in "citizen science" at its preserves.

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5. Fire News Roundup

Cold Brook Fire Increases to 5,500 Acres
Blackhillsfox.com (April 14)

Santa Ana Winds Prompt Red Flag Warning in LA, Ventura Counties
LAtimes.com (April 15)

Fires Starting Up Almost Daily across Minnesota and North Dakota
Inforum.com (April 14)

Nearly 2 Years after Hotshot Tragedy, New Account Emerges
Dcourier.com (April 9)

Apache 8 Documentary Explores Hardships of Female Wildland Firefighters
Ruidosonews.com (April 14)

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II. Federal Lands Management

1. Forestry Association OK with 'Threatened' Bat Status

SWTimes.com (April 13) - The Arkansas Forestry Association says it can live with a recent US Fish and Wildlife Service decision to list the northern long-eared bat as a threatened species, while allowing most forest management practices to continue unabated.

The US Fish and Wildlife Service had considered adding the bat to the endangered species list but settled instead on the "threatened" listing-offering the bats some protection from human harm-but also included a rule allowing the timber industry to continue most of its forest-management practices and timber harvesting.

Note: Arkansas State Forester and SAF member Joe Fox, CF, is quoted in the article.

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2. Federal Review of Canada Lynx to Take Longer than Expected

Rutlandherald.com (April 13) - The US Fish and Wildlife Service is applying a new threat assessment for federally protected Canada lynx from Maine to Washington State, delaying completion of the first five-year review.

The delayed five-year review is the first since Canada lynx were declared threatened in 2000. Designations of critical habitat have been made in parts of Maine, Wyoming, Washington, Montana, Idaho, and Minnesota.

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3. Alaska's Yellow Cedar Considered for Endangered Species Protection

Sitnews.us (April 11) - The US Fish and Wildlife Service has announced that Alaska yellow cedar trees may warrant protection under the Endangered Species Act because of ongoing threats from climate change and logging.

If listed, yellow cedar would be the first Alaska tree species, and only the second plant in the state, protected by the Endangered Species Act.

Note: SAF member Owen Graham, CF, quoted in the article.

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4. Land between the Lakes to Halt Timber Sales

Leaf-Chronicle.com (Kentucky, April 12) - The US Forest Service is halting new timber sales projects at Land Between the Lakes National Recreation Area after several months of public outcry.

The Murray Ledger & Times reports local leaders have been lobbying the Forest Service to focus on preserving the area's old-growth hardwood forests and to stop logging and burning hundreds of acres to create oak grasslands.

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5. Senate OKs County Timber Payments Extension

KTVZ.com (April 14) - Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR), praised the Senate's move to extend a lifeline to rural Oregon communities with final passage of a two-year renewal of the Secure Rural Schools program.

Wyden authored the original Secure Rural Schools program in 2000 with then-Sen. Larry Craig (R-ID). Since then, it has brought more than $2.8 billion to rural Oregon counties. Wyden and Sen. Mike Crapo (R-ID) introduced a three-year extension of the county payments program last month.

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III. International Forestry News

1. Norway Funds Project to Monitor Forests

PraugePost.com (April 15) - Norway and the UN Food and Agriculture Organization have signed a 35 million NOK (about $4.5 million USD) agreement to improve the capacity of developing countries to monitor and report on their forest resources, and changes in forest area.

The project will facilitate countries' access to earth observation data sources, including satellite imagery, and develop an easy-to-use platform for processing and interpreting this data.

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2. Australia: Eucalyptus Trees the Future for Forestry on the Tiwi Islands of the Northern Territory

Abc.net.au (April 13) - As the traditional owners of the Tiwi Islands gear up for their first woodchip harvest of Acacia mangium trees, there are nearby trials showing what the future of what Tiwi forestry will look like.

A variety of eucalyptus trees are showing significant growing advantages to the acacias that currently dot the landscape of Melville Island.

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3. Italy: Cull of Bacteria-Infected Olive Trees Begins in the South after EU Alarm, French Boycott

Greenfieldreporter.com (April 13) - Forestry officials in southern Italy have cut down the first of thousands of olive trees infected with deadly bacteria in a controversial bid to prevent its spread.

The Xylella fastidiosa bacteria has ravaged olive trees in the Puglia region and contributed to a 35 percent drop in the region's olive oil production last year. Its spread has so alarmed the European Union that France announced a boycott of Puglian vegetables.

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IV. Forest Products Industry

1. Boise Cascade Upgrades-Increases Capacity at Louisiana Plywood Mill

Areadevelopment.com (April 10) - Boise Cascade will make a $43 million capital investment to upgrade and increase capacity at its plywood mill in Florien, Louisiana.

The Florien mill is one of three major manufacturing sites Boise Cascade operates in the state. Other locations include a plywood mill in Oakdale and an engineered wood products mill in Alexandria. The expansion is scheduled to begin this summer.

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2. Oregon: Aerial Spraying Rules Stall in Salem

Registerguard.com (April 12) - Environmental advocates and some rural Oregonians appear likely to come up empty in their effort to get major new state restrictions on aerial herbicide spraying.

After several weeks of behind-the-scenes haggling, the Register-Guard reported that lawmakers won't back the creation of "no-spray" buffer zones around homes and schools; won't force the timber industry to report the specific pesticides it is spraying; and won't create an improved spray-notification system for neighbors.

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3. Tester Helps Secure $250,000 for SmartLam

DailyInterlake.com (April 14) - US Sen. Jon Tester (D-MT), helped secure a $250,000 grant from the US Department of Agriculture for SmartLam, a cross-laminated timber manufacturer and distributor in Columbia Falls.

In January, Tester wrote a letter of support for SmartLam's Wood Innovations Planning Grant application. The grant was announced last week.

Wood Innovations grants are awarded to companies that use wood products as a renewable energy source and as a building material. The money is designed to increase the use of wildfire fuel from public lands to promote forest health and create jobs.

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4. Montana DNRC Working to Increase Wood Products Sales

GreatFallsTribune.com (April 13) - The Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation has been awarded a $240,000 grant to promote the use of Montana wood products in construction. The DNRC was one of 43 organizations to receive a Wood Innovations grant from the US Department of Agriculture as part of that agency's effort to support new market opportunities for wood energy and innovative wood building materials

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5. Why Austria Has a Head Start in the Sustainable Timber Revolution

Thefifthestate.com.au (April 14) - Developers in Vienna are about to start construction on what they say will be the world's tallest timber commercial building, the 24-story HoHo Vienna. The 84-meter hybrid-construction tower will use similar engineered timber materials to those imported from Austria by Lend Lease for the construction of Forté and Docklands library, both in Melbourne.

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V. Biomass

1. Northeast Wood Products Begins Retrofit of Third Pellet Plant

Biomass Magazine.com (April 14) - Northeast Wood Products has begun retrofitting its third pellet manufacturing plant, a Jasper, Tennessee, facility that will be capable of producing up to 125,000 tons of pellets annually.

More:

Tribe to Convert Abandoned Ethanol Plant into Wood Pellet Production Facility
TimesFreePress.com (April 15)

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2. USDA Awards Funds to Expand, Accelerate Wood Energy Markets

Biomass Magazine.com (April 9) - On April 9, Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced the award of more than $9 million to expand and accelerate wood energy and other wood product markets. The federal funds will leverage $22 million in investments from partners, resulting in a total investment of $31 million in 23 states.

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3. Cascades Unveils $26 Million Cellulosic Project in Quebec

Biofuels Digest.com (April 13) - In Quebec, Cascades Inc. announced the company's investment in a new technology at its Norampac-Cabano facility. The process is used to extract hemicellulose, a cellulosic sugar with high value-added potential, from wood chips.

The extraction of hemicellulose will replace the use of chemical products, which would otherwise have to be purchased, shipped, and disposed of responsibly. Another benefit is the plant's reduced energy consumption, which will boost Cabano's competitiveness.

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4. Deal Forged on Minnesota Bioeconomy Legislation

Biomass Magazine.com (April 10) - Biobased industry, agriculture, and environmental interests recently reached agreement on legislation that would create production-based incentives for renewable chemicals, advanced biofuels, and biomass thermal energy, and the groups are urging the Minnesota legislature to pass the legislation, as amended.

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5. Corn-Residue Removal vs. Erosion and Greenhouse Gases

Agriview.com (April 15) - Farmers who are considering selling corn residue from their fields to produce cellulosic ethanol first should weigh a range of site-specific factors to their operations, according to new research from an Iowa State University professor.

Mahdi Al-Kaisi, a professor of agronomy, is urging farmers to take a thoughtful approach that accounts for variables such as topography, tillage system, nitrogen application, and the amount of organic matter present in their soil to determine how much corn residue they should part with.

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VI. Urban Forestry

1. Nicole Cavender Talks Trees, in Time for Arbor Day

ChicagoTribune.com (April 14) - For many Chicagoans, the Morton Arboretum in Lisle is a green oasis, its canopied trails beckoning visitors for decades. But for Nicole Cavender, Morton's vice president of science and conservation, the 1,700-acre arboretum is much more than a wondrous place to visit. As manager of its new Center for Tree Science, her mission is oak-tree mighty: to unite a global lineup of experts from diverse fields and learn how trees can survive in our increasingly urban environments.

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2. The Troublesome Connection between City Trees and Income Inequality

Citylab.com (April 9) - By now, researchers have well established the benefits of trees in urban neighborhoods. Trees are correlated with better health outcomes. They mitigate the urban heat-island effect and lower energy bills. They raise overall property values.

But how trees and their benefits are distributed across neighborhoods is a complicated picture. A new study published in PLOS ONE offers a provocative look across several US cities at what neighborhoods are most likely to have urban tree canopy cover. Money may not grow on trees, the authors write, but in a way, trees grow on money.

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3. City Focuses on Planting as More Trees Lost to Emerald Ash Borer

ChicagoSunTimes.com (April 12) - The arrival of spring marks the start of forestry officials' yearly battle against the destructive emerald ash borer, an invasive species of beetle that could eventually claim all ash trees.

In the years since the beetle was found in Illinois, the city has spent considerable resources treating trees for the infestation-while the county forest preserves and the Chicago Botanic Garden have focused more on tree removal.

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VII. Plants and Pests

1. Push On to Fund Ash Treatment

LaCrosseTribune.com (Wisconsin, April 9) - The La Crosse Community Foundation, a coalition of community groups, has stepped forward with a fundraising effort to treat some of the area's trees against the emerald ash borer and help provide replacements for ash deemed too damaged to save.

The foundation has offered a $5,000 grant to inject select trees with an insecticide against the borer. It's considered the most effective way to protect ash against the insect larvae that otherwise would burrow under the bark and kill the tree.

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2. New Mesoamerican Pine Beetle Described by Forest Service Scientist and Collaborators

US Forest Service (April 14) - A newly discovered species of tree-killing bark beetle, Dendroctonus mesoamericanus sp. nov. has been described in a paper just published online in the Annals of the Entomological Society of America.

Numerous and diverse studies by a research team that includes members from the United States, Mexico, and Norway determined the organism to be a species new to science, and provided information needed to manage the insect, which may share responsibility with the southern pine beetle for the catastrophic damage to pines of Central America in recent years.

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3. Arizona Researchers: Fungus Could Be Key to Slowing Destructive Bark Beetles

KJZZ.org (April 15) - Growing bark beetle populations have decimated forests in the western United States, with some damage to northern and eastern Arizona forests. But local research is getting closer to a "solution" that may help.

In the Arizona ponderosa pines, academic, industry and government researchers are teaming up to combat bark beetles. Rich Hofstetter, a Northern Arizona University forestry researcher, said the trees may be hardy, to a point.

Note: Hofstetter is a member of SAF.

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VIII. Science and Research

1. FuturaGene's Eucalyptus Is Approved for Commercial Use in Brazil

EINNews.com (April 10) - The Brazilian National Technical Commission on Biosafety (CTNBio) has approved the commercial use of the yield-enhanced eucalyptus developed by FuturaGene, a subsidiary of Suzano Pulp and Paper. Field experiments conducted since 2006 at various locations in Brazil have demonstrated an approximate 20 percent increase in yield compared to its equivalent conventional variety.

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2. NYC Startup Literally Helps You See the Forest through the Trees

Alleywatch.com (April 2015) - Nearly a third of our planet is covered by forest, and considering all of the resources in those wooded areas, there's no doubt you're looking at a lucrative market, and someone should be keeping an eye-and a few drones or satellites-on it.

One company, Intelescope Solutions, is doing just that.

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3. Studies Question Wisdom of Thinning Forests to Stop Fires

Santafenewmexican.com (April 13) - New studies question how and where fire and tree thinning in western forests should be used to restore forest health and protect watersheds. The studies, and the move toward treating forests across large landscapes, are fueling some old debates over the best way for people to manage forests that have been dramatically altered during decades of fire suppression, logging, and overgrazing.

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IX. Items of Interest

1. At the OKC Bombing Memorial, the Survivor Tree Endures, Inspires

Tulsaworld.com (April 13) - The Survivor Tree at the Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum, was once a scrawny, solitary parking-lot tree whose roots were paved over when the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building complex was completed in 1977. Then on April 19, 1995, the tree survived the explosion of a 4,000-pound bomb that destroyed the building and killed 168 people.

The tree was almost cut down to recover valuable shards of evidence lodged in its trunk and limbs. But as a strong-willed, shaken city began the process of recovery, a group of people decided that could never happen.

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2. A Gorgeous Atlas of New York Tree Species

Citylab.com (April 14) - Though New York can sometimes seem like a drab warren of chain-link fence and oily pavement, the city actually has an impressive number of trees. On the streets alone-not counting private properties and parks-there were 592,130 at last reckoning, a leafy explosion you can now peruse in this great visualization of tree species.

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3. Honing of History: Rare and Sought-After Forestry Saws are Randle Man's Passion

Chronicle.com (April 9) - From inside of a small shop, John Starling sharpens and repairs, collects and sells antique logging saws used by trail crews around the United States. Because mechanized tools aren't allowed in wilderness areas, crews rely on the same kind of saws used before the advent of the chain saw.

Although manufacturers are still producing handsaws, antique saws-those at least 40 years old-are highly sought after by professionals because of the superior metals they're made from.

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X. SAF News

1. Op-Eds by SAF Members

"Western Tidewater's Forest Sustainability by the Numbers"
By Neil Clark

Tidewaters News.com (April 11) - As current chair of the Virginia Division of the Society of American Foresters, a board member of the Virginia Forestry Association and an educator on forest management and sustainability for eastern Virginia, I felt the need to provide a bit of additional information and clarification to the April 4 Tidewater News article titled "Is the wood product industry sustainable in Western Tidewater?"

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2. SAF Forest Policy Activities

SAF's Assistant Director of Government Affairs and External Relations Danielle Watson testified (via phone) to the Vermont House Committee on Government Operations in support of H. 355, a bill that would require foresters to be licensed to practice in the State and includes aspects of the Certified Forester program. Charlie Hancock, past chair of the Green Mountain Division, also testified in support. A number of opportunities were identified to improve and strengthen the bill, and the Committee seems very amicable to these ideas. We look forward to continued collaboration on this legislation.

Watson also participated in a Department of Interior listening session regarding implementation of Secretarial Order 3336, Rangeland Fire Prevention, Management and Restoration. The agency is seeking comments on a final draft report, which outlines strategies for increasing capacity, vegetation management, and other restoration plans. The final report (set to be delivered to Secretary Jewell on May 1) will frame a long-term strategy for addressing the threat of rangeland fire in the Great Basin region.

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3. Opening for Vice-President and Board of Directors

The Society of American Foresters is now accepting candidates for vice-president and board of directors.

Note the following dates:

  • June 1: Candidate materials for the office of vice-president and three directors are due.
  • October 1: Ballots to elect a vice-president and directors are distributed to voting members via email. Members without an email address will receive a paper ballot.
  • November 1: Ballots postmarked by this date will be counted. Ballots post marked after this date will not be counted.
  • Mid-November: Election results are verified and announced.

Procedure
On November 1, 2015 a vice-president and three directors representing voting districts 3, 6, and 9 will be elected for three-year terms beginning January 1, 2016. The vice-president will hold that office for one year, then serve one year as president, and one year on the Board as immediate past-president. Election to the Board is by district.

Board Eligibility
Elected directors shall be current, professional members and elected for three-year terms. They shall not serve consecutive terms nor be elected for more than two terms.

Board Responsibilities
The Board of Directors provides leadership and direction to the Society to ensure the achievement of its mission. Directors are responsible to SAF members for: fiduciary matters including monitoring and approving the management of the funds and properties of the SAF; assuring the development of appropriate plans for the organization; establishing SAF's direction and monitoring its implementation; reviewing national office programs as they relate to SAF's mission; developing with staff input appropriate governance policies and direction to the CEO to achieve the mission of the SAF; serving as a communication link from the Board to the members; reviewing, accepting, remanding, or approving reports of Board-appointed committees and task forces, the Forest Science & Technology Board, and House of Society Delegates; reviewing and ensuring compliance of relevant laws; ensuring that SAF, at all levels, operates in compliance with antitrust laws as stated in the SAF Antitrust Policy.

Instructions and Forms for Board of Directors and Vice-Presidential Candidates are posted on the SAF website.

For more information, contact Patricia Adadevoh, Leadership Services Manager, Society of American Foresters, 5400 Grosvenor Lane, Bethesda, MD 20814-2198; (866) 897-8720, ext. 123.

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4. SAF State Society Meetings

Oregon SAF-Oregon Chapter of The Wildlife Society Joint Annual Meeting
April 29-May 1
Eugene Hilton, Eugene, OR
Contact: Dale Claassen at (541) 954-6953, or Fran Cafferata Coe at (503) 680-7939

CO/WY SAF Joint Annual Meeting w/CTIA & CTFA
May 7-May 9, 2015 (Workshop and Business meetings only - May 7)
Glenwood Spring, CO

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5. 2015 SAF National Convention News

The 2015 SAF National Convention — Recreating Forestry — "The Confluence of Science, Society, and Technology" — will highlight a variety of contemporary forest resource management issues, including the trends, influences, and technologies that are facilitating the profession's progress toward the future.

The meeting will take place in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, where attendees will enjoy fabulous hospitality, the charm of Louisiana's capital city on the banks of the mighty Mississippi, and world-renowned cuisine alongside a scientific and technical program that provides an intrinsic opportunity for exploring the many links between the social, economic, and ecological considerations that form modern forest stewardship. Visit the SAF Convention website for full event details.

Abstract submission is now open for individual presentations and panels in the scientific and technical concurrent sessions or poster symposium. Submit Your Presentation or Poster.

New for 2015! The "Boots on the Ground" concurrent track is designed to present case studies and research that can help field foresters find solutions to management problems they face on a regular basis. Topics may include (but are not limited to):

  • Managing around oil and gas pipelines
  • The Clean Water Act
  • Tips for working more effectively with contractors and migrant workers
  • Wild pig management
  • How to work with local ordinances
  • Maintaining soil physical and chemical properties and organic matter
  • Procurement tips and tools
  • Logging and timber supply trends
  • New and emerging field technologies

New for 2015! The SAF Matters concurrent track is designed to provide a forum for members to discuss various issues, share best practices for State Society management, or learn about and promote ongoing and upcoming initiatives.

We encourage your submissions on these and other topics: Recreating Forestry through Science, Recreating Forestry through Society, Recreating Forestry through Technology, Recreating Forestry through Education and Outreach, Agroforestry, Consulting Forestry, Entomology & Pathology, Economics, Fire, Forest Ecology, Geospatial Technologies, History, International Forestry, Inventory & Biometrics, Policy, Recreation, Silviculture, Social Sciences, Soils & Hydrology, US Forest Service National Silviculture Workshop (NSW), Urban & Community Forestry, Utilization & Engineering, and Wildlife Management.

For more information on presenting see the SAF convention website. Click here to submit an abstract.

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6. SAF Welcomes New and Returning Members

Welcome to SAF!

Haley Anderson, WA
Austin Ashby, CA
Joshua Badding, NY
Amanda Brenner, CO
Patrick Briggs, PA
Samuel Carpenter, NV
Landon Charlo, WA
James Church, VA
Livia Cipriano Almeida Barros, OR
Jane Cleary, VA
Christopher Cohrs, NC
Shadia Duery, OR
Janey Ellsworth, PA
Sarah Elyard, PA
Garrett Evans, IN
Sean Foote, ME
Jodi Forrester, WI
Josh Fiend, OR
Thomas Conner Fristoe, AR
Kyle Gill, MN
Nabin Gyawali, NC
Devin Hansen, NY
Christopher Henkel, MN
Eric Horntvedt, NV
Casey Jennings, ME
Patrick Jernigan, TX
Matthew Johnson, NV
Paymon Kaeni, NV
Chase Kane, VA
Trevor Kubitskey, MI
Cale Lopez, NV
James Lutz, UT
Stacey Mack, NY
Alicia Magedman, OR
Josefina Narvaja, WA
Joshua Obermeyer, AR
Richard Palermo, VA
Anna Rose Peterson, OR
Callan Pope, TX
Daniel Rush, LA
Shannon Shy, WV

Carson Standifer, NV
Guy Stivers, VA
Brittany Taylor, NV
Denise Vance, WA
John Vance, WV
Sara Vial, VA
Zachery Welch, NV
Ross Wygmans, FL
Benjamin Young, OH

Welcome back to SAF!

Greg Deyoe, WA
Glen Holt, AK
Claralynn Nunamaker, FL

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