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February 27, 2015


 


For the latest forestry news, see the "Forestry News" section of the SAF homepage.

In This Issue ...

I. Featured News

1. Maine: LePage Plan Could Make Forestry Top Priority in Managing Public Lands
2. Hawaii: Researchers Identify Aggressive Fungus Killing 'Ohia Trees
3. Montana: Smokejumpers' Last DC-3 Gets Ready to Work
4. Oregon: Forest Managers Talk Cooperation, Healthy Trees
5. Washington: Appeal to Stop Logging on Burned State Lands Filed

II. Federal Lands Management

1. Thinning the Tinder
2. US Government Sells Off Select Parts of the Black Hills National Forest
3. Rural Western Montana Counties Struggling with Loss of Federal Funds
4. Tongass Transition Plan May Run Short on Timber
5. Lawmakers Seek Applicants to Develop $2 Million Land Transfer Legal Strategy

III. International Forestry News

1. Ireland: Forestry Has Stacks of Ambition
2. Devastation from P. Ramorum Leads to Rebirth of Welsh Forest
3. Pakistan: GPS Technology To Be Used to Monitor Forests

IV. Forest Products Industry

1. Shrinking Timber Supply Sends BC Companies on US Mill-Buying Spree
2. Solid Wood: The Rise of Mass Timber Architecture
3. Northwest Hardwoods Completes Acquisition of Industrial Timber and Lumber
4. Lumber Liquidators Opens Testing Facility
5. Logging Conference Opens Doors to Students

V. Biomass

1. Biomass Plants Gaining Steam, But Do They Result in Less Carbon?
2. Rentech's New England Wood Pellet Acquires Allegheny Pellet
3. New Catalyst to Create Chemical Building Blocks from Biomass
4. EPA: More Than 4 Million Cellulosic RINs Generated in January
5. European Union Committee Votes to Cap First-Generation Biofuels

VI. Urban Forestry

1. Utah: Trees and Plants Confused by Temperature Fluctuations
2. City to Spend $12.9 Million This Year to Plant Trees and Combat Emerald Ash Borer Beetle
3. Growing Trees Smarter in Marrickville, Australia

VII. Plants and Pests

1. The Emerald Ash Borer Beetle Has Killed Trees in 22 States
2. Invasive Species Battle Continues in Skaneateles Lake Watershed
3. UK: Hope in the Battle against Spread of Devastating Ash Tree Disease

VIII. Science and Research

1. New Hope for Beetle-Killed Landscapes
2. Tracking Invasives? There's an App for That
3. Droning On: The Latest on Drones and Research

IX. Items of Interest

1. Researchers Conducting Major Studies on Coyotes in the South
2. Robotics and Automation Take Off for Farmers, Research
3. Forestry Board to Honor Forest Operators

X. SAF News

1. SAF Members in the News
2. Forest Policy News
3. SAF Journals: Research You Might Have Missed
4. Meetings: SAF and Otherwise
5. 2015 SAF National Convention Call for Presentations Now Open


I. Featured News

1. Maine: LePage Plan Could Make Forestry Top Priority in Managing Public Lands

BangorDailyNews.com (February 25) - Conservationists are skeptical about Gov. Paul LePage's budget for the state's natural resources departments, fearful that it would open the gates for expanded commercial harvesting of state-owned property.

LePage wants to do away with the Bureau of Parks and Lands, which is responsible for the management of more than 600,000 public acres. Instead, management of that property would go to the Maine Forest Service.

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2. Hawaii: Researchers Identify Aggressive Fungus Killing 'Ohia Trees

HawaiinNewsnow.com (February 24) - For the past five years, 'ohia trees on Hawai'i Island have been under attack — dying mysteriously and rapidly from an unknown disease. Now, researchers are one step closer to figuring out how to prevent mass devastation because they've figured out what's killing the native species.

Note: For more on this item, see item #1 under SAF News.

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3. Montana: Smokejumpers' Last DC-3 Gets Ready to Work

Missoulian.com (February 21) - Just shy of her 70th birthday, Jump-15 can still spool up faster than the smokejumpers she carries.

The young men and women going to fight wildfires have 10 minutes to get dressed out, briefed and loaded. The old DC-3 needed just eight minutes to rev her engines and quit the Earth on the first shakedown flight of 2015.

But to the dismay of many of her pilots and passengers, this will be Jump-15's last firefighting season.

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4. Oregon: Forest Managers Talk Cooperation, Healthy Trees

Herald News.com (February 19) - A host of agencies, organizations, and individuals dedicated an entire day to making a roadmap for improving forest health and reducing wildfire.

The workshop, organized by the Oregon State University Klamath Basin Research Extension Center (KBREC), was titled "How we can partner to increase the pace and scale of forest health and restoration across ownerships."

According to Daniel Leavell, professor of forestry and coordinator at KBREC and a member of SAF, the workshop's goal was to brainstorm methods for successfully increasing the scope and scale of forest restoration, thereby reducing fire susceptibility, within Klamath and Lake counties.

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5. Washington: Appeal to Stop Logging on Burned State Lands Filed

CBSlocal.com (February 20) - Two conservation groups — Conservation Northwest, the Kettle Range Conservation Group — and a resident want to stop the state from allowing logging on state lands that burned in a massive wildfire in north-central Washington last summer.

The parties filed an appeal with the Washington Pollution Control Hearings Board last week, saying that logging on about 1,200 acres of forests burned in the Carlton Complex Fire would lead to more erosion and mudslides.

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II. Federal Lands Management

1. Thinning the Tinder

Boise Weekly.com (February 25) - According to US Forest Service officials, the timberland around the Upper North Fork River looks "red and dead." The area north of Salmon near the Idaho-Montana border hasn't burned in more than 100 years, which means when the next wildfire does go ripping through, there's a high risk of it showing extreme behavior.

In an effort to protect the area, Salmon-Challis National Forest officials submitted a proposal to the US Forest Service to be part of the Chiefs' Joint Landscape Restoration Partnership. The agency received more than 40 proposals from across the country and the Salmon-Challis officers' was one of the 15 chosen.

And in other fire-related news:

Custer-Area Fire Prevention Efforts Funded
Rapidcityjournal.com (February 24)

USDA Public-Private Partners Tackling Wildfire Issues in Oregon
Blogs.usda.gov (February 20)

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2. US Government Sells Off Select Parts of the Black Hills National Forest

SiouxCityJournal.com (February 22) - Last September, the US Forest Service sold a 20-acre parcel of the Black Hills National Forest — the latest sale in an ongoing divestiture of up to nine tracts totaling 362 acres of Black Hills National Forest property. Congress, at the behest of the South Dakota delegation, passed legislation authorizing the sales 15 years ago.

The most recent sales, finalized in December and January, raised more than $1.9 million in total proceeds that are earmarked for the purchase, construction, or renovation of Black Hills National Forest offices or work sites.

Note: SAF member Craig Bobzien, CF, is quoted in the article.

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3. Rural Western Montana Counties Struggling with Loss of Federal Funds

MTstandard.com (February 23) - Montana's Mineral County, which has a budget just north of $4 million, faces a hit of $750,000 pending action from a fickle Congress.

It's not a pretty picture for a county that has watched its economic base trickle away with the timber industry.

Mineral County's plight is one of the more dramatic, but commissioners from forested counties across Montana and the West are tossing and turning after Congress failed to reauthorize the $330 million Secure Rural Schools Act during last year's budget wars.

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4. Tongass Transition Plan May Run Short on Timber

KCAW.org (February 20) - A new forecast says current plans for logging younger Tongass trees will not provide enough wood to maintain the region's timber industry, but a more aggressive approach might.

For more on management of the Tongass National Forest and the efforts to bolster the region's forest products industry, see "Transition to Young Growth Is Key Challenge on the Tongass National Forest" from the February 2015 issue of The Forestry Source.

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5. Lawmakers Seek Applicants to Develop $2 Million Land Transfer Legal Strategy

SLTrib.com (February 23) - Utah lawmakers started taking applications from firms interested in tapping a $2 million war chest for the state's fight over public lands.

The Legislature's Commission for the Stewardship of Public Lands released a 26-page request for proposals seeking outside lawyers for two separate contracts — one for legal consulting services and the other for "relation services," including lobbying.

Lawmakers and the governor have set aside $2 million to launch the legal fight, and legislators are contemplating adding another $1 million to the fund during the 2015 legislature.

More:

Conservation Groups Unite to Oppose Takeover of Land
Denverpost.com (February 25)

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III. International Forestry News

1. Ireland: Forestry Has Stacks of Ambition

Irish examiner.com (February 23) - A barometer of landowner interest in forestry was the recent turnout of 1,300 people at nationwide information meetings organized by Teagasc in association with the nation's Forest Service.

Ireland's new, six-year Forestry Program, approved by the government last December, consists of 11 separate measures and spending of €262m — with a further €220m in future commitments, from 2020, mostly in relation to premium payments.

Minister of State, Tom Hayes, said government approval of the program was a milestone in the development of the sector and a vote of confidence in an industry that contributed €2.3bn to GDP in 2012.

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2. Devastation from P. Ramorum Leads to Rebirth of Welsh Forest

Hortweek.com (February 24) - Around 650 hectares of larch affected by or at risk from Phytophthora ramorum have been felled in Afan Forest Park near Port Talbot.

Natural Resources Wales has said the aim is to build a forest more resilient to climate change and potential new diseases, while also increasing biodiversity, improving water quality, and reducing flooding.

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3. Pakistan: GPS Technology To Be Used to Monitor Forests

Dawn.com (February 24) - Chief Minister Pervez Khattak opened the country's tree plantation campaign 2015 by planting a sapling of Chinar at the lawns of the Chief Minister House.

Talking to members of the media on the occasion, Khattak said that the tree plantation drive was being launched with new vigor wherein 350 million saplings would be planted in streamlined and scientific ways. He said that the number would be increased to one billion trees during the coming three years.

A salient feature of the campaign, he said, would be the use of latest GPS technology that would not only ensure proper growth of each and every sapling.

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IV. Forest Products Industry

1. Shrinking Timber Supply Sends BC Companies on US Mill-Buying Spree

Business in Vancouver (February 24) - At first blush, year-end financials and stock prices for British Columbia's largest forest companies would suggest the province's forestry sector is well on the road to recovery after a decade-long slump.

But that increase in production and stock value is largely attributable to recent acquisitions of sawmills in the United States, not to a boom in their B.C. operations. In fact, Canfor and Interfor have both closed mills in BC in recent years.

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2. Solid Wood: The Rise of Mass Timber Architecture

Archdaily.com (February 18) - Largely overlooked in the development of Modernism, timber architecture is making a comeback in the 21st century with the success of designers such as last year's Pritzker Prize winner Shigeru Ban, and the push toward timber towers from large influential firms such as SOM. In the following extract, author Joseph Mayo introduces his new book, Solid Wood: Case Studies in Mass Timber Architecture, Technology and Design, which examines the rise of mass timber design through historical analysis and contemporary case studies.

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3. Northwest Hardwoods Completes Acquisition of Industrial Timber and Lumber

Businesswire.com (February 23) - Northwest Hardwoods Inc. (NWH) has recently completed the acquisition of Industrial Timber & Lumber Company (ITL) based in Beachwood, Ohio. NWH is headquartered in Tacoma, Washington, and has operations in the United States, Canada, China, and Japan.

ITL is one of the largest global suppliers of North American hardwood. It sells more than 200 million board feet of high quality hardwood lumber annually and has approximately 400 employees. ITL owns two integrated sawmills, four concentration yards and one dedicated service center with operations in Ohio, West Virginia, North Carolina, and Pennsylvania.

More:

Timber Operation Changes Hands
McDowellnews.com (February 24)

Northwest Hardwoods Expecting to Resume Full Production Soon
TDN.com (February 24)

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4. Lumber Liquidators Opens Testing Facility

Richmond.com (February 23) - Lumber Liquidators, a specialty retailer of hardwood flooring, has announced that it has built an advanced testing facility at its new distribution center in the White Oak Technology Park in eastern Henrico County, Virginia.

The 1,500-square-foot lab includes two temperature- and humidity-controlled conditioning rooms, and two formaldehyde emission chambers.

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5. Logging Conference Opens Doors to Students

Capitalpress.com (February 24) - The annual Oregon Logging Conference offered a chance for school children to get a glimpse of the logging industry and its importance to the economy, and the environment.

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V. Biomass

1. Biomass Plants Gaining Steam, But Do They Result in Less Carbon?

Forbes.com (February 24) - Constellation, a subsidiary of Exelon Corp., is investing $200 million in a Georgia-based biomass facility that will produce 50 megawatts when it is completed in 2017.

Although the project is part of a renewable portfolio requirement in Georgia, it is also a company goal for Procter & Gamble — to fuel itself by using 30 percent green energy by 2020.

The question, though, is whether biomass actually cuts carbon.

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2. Rentech's New England Wood Pellet Acquires Allegheny Pellet

Biomass Magazine.com (February 23) - Rentech Inc. has announced that its subsidiary, New England Wood Pellet (NEWP), has acquired the assets of Allegheny Pellet Corp. The acquisition expands NEWP's market position as the largest producer of wood pellets for the US heating market.

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3. New Catalyst to Create Chemical Building Blocks from Biomass

RDmag.com (February 23) - University of Tokyo researchers have developed a novel selective catalyst that allows the creation of several basic chemicals from biomass instead of petroleum. This discovery may lead to the use of plant biomass as a basic feedstock for the chemical industry.

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4. EPA: More Than 4 Million Cellulosic RINs Generated in January

Biomass Magazine.com (February 23) - The US Environmental Protection Agency has published renewable identification number (RIN) generation data for January, reporting that nearly 1.38 billion RINs were generated during the month.

More than 4.07 million D3 cellulosic biofuel RINs were generated during in January, including 114,261 for ethanol, 1.43 million for renewable compressed natural gas, and 2.53 million for renewable liquefied natural gas.

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5. European Union Committee Votes to Cap First-Generation Biofuels

Biomass Magazine.com (February 24) - On February 24, the Environment Committee of the European Parliament approved a draft law to cap the production of traditional biofuels and accelerate the shift to alternative feedstocks, such as seaweed and waste. According to information released by the committee, the law aims to reduce greenhouse gas emissions that result from the growing use of agricultural land to produce biofuel crops.

A statement released by the committee explains current legislation requires EU member states to ensure renewable energy accounts for at least 10 percent of transportation energy consumption by 2020. The draft law approved by the committee would place a cap on the contribution of first-generation biofuels, limiting them to 6 percent of final transportation energy consumption by 2020.

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VI. Urban Forestry

1. Utah: Trees and Plants Confused by Temperature Fluctuations

Deseretnews.com (February 24) - This February will go down as the warmest on record in Utah. But with the return of cold, snowy weather, many trees and plants throughout the state are "confused." Over the last couple of weeks, early blooming flowers and early budding trees have already started to wake up.

The whiplash weather has plenty of trees budding across the state. Willows, cottonwoods, elms, and other trees are budding on their weather cues. But healthy trees should be able to withstand the unseasonable fluctuations in temperature and precipitation.

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2. City to Spend $12.9 Million This Year to Plant Trees and Combat Emerald Ash Borer Beetle

MontrealGazette.com (February 22) - Montreal, Quebec will increase the amount it has been spending to replace ash trees that were devastated by the emerald ash borer, an insect that has already claimed 80 million ash trees in North America since 2002, and has been present in the city for the last two years.

A $2 million budget will be set aside for boroughs to do more surveying and to replace trees already felled after the beetle was detected.

The city has dedicated a total of $12.9 million to fight the ash borer beetle in 2015, and to begin the process of planting the 300,000 new trees.

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3. Growing Trees Smarter in Marrickville, Australia

PRwire.com (February 20) - Trees usually come second to footpaths, roads, curbs, and gutters — but the Marrickville Council is determined to turn this thinking around.

So when a footpath was being upgraded in Cavendish Street Stanmore, Council's "whole of street" approach presented an opportunity to remove and replace three very large Ficus hillii with an in-road tree planting of three "super-advanced" Waterhousea floribunda (Weeping Lilly Pilly).

This new approach means that damage from tree roots to nearby properties and structures will be prevented. It's all part of a new initiative called "Connecting Marrickville."

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VII. Plants and Pests

1. The Emerald Ash Borer Beetle Has Killed Trees in 22 States

Northdallasgazette.com (February 22) - Emerald ash borers now have infested at least 22 states and two Canadian provinces and have become the most destructive and costly forest insect to ever invade North America, says Deb McCullough, Michigan State University professor of forest entomology.

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2. Invasive Species Battle Continues in Skaneateles Lake Watershed

Auburnpub.com (January 28) - In the ongoing war against invasive species in the Skaneateles Lake watershed, Cornell Cooperative Extension of Onondaga County hopes to train some recruits to spot the enemy.

As hemlock woolly adelgid makes its presence known along both sides of the lake, Cooperative Extension is hosting a series of hikes at area nature preserves to help citizens become familiar with the adelgid and what it does to hemlock trees.

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3. UK: Hope in the Battle against Spread of Devastating Ash Tree Disease

WesternMorningNews.co.uk (February 20) - A deadly tree disease that has devastated the UK's ash population could infect most of Cornwall within the next five years, a forestry expert has warned.

But the likelihood is that the spread of ash dieback will be much slower, by which time new control methods and disease-resistant strains of the tree may have been developed.

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VIII. Science and Research

1. New Hope for Beetle-Killed Landscapes

HCN.org (February 25) - Since the 1990s, naturally occurring bark beetles have multiplied under the effects of drought, climate change, and fire-repressed forests, leading to outbreaks that have ravaged forests and left land managers scrambling to deal with a glut of dead trees. But 2015 may prove to be a turning point.

The first hopeful news comes from the lab of Richard Hofstetter, a forest entomologist at Northern Arizona University. Working with a private company called Montana BioAgriculture, Hofstetter has identified a deadly strain of the Beauveria bassiana fungus that kills 80 to 90 percent of pine beetles.

Note: Hofstetter is a member of SAF.

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2. Tracking Invasives? There's an App for That

ECNmag.com (February 23) - Invasive species will have a tougher time sneaking around undetected, thanks to an app developed by Michigan State University.

Midwestern residents can now snap photos with their smart phones, log a few quick notes, and send their alert to a growing network of scientists and state officials who can use this critical information to increase response to these threats. The free app is one component of the Midwest Invasive Species Information Network.

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3. Droning On: The Latest on Drones and Research

Drones Play a Role in Hampton Roads Science, Research
Daily Press.com (February 23) - In a few months, a pair of small, unmanned drones will soar over forests and swamps in southwestern Nigeria, their onboard cameras scanning the ground for the remains of a lost civilization.

Eco-Drones Aid Researchers in Fight to Save the Environment
NbcNews.com (February 20) - Drones are getting a green makeover as environmentalists and earth scientists put the unmanned vehicles to a variety of eco-friendly jobs, from studying wildlife and polar ice melting to monitoring water for harmful bacteria to reforesting areas that have been overharvested.

Modern Technology Monitors World Heritage Forests
UQ.edu.au (February 23) - Drones, laser scanners, planes, and sharp shooters have been put to work in the Tasmanian forest to better understand the environmental effects of forest management regimes.

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IX. Items of Interest

1. Researchers Conducting Major Studies on Coyotes in the South

Techtimes.com (February 23) - A couple of studies are underway to understand some of the behavioral aspects of coyotes in the South.

The studies are taking place as increasing numbers of coyotes are having an impact on the ecology of many regions. The growing population of coyotes is even affecting the fawn population in some areas.

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2. Robotics and Automation Take Off for Farmers, Research

Voxy.co.nz (New Zealand, February 24) - New research released last week by the Boston Consulting Group (BCG) is predicting that advanced robotics will boost productivity by up to 30 percent in many industries by 2025.

Although industrial robots have been used in factories for decades, the use of advanced robots and automation is now reshaping how we grow and harvest the world's food and fiber.

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3. Forestry Board to Honor Forest Operators

Mycentraloregon.com (February 23) - Oregon's State Board of Forestry will honor the recipients of its Forest Practices Operator of the Year award and receive updates on key topics, including work to obtain insurance to help cover costs of fighting large wildfires, at its March 4 meeting in Salem.

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X. SAF News

1. SAF Members in the News

  • University of Hawaii extension forester and SAF member J.B. Friday quoted in article on tree disease known as "Rapid Ohia Death"
    WestHawaiiToday.com (February 22)

  • SAF member Beth Ritterholz quoted in article about Ohio State University's efforts to conserve its trees.
    Lantern.com (February 23)

  • SAF member Tim Phelps quoted in article on state's efforts to obtain federal aid to fight the hemlock woolly adelgid. SAF member and Kentucky state forester Leah MacSwords is also mentioned.
    WDRB.com (February 20)

  • The Auburn Journal ran an article on SAF member Jane LaBoa, who recently became an SAF Fellow.
    Auburn Journal.com (February 19)

  • SAF member Jim Sitts, CF, has been elected to the Hardwood Federation board of directors.
    woodworkingnetwork.com (February 18)

If you've had a media moment, or you know of another SAF member who's been in the news lately, please let us know.

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2. Forest Policy News

  • SAF Henry Clepper Forest Policy Intern Bridget Bodick participated in the first of a series of Food and Agriculture Organization seminars. The discussion focused on issues pertaining to bioenergy, such as what the implementation of wood energy can do for nations around the world and where there is room for GHG emissions to be offset with the many uses of wood energy.

  • Director of Forest Policy John Barnwell continued work to forge better relationships with new partners and visited the headquarters of the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies for discussions with government agency budget officers. Though not always relevant to SAF priorities, the presentations are useful because they allow comparing and contrasting the US Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management approach to budget priorities compared to other agencies.

  • Associate Director of Forest Policy Danielle Watson teamed up with the Outdoor Industry Association to introduce freshman Sen. David Perdue (R-GA) to the problems with our current system of wildfire budgeting and how the Wildfire Disaster Funding Act can help. Strategically, joint meetings with diverse stakeholders can be very effective and impactful for congressional staff, while also reinforcing relationships among our broad range of partners.

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3. SAF Journals: Research You Might Have Missed

Interested in what your colleagues have been reading? Below are the top most downloaded articles from each of SAF's scientific journal publications for the month of January.

Forest Site Classification for Cultural Plant Harvest by Tribal Weavers Can Inform Management (Journal of Forestry Vol. 113, No. 1)

Calculation of a Growth Dominance Statistic for Forest Stands (Forest Science Vol. 60, No. 6)

To see the complete top 10 most downloaded article lists, visit the publications page on the SAF website, click on the journal you wish to view, then click Most Downloaded Articles.

Your GOLD- or PLATINUM-level membership entitles you to free access to all journal content, but you need to register with IngentaConnect to get it. Questions? Contact Matthew Walls.

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4. Meetings: SAF and Otherwise

New England Society of American Foresters 95th Annual Winter Meeting: Changing Silviculture in a Changing World
March 25-27
Lake Morey Resort in Fairlee, VT
For more information, visit the NESAF website.

Alaska SAF Annual Meeting
March 25-27
PikeĀ¹s Waterfront Lodge, Fairbanks, AK
Contact: Jim Schwarber

Washington SAF — Washington Chapter of The Wildlife Society Joint Annual Meeting
April 15-17
Great Wolf Lodge, Grand Mound, WA
Contact: Peter Heide at (360) 791-8299

Oregon SAF — Oregon Chapter of The Wildlife Society Joint Annual Meeting
April 29-May 1
Eugene Hilton, Eugene, OR
Contact: Dale Claassen at (541) 954-6953, or Fran Cafferata Coe at (503) 680-7939

Colorado/Wyoming SAF Annual Meeting — held jointly with the Colorado Timber Industry Association and Colorado Tree Farmers Association
May 7, 8, 9 - 2015, Glenwood Springs, Colorado
For more information, visit the Colorado-Wyoming SAF website or contact Cary Green, 970-827-5160.

2015 North American Forest Ecology Workshop Call for Abstracts — Deadline Extended
NAFEW.org (undated) - The 10th North American Forest Ecology Workshop (NAFEW) will take place June 14-18 in Veracruz, Mexico. Organized by the Colegio de Postgraduados in association with Colegio de la Frontera Sur, the Mexican Academy of Forest Sciences, and the University of Veracruz, the workshop will offer forest ecologists from around North America a chance to share ideas, knowledge, experiences, and challenges on forest ecosystems of Canada, Mexico, and the United States. The program will include three days of oral and poster presentations, as well as one day of in-conference field trips. Oral presentations will consist of invited plenary speakers and volunteer presentations.

The deadline for abstract submission for both oral and poster presentations is February 28, 2015. The organizing Committee will work on making arrangements for a group of presentations to be published in a special issue of a top-ranked forest ecology journal.

For more information, see the Call for Abstracts on the workshop's website.

For additional meetings and workshops, visit the Event Calendar on the SAF website.

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5. 2015 SAF National Convention News

The 2015 SAF National Convention — Recreating Forestry — "The Confluence of Science, Society, and Technology" — will highlight a variety of contemporary forest resource management issues, including the trends, influences, and technologies that are facilitating the profession's progress toward the future.

The meeting will take place in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, where attendees will enjoy fabulous hospitality, the charm of Louisiana's capital city on the banks of the mighty Mississippi, and world-renowned cuisine alongside a scientific and technical program that provides an intrinsic opportunity for exploring the many links between the social, economic, and ecological considerations that form modern forest stewardship. Visit the SAF Convention website for full event details.

Abstract submission is now open for individual presentations and panels in the scientific and technical concurrent sessions or poster symposium. Submit Your Presentation or Poster.

New for 2015! The "Boots on the Ground" concurrent track is designed to present case studies and research that can help field foresters find solutions to management problems they face on a regular basis. Topics may include (but are not limited to):

  • Managing around oil and gas pipelines
  • The Clean Water Act
  • Tips for working more effectively with contractors and migrant workers
  • Wild pig management
  • How to work with local ordinances
  • Maintaining soil physical and chemical properties and organic matter
  • Procurement tips and tools
  • Logging and timber supply trends
  • New and emerging field technologies

New for 2015! The SAF Matters concurrent track is designed to provide a forum for members to discuss various issues, share best practices for State Society management, or learn about and promote ongoing and upcoming initiatives.

We encourage your submissions on these and other topics: Recreating Forestry through Science, Recreating Forestry through Society, Recreating Forestry through Technology, Recreating Forestry through Education and Outreach, Agroforestry, Consulting Forestry, Entomology & Pathology, Economics, Fire, Forest Ecology, Geospatial Technologies, History, International Forestry, Inventory & Biometrics, Policy, Recreation, Silviculture, Social Sciences, Soils & Hydrology, US Forest Service National Silviculture Workshop (NSW), Urban & Community Forestry, Utilization & Engineering, and Wildlife Management.

For more information on presenting see the SAF convention website. Click here to submit an abstract.

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