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June 26, 2015

(Please Note: The E-Forester will be on vacation the week of July 3.)
Also, special thanks to Steve Wilent for his assistance with this week's issue

2015 SAF National Convention Registration in Now Open!
Join us in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, November 3-7 and be part of the discussion on the trends, influences, and technologies that are shaping the profession in the 21st century!

 


For the latest forestry news, see the "Forestry News" section of the SAF homepage.

In This Issue ...

I. Featured News

1. California: State Adopts Emergency Regulation for Removing Dead and Dying Trees
2. New Mexico: $3.5 Million from Public Works Bill Will Go to Watersheds
3. Maine: 224 Businesses Come Out against Katahdin-Region National Park
4. Virginia Tech Professor Helps Develop New Landscape Sustainability Ratings
5. Wildland Fire News

II. Federal Lands Management

1. 4FRI Contractor Struggles with Lack of Trucks, Money
2. Debate over the Future of Mark Twain National Forest
3. BLM Seeking Comments on Timber near California Border
4. Congress Blocks Sage Grouse Listing
5. Spike in "Wild"-Inspired Adventures Prompts Restrictions

III. International Forestry News

1. UK: New Guidance Promotes Sustainable Timber Use
2. Nigeria: Expert Says Forests Contribute to Livelihood of 1.6 Billion People
3. Canada: AG Concerned about Private Wood Supply and Forest Marketing Boards

IV. Forest Products Industry

1. Great Recession Hit Peninsula Harder than Spotted Owl Restrictions
2. Mill Jammed with Logs
3. Beetle Plague Spurs Canadians on US Lumber-Mill Buying Spree
4. Plum Creek Revises Development Plan
5. Logging Business Booming in Halifax County, Virginia

V. Biomass

1. Greenfield Approves First Local Anti-Biomass Ordinance in Massachusetts
2. Tennessee Awards $250,000 Grant to Waste-to-Energy Project
3. Enviva Inflates First Pellet Storage Dome at North Carolina Port
4. Converting Drax to Burn Biomass Required New Supply Chain
5. New UK Port Facility to Provide Pellets to Drax

VI. Urban Forestry

1. Louisville Tree Advisory Commission Disbands, Recommends Ordinance
2. City of Knoxville Releases First Urban Forestry Progress Report
3. Ash Tree Removal Begins in Kingston, Ontario

VII. Plants and Pests

1. Destructive Southern Pine Beetle Strikes Northeast
2. Gypsy Moths Back with a Vengeance: Counties Caught Off Guard
3. Ash Borer on the Move in Maryland, Iowa

VIII. Science and Research

1. Tiny Northwest Fly Could Save East Coast Hemlock Forests, Researchers Say
2. To Aid Conservation, Loggers, Landowners Asked to "Think Like a Bird"
3. High-Tech Tools Help Wildland Firefighters

IX. Items of Interest

1. Biologists: Snake Pathogen Is "Eerily Similar" to White-Nose Syndrome
2. Chuck Leavell Quotes Aldo Leopold, Grows Trees in Georgia
3. Selkirk College Forest Technology Students Shift to Mountain Classroom

X. SAF News

1. SAF Media Moments
2. Journal of Forestry Call for Papers: Tribal Forest Management and Research You May Be Missing
3. Apply Now for 2015 Ben Meadows and SAF Diversity Scholarships
4. 2015 SAF National Convention News
5. SAF Store Sale Item of the Week: Insignia Belt Buckle


I. Featured News

1. California: State Adopts Emergency Regulation for Removing Dead and Dying Trees

SantaCruzsentinel.com (June 23) - With a historic drought and wildfire season in full swing and eight blazes currently being battled in the state, the California Board of Forestry and Fire Protection has adopted an emergency regulation for removal of dead and dying trees.

The emergency regulation will allow individual landowners or professional foresters to apply for an exemption to cut dead and dying trees of any size without the typical timber harvest plan, submission requirements, and completion and stocking report requirements.

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2. New Mexico: $3.5 Million from Public Works Bill Will Go to Watersheds

SantaFenewmexican.com (June 22) - Gov. Susana Martinez touted the fact that $3.5 million from the recently signed capital projects spending package is earmarked for restoring watershed areas on public lands around the state of New Mexico.

The funding will be used to treat about 7,700 acres of high-priority watershed areas on public lands, which Martinez said were identified in the New Mexico Forest Action Plan.

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3. Maine: 224 Businesses Come Out against Katahdin-Region National Park

BangorDailyNews.com (June 18) - Opponents of a proposed 150,000-acre national park and recreation area east of Baxter State Park recently held a rally, during which they presented a list of 224 businesses directly employing more than 3,900 people that don't want to see the plan realized.

Possibly the strongest single display of opposition to the proposal since the call for a park in 2012, the businesses include some of the biggest logging, papermaking, forestry, land management, and trucking companies in the state.

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4. Virginia Tech Professor Helps Develop New Landscape Sustainability Ratings

Roanoke.com (June 19) - A new national rating and certification system for sustainable landscapes has been established under the auspices of the US Green Building Council, and a Virginia Tech urban forestry professor helped develop it.

Susan Day, who specializes in tree root and soil health in urban environments and teaches forestry and horticulture, served on a committee that has worked since 2007 to develop guidelines for sustainable soil management for landscapes.

Note: Day is a member of SAF.

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5. Wildland Fire News

Wildfires Prompt Evacuations in Alaska, Road Closures in California
Jamestownsun.com (June 23)

Hundreds of Firefighters Battle Blaze South of Lake Tahoe
ABC7News.com

Forestry Servicemen Explain Aerial Firefighting
Frontiersman.com (June 22)

Dozens of Wildfires Ignite across Northeast Florida
Firstcoastnews.com (June 24)

US Forest Service Gets More Air Tankers to Fight Wildfires
KTVB.com (June 23)

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II. Federal Lands Management

1. 4FRI Contractor Struggles with Lack of Trucks, Money

Paysonroundup.com (June 23) - Debate continues to swirl around the slow progress in the largest forest restoration effort in US history.

Good Earth Power AZ landed a 10-year contract to thin 300,000 acres of overgrown Arizona forests two years ago, but so far has thinned only a fraction of the anticipated acreage.

More:

Making a Forest Ready for 4FRI
AZdailysun.com (June 23)

Thinning, Prescribed Burn Projects Planned for Northern Arizona Forests
KJZZ.org (June 23)

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2. Debate over the Future of Mark Twain National Forest

Lakeexpo.com (June 22) - The US Forest Service has proposed returning 18,000 acres in the Mark Twain National Forest's Cassville unit to pre-settlement conditions, a time when the forest was much more open and trees were spaced much farther apart, thinned by occasional fires, compared with the denser stands of timber in the area today.

The plan has angered some forest users, but it hasn't pitted conservationists and environmentalists against public land managers. In fact, the project has the backing of several national groups, including the Nature Conservancy, the American Bird Conservancy, and the National Wild Turkey Federation.

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3. BLM Seeking Comments on Timber near California Border

Heraldandnews.com (June 23) - The Bureau of Land Management's Klamath Falls Field Office is planning a vegetation treatment project in the southwestern portion of the Klamath Falls Resource Area just north of the California border.

According to a news release, the proposed treatments include commercial thinning, pre-commercial thinning, brush mowing, and hazardous fuel treatments of approximately 1,450 acres within the larger project area.

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4. Congress Blocks Sage Grouse Listing

Craigdailypress.com (June 24) - In December, Congress passed a federal spending bill containing a provision that prohibits the US Fish and Wildlife Service from issuing any listing rules related to the greater sage grouse.

The provision is one of several moves made by legislators in what has become something of a chess match between Congress, federal agencies, state governments, and local agencies intertwined in the bird's fate.

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5. Spike in "Wild"-Inspired Adventures Prompts Restrictions

Bendbulletin.com (June 24) - Build a trail from Mexico to Canada, and a trickle of hardy souls will see if they can cover it, pushing through parched desert, driving rain and sky-high fields of snow. Let Hollywood glamorize the trail a half-century later and the masses will arrive, prepared or not.

In its nearly 50 years of spanning the Sierras and Cascades border to border, the Pacific Crest Trail has seen nothing matching the onslaught of hikers measuring themselves against the 2,650-mile route this year. For the first time, the US Forest Service has restricted, to 50 per day, the number of "thru-hikers" embarking from the trail's southernmost point in Campo, California.

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III. International Forestry News

1. UK: New Guidance Promotes Sustainable Timber Use

NCE.co.uk (June 22) - New guidance on the use of tropical hardwoods in marine and freshwater construction aims to encourage the specification of more sustainable species.

In a bid to encourage the specification of lesser used species, the Timber Research and Development Association has published a new Wood Information Sheet "Specifying timber species in marine and freshwater construction," which gives details of 18 alternative, more sustainable species of tropical hardwoods tested by the environment agency in a three-year research program.

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2. Nigeria: Expert Says Forests Contribute to Livelihood of 1.6 Billion People

BusinessDayOnline.com (June 24) - Morenike Ojo, provost of the Federal College of Forestry, in Ibadan, says forests provide home to no fewer than 300 million people and contribute to the livelihood of 1.6 billion people worldwide, noting that the products and services the forests provide are essential to every aspect of life.

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3. Canada: AG Concerned about Private Wood Supply and Forest Marketing Boards

Atlanticfarmfocus.ca (June 24) - Auditor General Kim MacPherson is concerned about the respective roles of the Department of Natural Resources and the New Brunswick Forest Products Commission in their oversight of the province's private wood supply.

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IV. Forest Products Industry

1. Great Recession Hit Peninsula Harder than Spotted Owl Restrictions

PeninsulaDailyNews.com (June 22) - Twenty-five years of economic data for Washington's Olympic Peninsula show that its residents do, in fact, have something to fear: Wall Street bankers. Beginning in 2009, the region lost jobs for six straight years, jobs data show. Nearly 13,000 jobs in the four counties evaporated. By comparison, the Olympic Peninsula lost 2,450 jobs in 1991, the year after the northern spotted owl was declared a threatened species, though not all of those job losses were caused by its listing.

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2. Mill Jammed with Logs

RecorderOnline.com (June 23) - After struggling for the past several years to come up with enough logs to mill, Sierra Forest Products in Terra Bella, California has an abundance of logs. The only lumber mill in the southern half of the state and one of only seven mills remaining in California, Sierra Forest Products has so many logs it is not too anxious to acquire more.

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3. Beetle Plague Spurs Canadians on US Lumber-Mill Buying Spree

Bloomberg.com (June 23) - In the 60 years since Bob Jordan III joined his family's North Carolina sawmill business, he hasn't seen anything quite like the Canadian invasion of the South's lumber industry.

Western Canadian lumber producers have good reason to be looking to the southeast corner of the continent. Chased from their home forests by rising costs and a plague of tree-killing beetles, West Fraser Timber Co., Canfor Corp., and Interfor Corp. have been on a buying spree, doubling the number of mills they own in the South since 2009 to about 34.

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4. Plum Creek Revises Development Plan

Gainesville.com (June 22) - Plum Creek Timber Co. recently unveiled a scaled-back plan that drops two areas in the Envision Alachua development that the timber giant had hoped to build in Alachua County, Florida, and adds more land to a buffer strip that runs through the remaining areas.

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5. Logging Business Booming in Halifax County, Virginia

Godanriver.com (June 22) - According to Kenneth Hodges, owner of H & M Logging, and his son, Kevin, who owns Ke'Jaeh Logging, the logging industry in Virginia is alive and well.

Although the logging business has been good to the Hodges family, logging prices for oak and hardwood currently are down. Pine lumber prices also have been down since 2009.

However, boosting the Virginia hardwood market recently has been the pipeline expansion with Dominion Power and pipeline companies buying many large wooden mats.

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V. Biomass

1. Greenfield Approves First Local Anti-Biomass Ordinance in Massachusetts

MassLive.com (June 23) - Greenfield, Massachusetts, is the first community in the state to strictly regulate biomass power plants. A new ordinance prohibits industrial-scale wood-burning plants as well as trash-to-energy plants, but allows anaerobic digesters and residential wood stoves. Smaller commercial wood-burning facilities would be allowed, as long as they burn only clean wood, wood pellets, and chips. No facility will be permitted to burn garbage, tires, construction materials, plastics, or other materials.

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2. Tennessee Awards $250,000 Grant to Waste-to-Energy Project

Biomass Magazine.com (June 23) - A $250,000 matching funds grant has been awarded to the city of Lebanon, Tennessee, to assist with construction of a new waste-to-energy facility that will reduce landfill usage and provide clean electrical power. The funding comes from the Clean Tennessee Energy Grant program administered by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation.

The biomass gasification plant can convert as much as 64 tons per day of wood waste, sewer sludge, and used tires to electricity for use at Lebanon's wastewater treatment plant.

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3. Enviva Inflates First Pellet Storage Dome at North Carolina Port

Biomass Magazine.com (June 22) - Wood pellet exporter Enviva recently inflated the first of two 170-foot pellet storage domes in Wilmington, North Carolina, for shipment to Europe. The heavy polyvinyl chloride (PVC) material, which gives the dome its shape, is like a balloon on top of a 175-feet-in-diameter concrete pad. The dome has a capacity of 45,000 metric tons of pellets.

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4. Converting Drax to Burn Biomass Required New Supply Chain

WBHL.com (June 16) - We Energies is getting some heat for not using its new biomass power plant near Wausau as much as it expected.

Supplymanagement.com (June 22) - Graham Backhouse, head of supply chain and logistics at Drax, the UK's largest power station, said it was necessary to create new port facilities, new rail wagons, and extra storage facilities. In 2008, the station used a couple of hundred thousand tons of biomass-a mixture of timber and agricultural by-products-but by 2010 it was burning more than one million tons a year. Two of the plant's boilers are burning purely biomass and the company plans to convert a third boiler to biomass this year.

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5. New UK Port Facility to Provide Pellets to Drax

BiomassMagazine.com (June 23) - UK-based Peel Ports Group recently announced plans to build a new £100 million ($158.29 million) biomass terminal at the Port of Liverpool. The facility, which will have the capacity to handle up to 3 million metric tons of wood pellets per year, will supply pellets via rail to a Drax power station in Selby. When fully operational, the terminal is expected to have the ability to facilitate up to 10 train loads of pellets per day and will account for up to 40 percent of the total wood pellets consumed by Drax each year. In addition to rail loading capability, the port facility will also feature 100,000 metric tons of pellet storage capacity.

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VI. Urban Forestry

1. Louisville Tree Advisory Commission Disbands, Recommends Ordinance

Courier-Journal.com (June 23) - The Louisville, Kentucky, Metro Tree Advisory Commission recently disbanded, but one of its last actions was recommending a tree ordinance that seeks to increase the city's depleted tree canopy.

If adopted, the ordinance would allow residents to seek historic or other special protection for their landmark trees on their own private property, binding themselves and future landowners to care for them. The concept is similar to deed restrictions or conservation easements allowed under property law.

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2. City of Knoxville Releases First Urban Forestry Progress Report

Wate.com (June 24) - The city of Knoxville recently released its first Urban Forestry Progress Report-the first annual status report on the city's urban forestry program and progress on goals and objectives.

Some of the plans mentioned in the report include establishing goals for citywide canopy and completing an individual tree inventory within the park and along streets.

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3. Ash Tree Removal Begins in Kingston, Ontario

Wate.com (June 24) - Due to an infestation of the emerald ash borer, first detected in 2013, about 400 of the city's 3,500 ash trees will be removed. Ash trees comprise 12 percent of municipally owned trees in Kingston's urban area. In August, the city will begin treating 600 of the larger and healthier ash trees to prevent further damage from infestation. The insect has been wreaking havoc across Ontario since 2002.

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VII. Plants and Pests

1. Destructive Southern Pine Beetle Strikes Northeast

PikeCountyCoureir.com (June 22) - The southern pine beetle, which for generations has attacked forests throughout the southeastern United States, is methodically making its way into the Northeast, destroying thousands of trees in New York, New Jersey, and elsewhere.

It was first discovered in New York last October, about a decade after it appeared in New Jersey. The insect also has been found recently in Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island. A rich supply of pine trees amid rising temperatures may be attracting the beetles.

Note: SAF member John Wernet quoted.

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2. Gypsy Moths Back with a Vengeance: Counties Caught Off Guard

MCall.com (June 22) - Gypsy moth caterpillars were so bad this year that droppings from their constant leaf munching left a coat of "green slime" on Jeff Kunkle's driveway. There were times the Slatington resident's car couldn't make it up the driveway because it was so slick with the critters and their waste. And he had to use a leaf blower twice a day to clear a path to the house.

He isn't alone. Many residents of Northeast Pennsylvania have similar stories this year, said Terry Brady, spokesperson for the state Department of Conservation and Natural Resources.

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3. Ash Borer on the Move in Maryland, Iowa

Ash Borer Found in Maryland

Delawareonline.com (June 23) - Delaware is surrounded by the emerald ash borer. The destructive insect has been found in Maryland on the central and lower Delmarva Peninsula, bringing it even closer to neighboring Kent and Sussex counties in Delaware. It was also discovered in Harford County, next door to one of northern Delaware's closest Maryland neighbors. So far, though, the insect has not been found in the state.

Emerald Ash Borer in Grinnell, Iowa

KIOW.com (June 24) - After studying a larva sample collected from a city-owned tree in Grinnell on June 16, researchers identified emerald ash borer, bringing the total of confirmed infested counties since the emerald ash borer was first discovered in Iowa in 2010 to 25.

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VIII. Science and Research

1. Tiny Northwest Fly Could Save East Coast Hemlock Forests, Researchers Say

Oregon Live.com (June 23) - A tiny Northwest fly could be the key to saving the East Coast's hemlock forests.

A team of researchers at Oregon State University contends that the predatory silver fly could offer hope of controlling the hemlock woolly adelgid, an insect that has infested millions of acres of hemlocks from northern Georgia to Maine.

The US Forest Service has warned that without action, eastern hemlocks could go the way of the elm and American chestnut. The agency launched a massive initiative in the early 2000s to control the bug, but efforts so far have come up short.

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2. To Aid Conservation, Loggers, Landowners Asked to "Think Like a Bird"

MPBN.net (June 18) - In Maine, an extensive network of rural and suburban forest serves as the largest incubator for breeding birds in the country. But the forest is much younger and less diverse than it once was.

The interest in protecting this critical habitat is why foresters, loggers, and landowners are being trained to think like a bird.

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3. High-Tech Tools Help Wildland Firefighters

Heraldandnews.com (June 24) - At a glance, this view from NASA's MODIS-Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer-satellite doesn't look like much. But it actually tells Matthew Krunglevich, of the Oregon Department of Department of Forestry, a lot. The splashes of color on Krunglevich's monitor show where the fire is burning and where it's burning hottest: yellow equals warm, orange equals warmer. Predictably, the orange is shown where the fire is burning outward, where the flames are newer.

Note: Krunglevich is a member of SAF.

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IX. Items of Interest

1. Biologists: Snake Pathogen Is "Eerily Similar" to White-Nose Syndrome

SummitCountyVoice.com (June 21) - Biologists say they're tracking an emerging new fungal disease afflicting snakes that's "eerily similar" to the fungus that has wiped out millions of bats across the eastern United States.

The snake and bat pathogens emerged in North America in the mid-2000s. Both are moving from east to west across the United States and into parts of Canada.

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2. Chuck Leavell Quotes Aldo Leopold, Grows Trees in Georgia

JSonline.com (June 22) - If any industry could use a prominent advocate, it's forestry-because nothing grates on the ears of a forester like hearing someone say they won't buy a book because it'll kill a tree.

And few, if any, fit the role of forestry spokesman-at-large as well as Chuck Leavell, easily the world's most recognized tree farmer.

Leavell's tree plantation occupies 2,900 acres in Georgia. He has written books on woodland management, testified on logging legislation before Congress, and likes to quote legendary Wisconsin conservationist Aldo Leopold.

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3. Selkirk College Forest Technology Students Shift to Mountain Classroom

Castlegarsource.com (June 23) - Trading textbooks for tools of the trade, first year Selkirk College Forest Technology Program students wrapped up their semester in the bush.

Though outdoor work in the natural surroundings of the West Kootenay is a fixture of the nationally accredited two-year program, the semester ending ten-day field study session is an important send-off for the students who will be retuning for their second year in September. Over a two-week period, 26 students took part in a number of hands-on training exercises that complimented recently completed classroom study.

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X. SAF News

1. SAF Media Moments

Fargo city forester and SAF member Scott Liudahl is quoted in the article "Dutch Elm Disease Claiming Fargo Trees again this Year," which appeared on the website inforum.com on June 22.

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2. Journal of Forestry Call for Papers: Tribal Forest Management and Research You May Be Missing

Tribal forestry has received an increasing amount of attention to provide approaches for solving our most complex issues facing natural resource managers, as it provides numerous examples of balancing complex, multiple objectives in an era of shrinking budgets, novel ecologic interactions, and increasing human demands on our natural resources.

Now, a special issue of the Journal of Forestry seeks to capture the broad range of forest management practices occurring on tribal lands to increase general recognition of the role that tribal forests play in the greater landscape and to engage broad audiences regarding the value of tribal forests and how they can serve as models for sustainability, integrated management, resilience, and restoration.

For more information, see the call for papers on the SAF website or contact guest editors Mike Dockry or Serra Hoagland with questions about the special issue or potential article topics.

Research You May Be Missing

Interested in what your colleagues have been reading? Below are the top most downloaded articles from each of SAF's scientific journal publications for the month of May.

The Burning Question: Does Forest Bioenergy Reduce Carbon Emissions? A Review of Common Misconceptions about Forest Carbon Accounting (Journal of Forestry Vol. 113, No. 1)

Complex Forest Ecosystems: From Tree to Landscape (Forest Science Vol. 61, No. 3)

To see the complete top 10 most downloaded article lists, visit the publications page on the SAF website, click on the journal you wish to view, then click Most Downloaded Articles.

Your GOLD- or PLATINUM-level membership entitles you to free access to all journal content, but you need to register with IngentaConnect to get it. Questions? Contact Matthew Walls.

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3. Apply Now for 2015 Ben Meadows and SAF Diversity Scholarships

Ben Meadows Scholarships

Apply now for the $2,500 Academic Achievement and Leadership Natural Resource Scholarships from Ben Meadows!

All scholarship candidates must be enrolled, full time, as a junior or senior in a natural resource program working toward a bachelor's degree, which includes, but not limited to, agroforestry, urban forestry, environmental studies, natural resource management, natural resource recreation, wildlife management, wood science, and fisheries management.

Applications are due by June 30. Eligible students are encouraged to apply. Instructions, complete requirements, and the application form can be found on the Ben Meadows website.

SAF Diversity Scholarships

Apply now to be part of the SAF Diversity Ambassador Program and participate in the 2015 SAF National Convention in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Ambassadors will receive leadership and networking training, interact with SAF leaders, meet the Chief of the US Forest Service and other professionals, and learn how to participate as a future leader in SAF.

The deadline for applications is Friday, September 4, 2015.

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4. 2015 SAF National Convention News

2015 SAF Convention News

The 2015 SAF National Convention-Recreating Forestry-"The Confluence of Science, Society, and Technology"-will highlight a variety of contemporary forest resource management issues, including the trends, influences, and technologies that are facilitating the profession's progress toward the future.

The meeting will take place in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, where attendees will enjoy fabulous hospitality, the charm of Louisiana's capital city on the banks of the mighty Mississippi, and world-renowned cuisine alongside a scientific and technical program that provides an intrinsic opportunity for exploring the many links between the social, economic, and ecological considerations that form modern forest stewardship. Visit the SAF Convention website for full event details.

Abstract submission is now open for individual presentations and panels in the scientific and technical concurrent sessions or poster symposium. Submit Your Presentation or Poster

New for 2015! The "Boots on the Ground" concurrent track is designed to present case studies and research that can help field foresters find solutions to management problems they face on a regular basis. Topics may include (but are not limited to):

  • Managing around oil and gas pipelines
  • The Clean Water Act
  • Tips for working more effectively with contractors and migrant workers
  • Wild pig management
  • How to work with local ordinances
  • Maintaining soil physical and chemical properties and organic matter
  • Procurement tips and tools
  • Logging and timber supply trends
  • New and emerging field technologies

New for 2015! The SAF Matters concurrent track is designed to provide a forum for members to discuss various issues, share best practices for State Society management, or learn about and promote ongoing and upcoming initiatives.

We encourage your submissions on these and other topics: Recreating Forestry through Science, Recreating Forestry through Society, Recreating Forestry through Technology, Recreating Forestry through Education and Outreach, Agroforestry, Consulting Forestry, Entomology & Pathology, Economics, Fire, Forest Ecology, Geospatial Technologies, History, International Forestry, Inventory & Biometrics, Policy, Recreation, Silviculture, Social Sciences, Soils & Hydrology, US Forest Service National Silviculture Workshop (NSW), Urban & Community Forestry, Utilization & Engineering, and Wildlife Management.

For more information on presenting see the SAF convention website. Click here to submit an abstract.

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5. SAF Store Sale Item of the Week: Insignia Belt Buckle

This handsome (lead free) pewter belt buckle stands 2.5? tall and features the SAF insignia with larger text. Order yours today for just $29.95.

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